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    Hey guys, this is to anyone who is doing one, or has done one, but I just had a few inquiries:

    1) I've been looking at some online (the ones published on the Bristol University website in particular) and on nearly every single one, the introductions are really long, some are 7+ pages. I've done some research and it says that introductions should roughly be 1000 words. I know this is subjective, but I'm struggling how much to dedicate to my introduction? I'm leaving this till last, but I've already done about 400 words of that.

    2) How many chapters? Again, I know this depends. But originally I set out to do 3, but I'm thinking I'll only have chance to do 2. I've amalgamated my final chapter as a sub heading of chapter 2

    I'm already over 7,000 (the max is 10,000) and I still have to finish my chapter 2 and conclusion, as well as completing my introduction.

    So, anyone else had these problems? It's difficult to dedicate a certain amount of words to one section as I need to take into account footnotes/end notes which do take up a lot of the word count!

    Thanks
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    Check what guidelines your own Uni has about Dissertations - the format is different at different Unis, so dont get worried about slavishly trying to copy the format from another Uni.

    Think of it as 3 x 3,000 word essays (ie. 3 chapters) plus a 500 word Intro and a 500 word conclusion. Or it may work better as 4 shorter chapters - you decide. Two long chapters might seem over wordy, and over descriptive - but only you can judge this. The Introduction introduces the structure of your thesis - 'this is the question/problem, and this is how I'm going to answer it' - briefly explain what each of the three/four chapters will show, make it look like a logical process clearly pointing out the steps in presenting your evidence. The conclusion sums up what you've said (just like an essay conclusion). Keep it crisp and simple - cut out all waffle, and anything that doesnt help answer the basic question.

    If you get in a real muddle, ask someone you trust to read it and see if they think the structure works. Your tutor is also there to help - take what you've written to them and listen to their advice.
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    Out of interest what uni are you studying at and what is the topic of your dissertation?


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