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    Hi everyone !
    I'm currently a student in my second year of law school at Paris II Panthéon Assas university. Next year, i'll be completing my LLB in french law, specialized in private law, and I've been thinking a lot about coming to England to start a GDL/CPE program after that..

    At first I heard that the GDL was only for people with non-qualifying law degrees.. but then after some research I realized that it's possible to apply when you have a foreign law degree.

    Let me quickly explain my situation : after graduating from the Lycée Descartes in Morocco (a french high school) with honors ( "mention très bien", which, means i had an overall average superior to 16/20), i received my acceptance letter from Paris II.
    At that time i felt really happy, since this university has the reputation of being the best law school in france, and since it's very hard for non-parisians student to get into.

    After my first year, i quickly realized that civil law wasn't what i had dreamed of studying, and that i preferred the Common law system over the continental one.. most importantly, I hate that university and the way we're being taught, which is really too theoretical... and boring.
    I passed my first year with good marks, and hopefully the same will happen this year (around 50% of people fail/repeat their year/quit every year until the master's degree).

    I also have a good level in english, I scored a 105/120 at the toefl and 930/990 at the toeic.

    So...Sorry for babbling but I had to explain my situation , here are my questions :
    - do you think the transition will be possible for me, from one system to another? do you think i'll have difficulties to follow during lectures etc ?
    - where should I apply next year for a GDL ? BBP, College of law... i'm really lost at this point ( which one is more career-oriented? ), and what are my chances of getting in ?
    - Do i need to find a trainee program at a firm before starting the GDL or during/after the LPC ?
    - do I have to get a certificate of academic standing from the SRA or can i be exempted ?
    - is the GDL a recognized diploma in the legal market? or is the LLB always considered to be better ?

    Thank you all in advance for your answers, you'd really be helping me out ! xx
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    Hi kenzalex1205,

    Saw your post - great to hear you’re thinking of studying law in the UK!

    Every year we welcome hundreds of international students to The College of Law (now known as The University of Law), so we have plenty of experience of supporting aspiring lawyers from around the world.

    We can confirm that the Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) is highly regarded by legal employers in the UK and considered as equivalent to an LL.B. In fact, many legal employers particularly value the experience that GDL graduates can offer.

    If you decide to study the GDL, we recommend finding the course that’s right for you. The University of Law’s GDL is very much a practice focused course and is taught by qualified lawyers with practical experience of working in law firms or chambers. It also offers a unique Preparing for Practice module, designed to give you the professional skills you’ll need as a modern lawyer. You can find out more about our GDL here: http://www.law.ac.uk/gdl.html

    You might also find our GDL entry requirements page helpful in answering some of your specific queries: http://www.law.ac.uk/Our-Courses/GDL...-requirements/

    It’s great that you’re taking a careful approach to planning your legal career! We recommend having a look at the free award-winning employability programme (StEP) on our Future Lawyers Network. Step 3 (http://www.law.ac.uk/Step-3/) contains a wealth of information to help you plan your route into the legal profession and ensure you’ve gained the experience sought by recruiters.

    If you have any queries on The University of Law, please feel free to keep in touch with us via Facebook and Twitter:

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    Hope this helps!
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    Hi there,

    Sorry if I'm posting in the wrong place but I have a similar problem...sort of!

    I'm English but currently studying in France, I've done my first 3 years and am now going into my 1st masters of "droit des affaires"/business law. At this point I'd really like to come home to the UK and I counted on doing the GDL asap with the University of Law in order to practice in the UK but I don't know whether or not I should stay for my 2nd Masters degree of "droit des affaires internationales"/international business law?

    I'm very conscious that if I stay I'm going to be really old before I actually start working, as I'll have 2 years left here and 2 years left to do when I finally arrive in the Uk, but at the same time there isn't any specialisation in the GDL so later on if I want to specialise in the field I had worked I'm worried it might be difficult, or does it not really matter if I have it or not?!

