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    Had a debate today with someone online and it made me think - what do the younger generation think when it comes to voting?

    Assuming you are old enough to vote, would you? If not, why wouldn't you vote?

    Now, the argument put forward by earlier to by this someone was:

    "...I had no faith in labours current leadership, I knew the Lib Dems were full of BS, I called the tories on cutting legitamate benefits whilst giving corporate tax relief to their own businesses and buddies (which means the country only lost money) aaaaand I am not a racist so none of the smaller parties at the time appealed to me..."

    Whereas I completely disagree with the notion that people would refuse to vote- for many reasons. But I want to hear what TSR thinks on it. Go.


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    If you don't vote then you can't complain when the government does something you don't like.
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    (Original post by St. Brynjar)
    If you don't vote then you can't complain when the government does something you don't like.
    I completely agree!
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    If there was a general election tomorrow I'd spoil my vote. None of the parties represent what I want.

    I know some people vote UKIP or BNP to show their frustration with the main parties but I don't particularly like that.
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    (Original post by St. Brynjar)
    If you don't vote then you can't complain when the government does something you don't like.
    Yes you can.

    Not voting can be a vote in itself i.e. you disagree with all the MPs standing in your area and thus choose not to vote for any of them. Why would this stop me complaining about a government doing something you don't like?

    If anything, not voting gives you more right to complain- you didn't vote because XYZ said they'd do ABC. Now XYZ are doing ABC, you've every right to complain about it.
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    (Original post by Rooster523)
    Yes you can.

    Not voting can be a vote in itself i.e. you disagree with all the MPs standing in your area and thus choose not to vote for any of them. Why would this stop me complaining about a government doing something you don't like?

    If anything, not voting gives you more right to complain- you didn't vote because XYZ said they'd do ABC. Now XYZ are doing ABC, you've every right to complain about it.
    Voting is the chance to give your opinion and make yourself heard. If you forgo the chance to oppose a government you don't like then you also forgo the credibility of your argument. If there are no parties or independents that stand for you then I suggest you either stand yourself, or spoil your ballot.
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    I'm not going to vote in the local elections and this is a conscious decision - I don't know anything about the policies of the parties in my local area and making an uninformed choice based on general feeling or "I'm a student and must be a liberal" is a lot worse than not voting.

    If you don't vote you can't really complain about the government, but actually in both the places I could vote at the moment my vote would make no difference come general election time. I come from one of the safest conservative seats at home and Cambridge, while less secure, is pretty heavily libdem.
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    (Original post by Rooster523)
    Yes you can.

    Not voting can be a vote in itself i.e. you disagree with all the MPs standing in your area and thus choose not to vote for any of them. Why would this stop me complaining about a government doing something you don't like?

    If anything, not voting gives you more right to complain- you didn't vote because XYZ said they'd do ABC. Now XYZ are doing ABC, you've every right to complain about it.
    Yes that's all fair but by not voting it isn't helping to highlight problems on party policy- people don't know you didn't vote for that reason. Currently and unfortunately not all parties will plan to do all the xs and ys that you support.

    But isn't it better to vote for someone who you 'agree most with' than to potentially just let the person or party you disagree most with in? You're not doing anything to stop the things you're complaining about! I find it hard to believe that someone could disagree with every mp and every party policy going equally.
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    (Original post by Rob da Mop)
    I'm not going to vote in the local elections and this is a conscious decision - I don't know anything about the policies of the parties in my local area and making an uninformed choice based on general feeling or "I'm a student and must be a liberal" is a lot worse than not voting.

    If you don't vote you can't really complain about the government, but actually in both the places I could vote at the moment my vote would make no difference come general election time. I come from one of the safest conservative seats at home and Cambridge, while less secure, is pretty heavily libdem.

    If everyone just thinks "oh , my vote won't count anyway" how will we get anywhere! You're helping the people you disagree with win with a higher majority than is actually the case!
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    (Original post by play_fetch)
    If everyone just thinks "oh , my vote won't count anyway" how will we get anywhere! You're helping the people you disagree with win with a higher majority than is actually the case!
    I almost certainly WILL vote come general election time, I just think safe seats are a very prevalent reason for apathy towards voting.

