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    Hi,

    When I drive down main roads and cars slow down ahead due to a red traffic light signal or pedestrian crossing, why can I select gear 1 bring my clutch fully up, brake and then speed up again without stalling?
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    What do you mean? As in, you downshift when slowing down, and then press the accelerator again without putting the clutch in?

    The car will only stall if you let the revs get too low. Usually cars stall below tickover which will be around 500 - 1000 rpm depending on what car you are in.
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    Could you reiterate the question
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    Not entirely sure what you mean, but if traffic is running slowly my car can go in 1st with no acceleration at a few mph with out stalling. As long as you don't brake too much or let the revs go too low it won't stall.
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    Also how do I move off quickly? I just find that a bit difficult.

    I think once that's sorted than I will feel more confident.
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    (Original post by po10tial)
    Also how do I move off quickly? I just find that a bit difficult.

    I think once that's sorted than I will feel more confident.
    Practice! Get your clutch control sorted and it will come naturally. First gear, clutch up to biting point, apply some throttle, and gradually add more throttle while lifting off the clutch. Once you get use to it you will be able to do it at less than 1200 revs regardless of incline


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    (Original post by 1992LP)
    Practice! Get your clutch control sorted and it will come naturally. First gear, clutch up to biting point, apply some throttle, and gradually add more throttle while lifting off the clutch. Once you get use to it you will be able to do it at less than 1200 revs regardless of incline


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    I tried doing it today and the car started jumping forwards and back if you know what I mean.

    I usually take some time for my car to move, because I rely solely on the clutch.

    So anyways, I select gear 1, get it to biting point, add some pressure to the gas and at the same time let go of the clutch?
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    (Original post by po10tial)
    I tried doing it today and the car started jumping forwards and back if you know what I mean.

    I usually take some time for my car to move, because I rely solely on the clutch.

    So anyways, I select gear 1, get it to biting point, add some pressure to the gas and at the same time let go of the clutch?
    If it is jumping forward then you are letting off the clutch too quick.

    Pretty much as you said below, feed in the gas and let off the clutch slowly at the same time and the car will move off smoothly. Kind of hard to explain on a forum but it will make sense when you practice it
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    (Original post by 1992LP)
    If it is jumping forward then you are letting off the clutch too quick.

    Pretty much as you said below, feed in the gas and let off the clutch slowly at the same time and the car will move off smoothly. Kind of hard to explain on a forum but it will make sense when you practice it
    If I do that, there is no way it will stall?

    Also, won't I crash into the vehicle ahead?

    When is it good to do gear changes?
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    (Original post by po10tial)
    If I do that, there is no way it will stall?

    Also, won't I crash into the vehicle ahead?

    When is it good to do gear changes?
    Once you get used to it you will be able to do it without stalling. Practice somewhere quiet first, if you let the clutch out slowly then the car won't jump forward.

    If you get it wrong and it does lurch forward then just press the clutch in again, you just need to get a feel for it.

    Depends on what car, assuming a normal small petrol car then change between 2000 - 3000 rpm. If you change up too soon then the revs will be low and the car will feel very sluggish. Not a problem if that happens, just change down again
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    (Original post by 1992LP)
    Once you get used to it you will be able to do it without stalling. Practice somewhere quiet first, if you let the clutch out slowly then the car won't jump forward.

    If you get it wrong and it does lurch forward then just press the clutch in again, you just need to get a feel for it.

    Depends on what car, assuming a normal small petrol car then change between 2000 - 3000 rpm. If you change up too soon then the revs will be low and the car will feel very sluggish. Not a problem if that happens, just change down again
    How does the clutch work?

    If I push it down fully, the car stops right?

    If I lift it up slowly, the car rolls?

    If I brake and then push the clutch in, the car comes to a complete stop?
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    (Original post by po10tial)
    How does the clutch work?

    If I push it down fully, the car stops right?

    If I lift it up slowly, the car rolls?

    If I brake and then push the clutch in, the car comes to a complete stop?
    The clutch basically connects the gearbox to the engine so that power can be transferred to the wheels.

    When the clutch is fully in, then there is no power at all going to the wheels.

    When you lift it up slowly (i.e. the "biting point") you are slowly applying power to the wheels.