    I'm not really sure what to do! Can anyone help?

    Cheers in advance
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    (Original post by kenzalex1205)
    Hi everyone !
    I'm currently a student in my second year of law school at Paris II Panthéon Assas university. Next year, i'll be completing my LLB in french law, specialized in private law, and I've been thinking a lot about coming to England to start a GDL/CPE program after that..

    At first I heard that the GDL was only for people with non-qualifying law degrees.. but then after some research I realized that it's possible to apply when you have a foreign law degree.

    Let me quickly explain my situation : after graduating from the Lycée Descartes in Morocco (a french high school) with honors ( "mention très bien", which, means i had an overall average superior to 16/20), i received my acceptance letter from Paris II.
    At that time i felt really happy, since this university has the reputation of being the best law school in france, and since it's very hard for non-parisians student to get into.

    After my first year, i quickly realized that civil law wasn't what i had dreamed of studying, and that i preferred the Common law system over the continental one.. most importantly, I hate that university and the way we're being taught, which is really too theoretical... and boring.
    I passed my first year with good marks, and hopefully the same will happen this year (around 50% of people fail/repeat their year/quit every year until the master's degree).

    I also have a good level in english, I scored a 105/120 at the toefl and 930/990 at the toeic.

    So...Sorry for babbling but I had to explain my situation , here are my questions :
    - do you think the transition will be possible for me, from one system to another? do you think i'll have difficulties to follow during lectures etc ?
    - where should I apply next year for a GDL ? BBP, College of law... i'm really lost at this point ( which one is more career-oriented? ), and what are my chances of getting in ?
    - Do i need to find a trainee program at a firm before starting the GDL or during/after the LPC ?
    - do I have to get a certificate of academic standing from the SRA or can i be exempted ?
    - is the GDL a recognized diploma in the legal market? or is the LLB always considered to be better ?

    Thank you all in advance for your answers, you'd really be helping me out ! xx
    (Original post by The University of Law)
    Hi kenzalex1205,

    Saw your post - great to hear you’re thinking of studying law in the UK!

    Every year we welcome hundreds of international students to The College of Law (now known as The University of Law), so we have plenty of experience of supporting aspiring lawyers from around the world.

    We can confirm that the Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) is highly regarded by legal employers in the UK and considered as equivalent to an LL.B. In fact, many legal employers particularly value the experience that GDL graduates can offer.

    If you decide to study the GDL, we recommend finding the course that’s right for you. The University of Law’s GDL is very much a practice focused course and is taught by qualified lawyers with practical experience of working in law firms or chambers. It also offers a unique Preparing for Practice module, designed to give you the professional skills you’ll need as a modern lawyer. You can find out more about our GDL here: http://www.law.ac.uk/gdl.html

    You might also find our GDL entry requirements page helpful in answering some of your specific queries: http://www.law.ac.uk/Our-Courses/GDL...-requirements/

    It’s great that you’re taking a careful approach to planning your legal career! We recommend having a look at the free award-winning employability programme (StEP) on our Future Lawyers Network. Step 3 (http://www.law.ac.uk/Step-3/) contains a wealth of information to help you plan your route into the legal profession and ensure you’ve gained the experience sought by recruiters.

    If you have any queries on The University of Law, please feel free to keep in touch with us via Facebook and Twitter:

    Facebook
    Twitter

    Hope this helps!
    Hey guys,

    maybe a non-commercial post. I am in a similar situation. Have an LLB from continental Europe. You would definitely have to study the GDL because you wont have a qualifying law degree from an English or Welsh university.

    You would also need to obtain a Certificate of Academic Standing from the SRA once you obtained your French license. It will confirm that your degree is equivalent to a UK undergrad degree. The application process with the SRA is straightforward but takes a couple of weeks/months until you get your certificate. But it is free of charge.

