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    I am awful at maths, but I wish to pursue a career in physics.
    My problem that I don't understand, is the fact that my maths in physics is almost faultless, but my actual mathematics is, rather flawed.
    I have only just started GCSE but my primary sixth form choice requires at least an A in maths.
    God almighty, it annoys me.
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    You've got motivation to work hard at it then
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    (Original post by ThEpicOne007)
    I am awful at maths, but I wish to pursue a career in physics.
    My problem that I don't understand, is the fact that my maths in physics is almost faultless, but my actual mathematics is, rather flawed.
    I have only just started GCSE but my primary sixth form choice requires at least an A in maths.
    God almighty, it annoys me.
    I am fairly good in maths, however my physics maths sucks. I just don't know how to apply it, and it just doesn't go around my brain.
    Maths is easy My advice to you, would be do 20 minutes maths every day, thats what Debra medan??? did, i believe it was her. Gradually, as you get more used to it, it will become easier for you. It's just practice is all. The grade boundaries for maths are so low, you need about 60-70% of the test which is 60-70 marks for an A Don't worry about it! you'll be fine.
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    What I would do is focus on the basics first. Once you know how to do that move on to a harder topic. Once you have mastered a harder topic move on to another hard topic
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    (Original post by ThEpicOne007)
    I am awful at maths, but I wish to pursue a career in physics.
    My problem that I don't understand, is the fact that my maths in physics is almost faultless, but my actual mathematics is, rather flawed.
    I have only just started GCSE but my primary sixth form choice requires at least an A in maths.
    God almighty, it annoys me.
    Until university the maths in physics is fairly basic, consisting mostly of rearranging equations.
    However this is a problem as you have to be good at maths for physics
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    I know where you're coming from pal. When I started GCSE's I knew that I wanted to do Economics at uni and that it required maths. I sucked at maths.

    So then I found ways of learning maths fun and because I eventually found maths fun I was more motivated to revise it (I revised maths for at least an hour every day at least a month and a half leading up to the exams). I ended up getting an A in maths when I was realistically looking at getting a B.

    It can be done, just push yourself to fulfil your ambitions and you'll get there
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    Great advice from the guy above ^

    It can be done, don't instantly let it be a grudge. If think you suck at it right now, then luckily you do still have the time to change it.
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    (Original post by ThEpicOne007)
    I am awful at maths, but I wish to pursue a career in physics.
    My problem that I don't understand, is the fact that my maths in physics is almost faultless, but my actual mathematics is, rather flawed.
    I have only just started GCSE but my primary sixth form choice requires at least an A in maths.
    God almighty, it annoys me.
    You can fix it. I was in exactly the same position as you at the end of Year 9, I'm now in Year 11, and am taking Maths and Further Maths A-Levels next year.

    Get a CGP Revision guide if you can, use Khanacademy, youtube, BBC Bitesize, etc. Don't be embarrassed to learn basics (Long/short division, basic algebra manipulation, etc), because without these basics, everything seems harder.
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    Logic, blood, sweat and a few tears will do the trick


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    You're only 15, 16. In education you'll rushed and you'll be encouraged that you have to make choices now or you'll be a bum forever. Truth is, you don't even know what you want to do. What you want to do at 16 will likely change when you find out about the real world.

    I mean, what is this 'physics' you want to do? It's like saying you want a job helping customers, it could be so many things.

    Anyway, what interests you about physics might point you in the direction of another similar sector which you'll actually end up preferring.

    But if you do want a physics-based career but worry about your maths, just because you might think you suck now doesn't mean you will when you're a few years older and wiser. Anyone really can do maths, or anything else really, you only know what you learn. If you don't know basic maths, or slightly more complicated maths, it's because you've had bad teachers or the way you're 'learning' isn't suited to how you are.

    You may not go to sixth form, but that doesn't end your life. In fact you might end up better off.

    For comparison, at school I got a D in maths, I worked at Co-op and then was unemployed for 6 years. I went straight into college and did an I.T. course because I thought I wanted an I.T. career, then when I sucked at that because I was too young, I did media the next year until I realised I was wasting my time.

    However when I retook maths years later (right now), I got A* an A in my first tests. When I did astronomy GCSE, I got an A. I'm going to self-study A levels in the maths and physics field, and then go to university and end up with a PhD in astrophysics or similar (well, easier said than done eh?), and have multiple career choices by the end of it.

