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    Hi all,

    So I posted in one of the 'mature students' threads that I've applied to go and do an access course this year and university after that. I'll be 23 when I start college so will be 26/27 when I leave university.

    I'm currently working in an ok job, I don't really love it though haven't been in it that long and if I was to work my way up I could earn decent money. The thing I'm worried about is if I go to university I'll give up a typical mid 20's lifestyle. I'm not too sure if it makes sense but me and my best mate always talked of being in our mid 20s, being young professionals, living in a nice apartment living that sort of lifestyle and I keep seeing university as me stuck studying all week, working all weekend trying to get through, not having much free time and missing out. On the other hand I know university could lead to some brilliant new friendships and other things and ultimately give me the chance to do a job I think I'd be really good at and like to do.

    I'm very much an over thinker and realise that this isn't really a question, more my thoughts typed in on a public forum but if anyone does have any advice then feel free to share.

    Cheers
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    Age is just a number do all of that stuff when you're a bit older it doesn't matter. Besides its only 5 years not 10 or 15.

    Also you'll likely have a much better life after getting a degree (providing its not something pointless like history).
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    True, guess I get that idea of life due to the usual social ideals. I'm looking at studying english or some form of education degree as I'd like to be a teacher. I've previously worked in a school which is where I realised I quite liked working with kids.

    I guess it's worth investing a bit of time now to work towards enjoying the next 30-40 years of my life after university rather than hoping I can get on and enjoy it for what it is now.
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    (Original post by RtGOAT)
    Age is just a number do all of that stuff when you're a bit older it doesn't matter. Besides its only 5 years not 10 or 15.

    Also you'll likely have a much better life after getting a degree (providing its not something pointless like history).
    Only a delusional young person would say that. If you think someone in their mid twenties will have the energy and enthusiasm of a young student, then you are in for a surprise. People's bodies and capabilities change as they get older.
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    Just do what you want to do OP. *******s to everything else.
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    I would go for it, plenty of people do it and it doesn't make them any different to anybody else. I'm also doing an access course to get into uni, and many of the people (if not most of them) are much older than 23.

    I wouldn't even call 23 old to go to uni. You'll only be a few years older than everybody else and people will see past it. I also think you would actually probably work harder for your degree than the people who go to un straight from school. There was a study on this at my uni, and that was very much the case!

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    You get different things out of education at different times in your life. I did A-levels when I was younger, went on to work full time in a school in a support role in the science department, worked there for 8 years and was promoted lots - HOWEVER......I knew I could do more, and I was bored and wanted more out of life for myself. I'm just finishing my Access course. I've achieved nothing but distinctions all of the way through the course, and made some great friends. I was never top of the class at school - I wasn't focused on what I wanted to do, and it was just something that you did because everyone else was doing it. However, the older you get, the more you realise that you have to get something back out of what you're doing. It has to feel worthwhile to you. Money is cool, but if you are bored or KNOW you can do more then just go for it.

    You'll still have a social life - okay you won't have as much money, and you'll have work to do, but you'll be doing the work with new friends, meeting all sorts of people and broadening your experience, and coming out of it with better work prospects and feeling good about what you've achieved. Go for it! Doesn't matter what other people think - you'll have a new network of friends who are all doing the same thing, for the same reasons and they will support you.

    I'm 33 and just going back to Uni - it's brilliant! No I've not got energy to go clubbing, but them my priorities have changed as i've gotten older. That's fine - you pick and choose what you take out of University, and everyone is their own person. Just be you, enjoy it!
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    (Original post by sherriff)
    Hi all,

    So I posted in one of the 'mature students' threads that I've applied to go and do an access course this year and university after that. I'll be 23 when I start college so will be 26/27 when I leave university.

    Cheers
    A good friend of mine is a mature student (~28), going from military background to the university lifestyle.

    He said the difficult thing is the first year, a lot of people are very much fresh faced and eager. But they also lack a lot of the experience you will have had, I understand this being 21; if you like luxury then you may be in for a shock as most of your new friends wouldn't have the same sort of money you will have.

    I think the trick is to do what you truly love; if you think about this subject a lot and have a genuine interest then go for it. But if your just thinking of doing it to enhance career prospects, then it will be a bit of an uphill fight.

    Also a proper 9-5 job is 100x what university is; I have experienced both and I can tell you that you should have no problems with the workload, albeit you might be a bit rusty at the start and so will need to catch up somewhat.

    Hope that helped!!
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    (Original post by RtGOAT)
    Age is just a number do all of that stuff when you're a bit older it doesn't matter. Besides its only 5 years not 10 or 15.

    Also you'll likely have a much better life after getting a degree (providing its not something pointless like history).
    What have you got against history, what about all the properly pointless subjects you could have picked on for that dumb thread:rolleyes:
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    Thanks for all the awesome responses guys. I have had confirmation I have a place on my access to teaching course and an appointment to meet the course tutor next week. My main thing has been me worrying about where I'll be living etc etc in a couple of years time but I'm an over thinker and realise I just need to not worry about that right now, take it for what it is and decide on that sort of stuff as and when it comes around. I'm definitely going to go for it, I really want to experience university and not the dread of waking up at 7 every day, looking forward to the clock hitting 5:30 and getting back. I was quite a bright kid in school but really lost interest and didn't do as well as I could have so I think going back to uni will give me the chance to switch that button back on and get stuck into some learning!
 
 
 
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