    You can only get exemption if you have studied at least 4 modules out of the following: Public Law, Contract Law, Tort, Trusts, Property/Land, Criminal Law, European Law and other area of law. I obtained partial exemption because I did a couple of those modules at an English university.

    You can apply to any Law School - BPP and University of Law (previous poster - previously College of Law) are the most highly regarded by corporate law firms and some firms prescribe where you will have to study for the GDL and afterwards the LPC, others will leave you the choice. Please dont forget that those have university status but they are commercial (private) institutions. So basically there is no fierce competition for places, as long as you can pay the tuition. (This may give me negative rating from the previous poster but I will still say it: please seriously consider whether you apply to those and self-fund the GDL without having obtained a training contract before). The GDL is expensive and will not make you any more interesting to law firms in the UK. You normally apply to law firms for Training Contracts 2 years in advance (see thread on training contracts 2015 at the moment very active). It is very very competitive, especially since the market is down at the moment and even with good degrees from good universities people dont get training contracts. If you get one, your firm will pay the tuition and maintenance grant for law school... Dont expect it will save you time when you do the GDL self-funded because the firms are very strict on their recruitment cycles and they dont normally allow people to start their training contract until 2 years down the road (with few exceptions).

    If you havent studied in the UK before, it will be even more competitive for you to convince firms on the application form why they should hire you. A good (and almost indispensible) way at the moment is to do a vacation scheme with some of the firms. It is even more competitive because you can only accept 1 training contract but you can do several vacation schemes. For most firms it is their major source of recruitment.

    As for specialisation: You may have an interest in certain areas of law but during your 2 year training contract you will rotate seats normally every 6 months, so sitting in 4 different departments and gaiing experience in those. Normally firms dont want you to be too keen on one area because they cannot guarantee a seat in a certain department during your training, even though they take into account your preferences. So dont expect a very specific specialisation until the time you qualify.

    On the question of difficulty: I havent done the GDL yet but since the course is normally for people that didnt do a law degree, I would suggest having done one in another jurisdiction is already a massive advantage and will make it easier for you to adpat your legal thinking. Mostly the GDL is just a lot of work because you do 7 modules in 1 year which people normally study over the course of 2 years, so be prepared to work hard. However, it is still very practice focused, so dont expect university like academic discussions. I think if you do your work and pass the exams reasonably well, you are good.

    I hope this helps. I dont want to deter you two from going to the UK and doing it but I am currently fighting to get a training contract having done an overseas LLB and an Oxbridge LLM and I have a lot of trouble in getting interviews etc etc. You really have to want to do it otherwise, it will be a hard way to get there. I am not saying it is impossible, the market is just very competitive at the moment. I would suggest you have a look at lawcareers.net, they are really good and objective about how the whole process works. Also look at the training contract and vacation scheme threads here, it will give you an idea of how the whole thing works. Feel free to inbox me if you have questions...
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    (Original post by kenzalex1205)
    Hi everyone !
    Hi! Sorry that I can't actually help you with your dilemma but I'm just wondering if you could help me! How exactly does becoming qualified in law work in France? It is just that I came across this: http://master.sciences-po.fr/droit/en/content/courses and it seems to suggest that I can qualify (with my undergraduate degree) in French law in two years?
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    (Original post by Doc.Daneeka)
    Hi! Sorry that I can't actually help you with your dilemma but I'm just wondering if you could help me! How exactly does becoming qualified in law work in France? It is just that I came across this: http://master.sciences-po.fr/droit/en/content/courses and it seems to suggest that I can qualify (with my undergraduate degree) in French law in two years?
    True but beware of how hard it is to pass law school, and of course you'd have to get your stage afterwards too.

    Most people I know who want to do it are planning to qualify with a big international firm, then do a secondment to Paris during TC and then take the qualified lawyer transfer test. People do the Maitrise>stage route but it takes quite a bit longer.
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    (Original post by roh)
    True but beware of how hard it is to pass law school, and of course you'd have to get your stage afterwards too.