    Like a boss.
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    Funny thing is, i found GCSE maths harder than A level maths. In GCSE maths there are a ****load of easy topics, at A level there are fewer but harder topics; i prefer the latter.

    Therefore, what I think you should do is condense all of the topics in GCSE maths by summarizing example question and answers from each topic.

    BTW, I got a B in GCSE maths, but... A*A in maths and further maths A levels. Also got a grade 2 in STEP II. So im pretty strange, lol. I dont think i could get an A* in GCSE even now, tbh, i quit my tutoring role for GCSE (in gap year) because it was too difficult to learn all of that material, and ended up in retail :facepalm:.
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    (Original post by ThEpicOne007)
    I am awful at maths, but I wish to pursue a career in physics.
    My problem that I don't understand, is the fact that my maths in physics is almost faultless, but my actual mathematics is, rather flawed.
    I have only just started GCSE but my primary sixth form choice requires at least an A in maths.
    God almighty, it annoys me.
    Generally, people who say they are "awful at maths" simply have had awful teachers. tbh, almost anyone can succeed in maths up to A-level standard if they really tried.

    If you find that teaching standards for maths in your school are poor, or you're just not getting a particular topic, look up a video tutorial online. There are lots of great sites for maths video tutorials - I'd suggest examsolutions and maths247. khanacademy is excellent as well, but the videos there won't be exactly following your GCSE syllabus, so the former two would probably be better.

    After that, it's quite simple really - practice makes perfect. Do all the past papers you can. Odds are, if you can do all the past papers, you can do the real exam on the day as well. One thing you'll find with GCSE/A-level maths is that, once you've done so many questions, every question is going to start looking the same. This is because they basically are the same! GCSE and A-level exams are extremely repetitive. If you've done all the past papers, when you sit for the real thing, I can tell you that you will have done almost all (if not all) the questions before already - just with different numbers/values.
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    Another plus point is that you always assume the exam will be harder than it is (at GCSE anyway, can't speak for A Level). You'll open it up and there's barely 20 questions, some not relevant to the subject seemingly for the sake of having easy questions in there (English question in Maths, basic addition in algebra, wtf?).
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    They do need that requirement really - there is actually very little maths in school physics, but at university there is a lot.

    However, you have just started your GCSEs, and you are clearly intelligent because you are good at physics, so you have every chance of getting an A. As someone who self-taught maths from before GCSE, the advice I would give is;

    - Half of it is mental. Learning maths is like slowly untangling a massive piece of string - if you get stressed you end up completely tangled and confused, but if you are quietly confident (easier said than done), and take it one small step at a time, in a logical order, you can get through any amount of it you want.
    - It takes time to sink in. Sciences can often be learned the month before the exam, but maths can not.
    - The only way to learn is through practice. You might have to remember a couple of formulae (check the data sheet), but it is almost all about method. The only way to be sure of what method to use is to have done it a hundred times, and ironed out all the variations and details.

