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    I have a male rabbit, who his a funny little chap I got him from the adoption centre at pets at home I've had him
    Months now he's quite a large rabbit although it bothers me cause he isn't affection as my old rabbit he doesn't really like being picked up and I was debating weather I should get him anther rabbit to play with but I would be scared incase he hurt the other rabbit, he always seems happy to see me when he's out in his run he twitches and jumps in air but soon as I go to pick him up he runs away, why can't he be more affectionate or any tips what I should do?


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    My rabbit is like that, I think though getting another rabbit could cause conflict because your rabbit has been on his own since you got him so bringing another rabbit in could cause him to get defensive. He might just be a bit timid, my female rabbit used to go mental if i tried to lift her after putting her outside. She used to attack me for trying to lift her and when I get her another rabbit they fought.
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    Yeah it's like a no win situation, just wish he was a bit more affectionate that's all! But thanks for info xx


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    I have 9 rabbits (7 from birth+mum+dad) and they don't really care much for human attention so I tend to leave them alone with each other. I had my two boys castrated and I've noticed that they are more relaxed now and they even live with each other with the girls in one large area. Before castration, they were vicious with each other and had to be separated (and of course from the girls!).

    Your bun may well benefit from a friend, and a girl would be the wisest choice, I'd say. A spayed female would be even better. You could try another boy, but he would have to be castrated if you don't want to find bits of rabbit all over your garden. Boys tend to take longer to gel, and sometimes never do, despite being neutered. You will find though, that if you do give your bun a companion, they will probably take less of an interest in you. Would be good though, as rabbits are really social.


    EDIT: Oh...and it will take time for two rabbits to get used to each other. One way I did it with boys was to keep one in hutch and one in the run where the hutch was so they could sniff each other through mesh. After a week, I let them run around for a bit but they got into a scuff so put them in separate hutches. Next morning, rabbits had chewed their way out of both hutches and were running around happily with the girls and have got onwellever since. Seems like the boys just had to have it out at first before living harmoniously. It's scary to see, but you can tell when things look serious enough to separate.

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    It's best not to mix them unless they've grown up together (I have a brother and a sister) as they can become defensive, especially the boys. As for affection, try getting him to sit near you by putting a treat near you and pop your hand beside him to let him smell you and get used to you first. Once he's hand a good lil sniff of you, try stroking him a lil on his back. He'll probably run away first time however keep this up and he should get used to being stroked. I find my girl rabbit more affectionate than the boy however I still pick him up for cuddles now and then since they have to be brushed (long haired lionhead rabbits get very tatty!)
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    Rabbits on the whole aren't keen on being picked up. The height frightens them. People seem to imagine all bunnies are cute and cuddly and love being held, but this often isn't the case at all! You can try "training" him to trust you more by stroking and holding him on the ground first rather than just lifting him a few feet in the air straight off. Take it slow and let him know you're not going to drop him basically, just as I'm sure you'd like a giant to treat you when lifting you 4/5 times your height into the air
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    I've only had one rabbit (out of three) who liked to be picked up. My latest rabbit was the friendliest thing out and would sniff around you on the grass but hated being picked up. I think it's just part of their personalities.
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    It's just a shame cause he will eat out if my hand let me stroke him but soon as I pick him up he makes like a squeak noise which makes me feel like bad as if I've hurt him, just wish he would let me pick him up its funny though cause I got him from the adoption centre at pets at home and they said they use to get him out all the time for when they had kids days with activities he use to be a show and tell rabbit x


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    Rabbits are a prey species and by nature do not like being picked up, on an instinctual level being lifted off the ground means imminent death.
    I have three rabbits and while they all enjoy being around me and don't mind/like to be stroked, they all freak out if I try to pick them up.
    Generally baby rabbits in a strange environment are more easily handled because they're scared, but as they get more confident they will struggle. The fact he was handled a lot as a youngster in a loud and rough situation may actually have made him more intolerant of it now.

    I would always advise people to get their rabbit a friend, they are very social animals and benefit immensely from the company of another rabbit. Rabbits are absolutely fine being introduced to others at any age, it just needs to be done properly; Both rabbits must be neutered/spayed and male/female bonds work best. Bonding must be done in a small neutral space and you might need to let them fight it out a little if they need to establish who's boss. If you adopt a spayed female from a rescue you could ask if they may be willing to do the bond for you as it can be a bit daunting.

    Lastly, if he's squeaking when you touch him he may have something physically wrong so I would take him to a vet for a check over. Usually rabbits reserve noise for quite serious situations.
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    (Original post by bdeans)
    It's just a shame cause he will eat out if my hand let me stroke him but soon as I pick him up he makes like a squeak noise which makes me feel like bad as if I've hurt him, just wish he would let me pick him up its funny though cause I got him from the adoption centre at pets at home and they said they use to get him out all the time for when they had kids days with activities he use to be a show and tell rabbit x


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    No wonder he doesn't like to be picked up. This is a very stressful situation for a rabbit to live in.

    My recommendations would be;
    1) Get him neutered ASAP.
    2) Contact a local rabbit rescue to discuss getting him a spayed female companion. They may also handle the bonding for you as they want the new girl to be happy in her new home.

    As for not introducing rabbits who didn't grow up together... that is utter rubbish. I have two pairs of rabbits who were introduced as adults. Mixed sex pairs are very very often SUCCESSFUL as long as both the rabbits are neutered.
 
 
 
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