    When you brake the rpm (engine speed) will drop, and you put the clutch in to avoid stalling. When coming to a complete halt aim to put the clutch in at around 1000 rpm.

    There is a little more to it than that, but thats pretty much the jist of it.
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    Slowing down for red lights ....

    Ease off and apply brake if necessary

    when speed gets to 10 mph or less then, if you think the lights may change, engage 1st gear fully and continue driving up to the light/queue
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    (Original post by 1992LP)
    The clutch basically connects the gearbox to the engine so that power can be transferred to the wheels.

    When the clutch is fully in, then there is no power at all going to the wheels.

    When you lift it up slowly (i.e. the "biting point") you are slowly applying power to the wheels.

    When you brake the rpm (engine speed) will drop, and you put the clutch in to avoid stalling. When coming to a complete halt aim to put the clutch in at around 1000 rpm.

    There is a little more to it than that, but thats pretty much the jist of it.
    1000rpm is probably a bit too low. Most cars will start to judder an begin to stall at 1000rpm - the car I drive would stall if I did that.
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    (Original post by sabian92)
    1000rpm is probably a bit too low. Most cars will start to judder an begin to stall at 1000rpm - the car I drive would stall if I did that.
    It will judder if you don't put enough gas on or let the clutch up too quickly.

    Has been fine on every car I have driven from a 1.2 Corsa to a Ferrari 360!
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    (Original post by alfalimaindia)
    Not entirely sure what you mean, but if traffic is running slowly my car can go in 1st with no acceleration at a few mph with out stalling. As long as you don't brake too much or let the revs go too low it won't stall.
    The engine doesn't turn off when the accelerator pedal isn't down, it has a minimum speed (tickover). So when you are in neutral it is still running just at very low power.

    When you have the clutch up, in first, that tickover is just enough to push the car to maintain a few mph, which is just above the rpm needed to prevent the car from stalling.

    It may be you could do it in second, at a higher speed - but the tickover might not be powerful enough to maintain the higher speed for that gear.
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    Protip: If you learn to drive with your knees you can hold a map at the same.
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    (Original post by po10tial)
    How does the clutch work?
    As the other poster said, it connects the turny bits in the engine to the wheels, forcing them to turn.

    The wheels can also force the engine to turn, for example going down hill in gear or slowing down coming up to traffic lights (with no accelerator pedal).

    A car stalls when the wheels are forcing the engine to a speed that is too low for it to sustain, and it cuts out (it judders first). So to prevent stalling you have to push the clutch down to let the engine run on its own, OR increase your accelerator to provide the engine some power, this will cause you to speed up to a speed it can sustain.

    (Original post by po10tial)
    If I push it down fully, the car stops right?
    You push it down when you stop, and the car can naturally roll to a halt (or just roll down a hill).

    (Original post by po10tial)
    If I lift it up slowly, the car rolls?
    When you lift it up the engine turns is connected to the wheels. So depending on how much power it has (tickover/accelerator) it will either stall because the wheels are turning too slow (high gear/very slow) OR drive the wheels to turn (low gear or engine with power)

    (Original post by po10tial)
    If I brake and then push the clutch in, the car comes to a complete stop?
    Yes, you disconnect the engine and stop the car. The engine will still be running at tickover but is not connected to the wheels.
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    (Original post by Hanvyj)
    The engine doesn't turn off when the accelerator pedal isn't down, it has a minimum speed (tickover). So when you are in neutral it is still running just at very low power.

    When you have the clutch up, in first, that tickover is just enough to push the car to maintain a few mph, which is just above the rpm needed to prevent the car from stalling.

    It may be you could do it in second, at a higher speed - but the tickover might not be powerful enough to maintain the higher speed for that gear.
    I know it doesn't turn off and I never drive in neutral.

    I know, that's what I was getting at.

    It's highly unlikely you can go 2-3mph in second in really slow traffic. The point of doing it in first with no acceleration is so you don't need to keep putting the clutch in and braking.
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    Basically, if you've got a diesel engine, you can start the car in 1st gear completely without any help of the throttle. This is mainly due to the engine's torque levels; i.e. diesel engines have more torque; hence stronger low gears, which is why you can start the car without adding power via the throttle as most other users have stated previously.


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