    Put very simply, pick up a textbook, start at the beginning, finish at the end. If you come to a problem, don't leave it, ask a teacher or use examples to solve it yourself. Finish with a few past papers. I can guarantee that if you do this thoroughly you have a very good chance of an A.
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    (Original post by ThEpicOne007)
    I am awful at maths, but I wish to pursue a career in physics.
    My problem that I don't understand, is the fact that my maths in physics is almost faultless, but my actual mathematics is, rather flawed.
    I have only just started GCSE but my primary sixth form choice requires at least an A in maths.
    God almighty, it annoys me.
    An awful lot of physics-maths can be done with the posh-sounding technique of dimensional analysis (known to us mere mortals as "juggling the units"). Basically you can work out all the formulae just by matching up the units - for example, given that G has units N m^2 / kg^2, you can instantly construct the formula \frac{G m_1 m_2}{r^2} = F where m_i are masses and r is a distance, since the thing on top of the fraction has units N m^2, the thing on the bottom has units m^2, so the whole thing has units N, which is the unit of force. (This formula is bound to be right up to a function of a unitless thing, so it might differ by a multiple of \frac{m_1}{m_2} from the actual formula, or by a constant - in this case it turns out not to.) Without even knowing what the formula means, you can shove an idea of a formula together, and if you know what it means (the gravitational force between two objects) then you can verify that it's correct (for instance, that r^2 is really r^2 and not r_1 r_2, because there's only one distance between two objects).
    If you just make sure you write units next to *everything*, even silly units like "5 bananas", then you can work things out. Simple example: A person eats five bananas every second, and eats for ten seconds; how many bananas has she eaten? Don't be tempted to write your answer as a number, because that tells you nothing. You're looking for an answer in bananas; you have the inputs "5 bananas/second"; "10 second", how can I combine them to make "bananas"? It's clear from looking at the units that you have to multiply them (since "banana/second * second = banana"). So the answer is 50 bananas.
    It's surprising just how far this technique gets you (at A-level and beyond!)
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    (Original post by Smaug123)
    An awful lot of physics-maths can be done with the posh-sounding technique of dimensional analysis (known to us mere mortals as "juggling the units"). Basically you can work out all the formulae just by matching up the units - for example, given that G has units N m^2 / kg^2, you can instantly construct the formula \frac{G m_1 m_2}{r^2} = F where m_i are masses and r is a distance, since the thing on top of the fraction has units N m^2, the thing on the bottom has units m^2, so the whole thing has units N, which is the unit of force. (This formula is bound to be right up to a function of a unitless thing, so it might differ by a multiple of \frac{m_1}{m_2} from the actual formula, or by a constant - in this case it turns out not to.) Without even knowing what the formula means, you can shove an idea of a formula together, and if you know what it means (the gravitational force between two objects) then you can verify that it's correct (for instance, that r^2 is really r^2 and not r_1 r_2, because there's only one distance between two objects).
    If you just make sure you write units next to *everything*, even silly units like "5 bananas", then you can work things out. Simple example: A person eats five bananas every second, and eats for ten seconds; how many bananas has she eaten? Don't be tempted to write your answer as a number, because that tells you nothing. You're looking for an answer in bananas; you have the inputs "5 bananas/second"; "10 second", how can I combine them to make "bananas"? It's clear from looking at the units that you have to multiply them (since "banana/second * second = banana"). So the answer is 50 bananas.
    It's surprising just how far this technique gets you (at A-level and beyond!)
    I'm sure he understood every single word of that...
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    (Original post by ozzyoscy)
    I'm sure he understood every single word of that...
    I even put in a nice easy example at the end it was meant to be taken with some background stuff on dimensional analysis, perhaps with a question to a physics teacher.
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    (Original post by Smaug123)
    I even put in a nice easy example at the end it was meant to be taken with some background stuff on dimensional analysis, perhaps with a question to a physics teacher.
    The guy's a kid in school, c'mon.
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    (Original post by ozzyoscy)
    The guy's a kid in school, c'mon.
    I explained it to my friends mid-AS year, and it would have been very useful to me to know earlier… (I only realised it was the same thing as dimensional analysis at the start of A2-year.)
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    (Original post by Smaug123)
    An awful lot of physics-maths can be done with the posh-sounding technique of dimensional analysis (known to us mere mortals as "juggling the units"). Basically you can work out all the formulae just by matching up the units - for example, given that G has units N m^2 / kg^2, you can instantly construct the formula \frac{G m_1 m_2}{r^2} = F where m_i are masses and r is a distance, since the thing on top of the fraction has units N m^2, the thing on the bottom has units m^2, so the whole thing has units N, which is the unit of force. (This formula is bound to be right up to a function of a unitless thing, so it might differ by a multiple of \frac{m_1}{m_2} from the actual formula, or by a constant - in this case it turns out not to.) Without even knowing what the formula means, you can shove an idea of a formula together, and if you know what it means (the gravitational force between two objects) then you can verify that it's correct (for instance, that r^2 is really r^2 and not r_1 r_2, because there's only one distance between two objects).
    If you just make sure you write units next to *everything*, even silly units like "5 bananas", then you can work things out. Simple example: A person eats five bananas every second, and eats for ten seconds; how many bananas has she eaten? Don't be tempted to write your answer as a number, because that tells you nothing. You're looking for an answer in bananas; you have the inputs "5 bananas/second"; "10 second", how can I combine them to make "bananas"? It's clear from looking at the units that you have to multiply them (since "banana/second * second = banana"). So the answer is 50 bananas.
    It's surprising just how far this technique gets you (at A-level and beyond!)
    very helpful! I am an Alevel Mathematics and Physics student and your analogy will even help me in Physics

    I doubt the 15 year kid would understand the first part (Because I don't :lol:) All I know is that it's Newtons inverse square law on gravity.
 
 
 
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