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Do you cut your rabbits nails? Watch

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    Do you cut your rabbits nails?
    Are you supposed to? :confused:
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    My rabbits nails always seem to end up scratching me I took him to vets she said they weren't long just sharp he trimmed them for £8.00 you have to becareful because If you hit a blood vessel they can bleed to death x


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    I have 2 lionhead rabbits, a boy and a girl and as long as they have plenty of stimulation with toys, salt blocks, wood, etc their nails should file down themselves. If you get concerned take them to a vet because, as previously mentioned, it's very risky doing it yourself. Good luck! :bunny:
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    i take mine to the vets every 6 months or so to get them done, they both hate it but their nails grow so quickly, the vets did say we could do it ourselves but one doesnt like being held and the other doesnt like being touched at all (both rescue rabbits) but the vets only charge £5 each so isnt too bad
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    bite them
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    I work at a vets and we don't get too many rabbits in for nail clips, but some of them need doing occasionally. If you go in, the vet/nurse should be happy to show you how to hold the rabbit safely if you want to attempt it yourself, though often it's probably best to get someone experienced to do it as they can be a little unpredictable and jumpy! that's when you risk cutting the quick of the nail and causing some bleeding.
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    if the nail is protruding past the fur then they probably need clipping. It should be quite easy to see the quick, unless your rabbits have dark nails in which case you can shine a torch underneath the nail first.
    We use dog claw clippers to do ours as the small pet ones are useless.

    also, just in response to a couple of the other comments;
    rabbits have absolutely no need for salt blocks and the high calcium content can cause bladder sludge and stones so it's best not to give them.
    Whether you rescue your rabbits or buy babies, the chances are they will hate being picked up - it's just their natural instincts.
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    I cut my rabbits nails once every 2/3months - he's white and his nails are clear so I can see where his blood vessels are. get help with it though as its fiddly!!
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    You should probably get them cut every couple of months, especially if you have an indoor rabbit. I do my rabbit's nails myself but I'm taking an animal management course so it would probably be easier for you to get them done at your local vets or pets at home (only some stores do it though). Hope this helps!
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    (Original post by bdeans)
    My rabbits nails always seem to end up scratching me I took him to vets she said they weren't long just sharp he trimmed them for £8.00 you have to becareful because If you hit a blood vessel they can bleed to death x


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    This is ridiculous. They will not bleed to death.
    OP, if your rabbit doesn’t have anything that will wear their nails down then yes, they will need clipping. A set of clippers made for small dog nails will do. I find it easier to do with one person holding the rabbit and the other doing the clipping. If you rabbit is not good with handling then it may be best to go to your vet.

    I also cannot stress the importance of going to a RABBIT SAVVY vet enough. There are a few rabbit internet forums around and you can ask there for recommendations of one in your area.
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    (Original post by Talya)
    This is ridiculous. They will not bleed to death.
    OP, if your rabbit doesn’t have anything that will wear their nails down then yes, they will need clipping. A set of clippers made for small dog nails will do. I find it easier to do with one person holding the rabbit and the other doing the clipping. If you rabbit is not good with handling then it may be best to go to your vet.

    I also cannot stress the importance of going to a RABBIT SAVVY vet enough. There are a few rabbit internet forums around and you can ask there for recommendations of one in your area.
    A rabbit will just be very sore and stressed if you nick the quick - do not expect them to cooperate after you've done that to them. Cornflour works as a good coagulant for blood if you ever do nick a quick however!

    Small dog clippers are a good choice. You can also choose to file your bun's nails if they are that instant on not being touched and it's just the odd one or two nails that are long. Vet's dont usually charge much (it's just under £7 for us) and they SHOULD know what they're doing.

    Our vet is great with our rabbits. It's Vets4Pets in Warrington. Cannot recommend them enough!
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    (Original post by Charlottelt)
    I have 2 lionhead rabbits, a boy and a girl and as long as they have plenty of stimulation with toys, salt blocks, wood, etc their nails should file down themselves. If you get concerned take them to a vet because, as previously mentioned, it's very risky doing it yourself. Good luck! :bunny:
    Meep. Don't give them salt licks or calcium blocks. Too much calcium is a huge problem for buns - they make plenty on their own! Salt isn't needed either. Give them a balance PELLET diet with plenty of fresh fruits and veggies and most importantly HAY and you should be all good.

    They should be eating their own body size in hay a day!
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    (Original post by Mayden)
    Meep. Don't give them salt licks or calcium blocks. Too much calcium is a huge problem for buns - they make plenty on their own! Salt isn't needed either. Give them a balance PELLET diet with plenty of fresh fruits and veggies and most importantly HAY and you should be all good.

    They should be eating their own body size in hay a day!
    The blocks I give were recommended to me by the vets and pets at home. They only ever have one on the hutch and it lasts them months. This is the sort of thing I mean:

    http://www.petsathome.com/shop/fruit...appy-pet-58802

    They only ever have pellet food so they can't pick and choose which bits they want to eat which some other "mixed" foods offer. Also plenty of fruit and veg, hay for food, straw for warmth is given to them. We don't overload the fruit and veg though because some can contain a lot of sugar for rabbits, especially things like bananas.
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    (Original post by Charlottelt)
    The blocks I give were recommended to me by the vets and pets at home. They only ever have one on the hutch and it lasts them months. This is the sort of thing I mean:

    http://www.petsathome.com/shop/fruit...appy-pet-58802

    They only ever have pellet food so they can't pick and choose which bits they want to eat which some other "mixed" foods offer. Also plenty of fruit and veg, hay for food, straw for warmth is given to them. We don't overload the fruit and veg though because some can contain a lot of sugar for rabbits, especially things like bananas.
    Carrots, broccoli, cabbage are all pretty bad too. Carrots are high in sugars and broccoli and cabbage make for gassy rabbits which can lead to GI Stasis!

    Unless you've got a vet who specialises in rabbits and such I'd take what he says with a pinch of salt. You'll be providing your bun with enough of the good stuff from his hay, his fresh fruits/veggies and his pellets.
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    (Original post by Mayden)
    Unless you've got a vet who specialises in rabbits and such I'd take what he says with a pinch of salt. You'll be providing your bun with enough of the good stuff from his hay, his fresh fruits/veggies and his pellets.
    ditto.
    Mineral blocks are an outdated practice which goes back to when people didn't have complete foods to give their rabbits. They are more likely to do harm than good to a well cared for rabbit with a proper diet.
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    (Original post by Dr.Wannabe)
    Do you cut your rabbits nails?
    Are you supposed to? :confused:
    Indoor rabbits should generally have their nails clipped every two months. If they're overgrown it can be very uncomfortable and even painful for the rabbit. Rabbits should not have salt or mineral licks. All they need is hay and a small amount of pellets once a day and of course water. Rabbits are prey animals so most do not enjoy being picked up.
 
 
 
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