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    I heard that you can do a post graduate in any field you like. So if you had a physics Bsc, you could then do a post grad in English Literature etc. (even if you haven't done it since GCSEs). HOw can this be? Especially in the science world? How cold someone with a Computer Science degree do possibly perform at the same standard in a Chemistry postgraduate course as someone with e Chemistry Bsc? Or do you have to do foundations years/take longer on the course? Because the person I was speaking to said that you could do the un-related post grad masters in the same (1 year) frame time?

    I don't know much about postgrads and I may be way off the mark, but any advice?

    Thanks
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    (Original post by cawthorne)
    I heard that you can do a post graduate in any field you like. So if you had a physics Bsc, you could then do a post grad in English Literature etc. (even if you haven't done it since GCSEs). HOw can this be? Especially in the science world? How cold someone with a Computer Science degree do possibly perform at the same standard in a Chemistry postgraduate course as someone with e Chemistry Bsc? Or do you have to do foundations years/take longer on the course? Because the person I was speaking to said that you could do the un-related post grad masters in the same (1 year) frame time?

    I don't know much about postgrads and I may be way off the mark, but any advice?

    Thanks
    It can't be done in most sciences, in fact most technical degrees, So you would be unlikely to get a place on a language Masters without speaking that language to near fluent level etc. However, some Masters degrees are suitable for people with related skills, wanting to move areas, so for example, to do a Masters in International Relations you could probably put in a competitive application with a first degree in IR, politics, history, law and quite possibly geography, sociology, any languages, English, economics etc

    So some Masters degrees require a very specific undergrad degree, some will take a very wide range of almost any degree, and all combinations in between, depending on the subject and the content of the degree.
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    So if you did want to do a Masters, which required a specific undergrad you would have to do the 3 year undergrad course to do it? Or could you skip the first year since it normally doesn't count anyway?

    Say if I had a Computer Science undergrad Degree and I wanted to do a post grad in Electronic engineering or physics say?
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    (Original post by cawthorne)
    So if you did want to do a Masters, which required a specific undergrad you would have to do the 3 year undergrad course to do it? Or could you skip the first year since it normally doesn't count anyway?
    Whilst the first year of an undergrad degree usually doesn't count towards your final mark, its content is intended as a foundation for the following two years. You can sometimes skip one or even two years of a degree course and come in as a direct entrant later in the course. However in order to do so, you have to show that you already know the majority of the content in the years that you're skipping.

    If you were coming to an undergrad degree with no previous knowledge of the subject, then you couldn't manage years two and three if you didn't take year one.
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    (Original post by cawthorne)
    So if you did want to do a Masters, which required a specific undergrad you would have to do the 3 year undergrad course to do it? Or could you skip the first year since it normally doesn't count anyway?

    Say if I had a Computer Science undergrad Degree and I wanted to do a post grad in Electronic engineering or physics say?
    No you couldn't skip the first year, the exams may not count in some University marking schemes, but the knowledge certainly will!

    If you did some CS degrees and took certain modules I guess you could do certain EE Masters degrees, but I doubt you could do many if any Physics Masters (though they are usually more specific than Physics). They key is what modules you have done in the undergrad and what modules/specialism is available in the Masters. You really can't judge all that much before the second year of your undergrad degree.
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    There are universities that are now offering conversion masters, meaning they are aimed at students from a variety of backgrounds. Depending on the course, some require certain relevant skills, either linked to your undergraduate degree or profession, whilst others require very little background knowledge.

    These courses then offer intensive modules to get you up to speed, and there are even some that are longer than 1 year full time. There are some Engineering masters that are available, especially in certain speciality areas that would be seen as related to Computer Science or Physics. Psychology/Neuroscience is another area that offers conversions. Typically though, it's the Social Science and Humanities that are most flexible. Computer Science and IT conversion Masters have become quite popular, as well as Psych.

    If you have a specific area in mind and gave some details, you might be able to get a more precise answer.
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    Deoends on the subject. Going from a physics undergrad to a chemistry postgrad would be feasible, since there is a lot of overlap. Similarly going from mathematics into (e.g.) computer science or (computational/statistical) biology would be fine. And vice versa. But going into a subject where there is no overlap at all (e.g. physics to english literature) probably isn't feasible, since you are starting from the bottom. You do sometimes find masters courses which are aimed at people with very little previous exposure to the subject, but these are quite rare. Apart from those, you would probably need to take undergrad level classes on your own, and then apply for a masters afterwards.
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    (Original post by cawthorne)
    Say if I had a Computer Science undergrad Degree and I wanted to do a post grad in Electronic engineering or physics say?
    It would depend on the specifics. You probably aren't qualified to do theoretical physics for example, But if you were doing (e.g.) computational physics, or robotics (in EE) then there may be enough overlap for it to be fine. In practice, it may come down to how much mathematics you know; some compsci degrees are quite weak on mathematical content and don't teach much beyond formal logic and discrete math. In this case, you may struggle with a physics masters unless you were able to study things like multivariate calculus and ODEs/PDEs beforehand, to catch up.

    If you think you want to switch STEM fields, I would guess the most useful thing to do is try to increase your transferable skills (which generally means mathematical knowledge, and computer programming ability), and try to take some relevant modules in the field you're interested in to gain subject specific knowledge.
 
 
 
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