C1 question Watch

ixnayonthehombre
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#1
Report Thread starter 12 years ago
#1
I know the gradient of a line can be found by m = y2 - y1/x2 - x1 (or something along those lines), but i read in my textbook "when the same scale is used on both axes, m = tan theta. What does this mean? Thanks
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Dickie
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it means that when you have the same scale on both axes (eg both go 1,2,3,4... etc in the same way, or each "square" on graph paper represents the same amount on both axes), then the gradient is the tan of the angle between the line and the x axis.

This is because tan(angle) = opposite/adjacent, which is the same as the gradient.
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Coolraj
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I thought you finished you C1 exam!?!
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graveyarddreams
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#4
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yeah. imagine a right- angle triangle. x axis as the adjacent, vertical line as the opposite, the gradient (m) is the hypp, then m= tan theta, theta being the angle m makes with the x axis. But the scale has to be the same, like in a triangle, when you ty to work out a side, they all have to be in the same scale.
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