    Most people I know who want to do it are planning to qualify with a big international firm, then do a secondment to Paris during TC and then take the qualified lawyer transfer test. People do the Maitrise>stage route but it takes quite a bit longer.
    Thanks. Really I'm just checking my options but I am interested in the possibility of moving across to Europe (probably Belgium/Brussels or France/Paris) so I thought this might be an option. It sounds like getting in with a Scottish law firm that has an office in Belgium/France would be a better option.
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    If you have qualified outside the UK and want to practise in England and Wales, you'll need to look at the Qualified Lawyers Transfer Scheme.

    It's governed by the SRA - they have more information on this here: http://www.sra.org.uk/solicitors/qlts.page

    LawCareers.Net has a page on this, explaining the SRA recognised jurisdictions and the process you will have to go through: http://www.lawcareers.net/Solicitors...TransferScheme

    You might also want to look at the SRA's page on conversion courses and Certificates of academic standing: http://www.sra.org.uk/students/conversion-courses.page
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    Hi Sarcasm1000,

    It's great news that you're thinking of studying the GDL with us!

    As regards whether you should stay for your second Masters degree of 'droit des affaires internationales', this is your decision and it's important that you make the choice that's right for you.

    However, here are some useful points to bear in mind:

    1. It's correct that you can't specialise during the GDL, but you can specialise during your Legal Practice Course (LPC), which is the course that comes next if you want to become a solicitor in England and Wales.

    2. If you study your LPC at The University of Law, you will have the opportunity to select international elective modules, which include opportunities to gain knowledge of international business and commercial law. More information on our electives

    3. Our LPC is actually an LL.M LPC, so if you successfully complete the LPC and a Professional Practice Dissertation, you will be awarded a Masters degree in addition to the LPC. More information on our LL.M LPC

    We hope this helps and please let us know if we can assist with any further queries
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    (Original post by The University of Law)
    Hi Sarcasm1000,

    It's great news that you're thinking of studying the GDL with us!

    As regards whether you should stay for your second Masters degree of 'droit des affaires internationales', this is your decision and it's important that you make the choice that's right for you.

    However, here are some useful points to bear in mind:

    1. It's correct that you can't specialise during the GDL, but you can specialise during your Legal Practice Course (LPC), which is the course that comes next if you want to become a solicitor in England and Wales.

    2. If you study your LPC at The University of Law, you will have the opportunity to select international elective modules, which include opportunities to gain knowledge of international business and commercial law. More information on our electives

    3. Our LPC is actually an LL.M LPC, so if you successfully complete the LPC and a Professional Practice Dissertation, you will be awarded a Masters degree in addition to the LPC. More information on our LL.M LPC

    We hope this helps and please let us know if we can assist with any further queries
    Hi there,
    Thank you so much for your reply, it's exactly what I wanted to find out, I can't thank you enough!

    Just wanted to ask though, on the subject on funding my studies, am I right in thinking that student loans (where you don't pay until you start earning over a certain amount) will not be available to me?
    Also, I just wanted to check that there will be a guaranteed place on the LLM LPC granted obviously that I pass the GDL?

    Many kind regards
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    Hi Sarcasm100

    Glad to hear we've been of help!

    You can find out more about the funding options available for studying the GDL here.

    We can also confirm that if you successfully complete our GDL, you will have a guaranteed place on our LL.M LPC.

    Hope this help
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    Hi Kenza. I have a DEUG, Licence and Master 1 from Panthéon-Assas. For my M1 year I studied at UCL via the Erasmus program. Having been granted subject exemptions from the SRA, I am now completing the GDL at the University of Law. Inbox me if you have any query. Panthéon-Assas solidarity
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    I also have exemptions from Erasmus year and now going to BPP
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    Hello,
    quick question for the university of law,
    does having an LLM enables you to do the LPC without the GDL ?
 
 
 
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