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    One problem i always seem to have in looking for university courses is the 'percentage of students who agreed the course was interesting data'. When the data is low (i.e around 60%) does that suggest that the course is uninteresting?


    For example, UCL's Physics MSci course only has a 60% 'interesting' percentage compared to Lancasters 93%, does this mean the course at Lancaster is far more interesting? Or should you ignore this data?

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    (Original post by physicso)
    One problem i always seem to have in looking for university courses is the 'percentage of students who agreed the course was interesting data'. When the data is low (i.e around 60%) does that suggest that the course is uninteresting?


    For example, UCL's Physics MSci course only has a 60% 'interesting' percentage compared to Lancasters 93%, does this mean the course at Lancaster is far more interesting? Or should you ignore this data?

    Thanks
    The only bit of Unistats data you should be concerned with is degree class awarded. The higher the percentage of firsts awarded means that it's likely it's going to be easier to get the higher grades at that particular institution. This should be the number one most important thing when choosing a degree course.
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    I generally would take data that is based on students' responses with a pinch of salt.

    (Original post by Nichrome)
    The only bit of Unistats data you should be concerned with is degree class awarded. The higher the percentage of firsts awarded means that it's likely it's going to be easier to get the higher grades at that particular institution. This should be the number one most important thing when choosing a degree course.
    just a tad narrow minded.
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    (Original post by physicso)
    One problem i always seem to have in looking for university courses is the 'percentage of students who agreed the course was interesting data'. When the data is low (i.e around 60%) does that suggest that the course is uninteresting?


    For example, UCL's Physics MSci course only has a 60% 'interesting' percentage compared to Lancasters 93%, does this mean the course at Lancaster is far more interesting? Or should you ignore this data?

    Thanks
    Contentwise most courses are quitecomparable - pshyics is an established universal discipline, and whether eg a quantum mechanics module is interesting will depend more on the particular lecturer than on the chosen institution. Satisfaction will have to do more with accessibility of lecturers (open doors or not), perceived fairness of marking & feedback, class size, facilities, workload, etc.
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    (Original post by physicso)
    One problem i always seem to have in looking for university courses is the 'percentage of students who agreed the course was interesting data'. When the data is low (i.e around 60%) does that suggest that the course is uninteresting?


    For example, UCL's Physics MSci course only has a 60% 'interesting' percentage compared to Lancasters 93%, does this mean the course at Lancaster is far more interesting? Or should you ignore this data?

    Thanks
    I would be wary of this data, after all different Unis have different policies on people contributing to this, some make everyone do it, others its your own choice.

    I think the key thing is that if you are interested in the subject then it shouldn't matter if the lecturers voice is a little dreary? But it can have an effect. Honestly not 100% sure either way.
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    One aspect of the Unistats data is that it is based on a relatively small number of student's responses, eg 45 for Bristol Msci. In addition the people who are likely to reply are the ones who like to complain or are really nit-picky, so you are not getting a representative view. Also some universities may have a higher proportion of international students, who are paying much higher tuition fees who may expect more from the course.
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    (Original post by Allotropy)
    One aspect of the Unistats data is that it is based on a relatively small number of student's responses, eg 45 for Bristol Msci. In addition the people who are likely to reply are the ones who like to complain or are really nit-picky, so you are not getting a representative view. Also some universities may have a higher proportion of international students, who are paying much higher tuition fees who may expect more from the course.
    To qualify for the National Student Survey you need a response rate of over 50%. Since this feeds into most league tables, Universities are very keen that many students reply. The survey is based on final-year students only, which should explain the numbers.
 
 
 
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