    PR ftw.
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    (Original post by Rob da Mop)
    I almost certainly WILL vote come general election time, I just think safe seats are a very prevalent reason for apathy towards voting.

    PR ftw.
    If more people voted smaller parties rather than abstaining surely would help toward providing an undeniable proof that FPTP isn't truly representative. I personally think PR would lead to more problems anyway.
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    (Original post by St. Brynjar)
    Voting is the chance to give your opinion and make yourself heard. If you forgo the chance to oppose a government you don't like then you also forgo the credibility of your argument. If there are no parties or independents that stand for you then I suggest you either stand yourself, or spoil your ballot.
    Spoiling your ballot is exactly the same as not voting?!

    And standing yourself? Yeah everyone's got £500 to chuck down the drain
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    I live in the 4th safest Tory seat in the country and am very much looking forward to voting for a candidate who stands no chance of winning, you only get to do it once every 5 years!
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    (Original post by Rooster523)
    Spoiling your ballot is exactly the same as not voting?!

    And standing yourself? Yeah everyone's got £500 to chuck down the drain
    It really isn't. Spoiling your ballot is a form of protest where you make it clear you aren't happy with any of the candidates. Not turning up makes you look lazy. Spoiled ballot is a vote in itself, it's making an effort rather than accepting the status quo. You get one chance every five years to voice your political opinion, not voting is pointless in my opinion. I'm personally really excited about getting to vote in the local elections.
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    (Original post by St. Brynjar)
    It really isn't. Spoiling your ballot is a form of protest where you make it clear you aren't happy with any of the candidates. Not turning up makes you look lazy. Spoiled ballot is a vote in itself, it's making an effort rather than accepting the status quo. You get one chance every five years to voice your political opinion, not voting is pointless in my opinion. I'm personally really excited about getting to vote in the local elections.
    It really is. A vote not cast is just as valuable as a spoiled ballot. Sure, a spoiled ballot is more symbolic but is just as legit as not turning up.

    If I don't care for any candidates, I wouldn't waste my precious time on them.
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    I used to be 100% of the opinion, "You must vote if you want to complain". I'm not so sure now. I think at either the last general or local election I watched coverage of, I was shocked to see that spoilt ballots were counted as non-votes. So someone who actively goes to make a protest vote is lumped in with voter apathy. Combined with the huge amount of safe seats, I can understand someone not voting now.
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    Even if you don't fully agree with any, you should vote for the lesser of evils (in your opinion). I can't say I'd vote for current Labour or Lib Dem, for various reasons. Tories worry me because they might wreck the hospitals and schools, but they are doing a lot of other things well, so if I could vote, that's what I'd do.

    My point is: no party will be ideal for you, but if no-one votes due to this, except the rage voters, then BNP will be in power, and we are all screwed. You should at least try to find the "least worst" party.


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    I find that it varies some young people like myself follow politics regularly and understand it, we will vote. Others completely blank politics they refuse to discuss it, pay attention to it or even acknowledge it these are the main section of non voters. Then there is the dangerous section, the people that watch a segment on the news about something political every month or so. These are the people that will probably vote that actually have no idea about politics. All you will hear from them is "did you see boris johnson do the basketball shot i want to vote for him". I would rather have a non voter than someone who votes based on a basketball shot.
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    So you can tell your self that you have a choice, when in actual fact you dont.
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    (Original post by TheJoshwha)
    Even if you don't fully agree with any, you should vote for the lesser of evils (in your opinion). I can't say I'd vote for current Labour or Lib Dem, for various reasons. Tories worry me because they might wreck the hospitals and schools, but they are doing a lot of other things well, so if I could vote, that's what I'd do.

    My point is: no party will be ideal for you, but if no-one votes due to this, except the rage voters, then BNP will be in power, and we are all screwed. You should at least try to find the "least worst" party.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    You sound like the typical voter politically illiterate you are what i label the 'danger voter'. The one that votes based on newspaper headlines and short youtube clips. I would have have a non voter than someone that votes based on hearsay and basketball shots.
 
 
 
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