Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I am a UK citizen. I intend to practise law in the USA, specifically California. My girlfriend is a US Citizen, and we intend to get married and return to the US together. I need to find out if I am better off taking the LLB/GDL courses here in the UK, or rather wait until we return to the USA and do the postgraduate JD degree. Many thanks for your responses in advance.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    To practice in the US, you need the JD and bar certification in your state of choice.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    In the US with rare exception you need to complete an undergraduate degree, then apply to law school (based on UG GPA and LSAT exam --like LNAT) and then do three years of law school. You then pass a bar exam over the summer and are qualified. Each state licenses lawyers seperately so you need to look at the Bar Association or Board of Bar examiners in the state you think you may end up to see if they will recognize an English degree as sufficient to take the bar. Many do, some dont. I fnot you may need to do a one year LLM. California is probably the toughest state in the US in terms of bar exams and admissions.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Can you not study a law course at an American University then go to law school, I mean get your JD in America rather than in England first. Is this possible. If someone is really knowledgeable on this topic can you add me so that I can ask a few more questions, Thanks!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Very few US unis have UG law courses. A few do and some have pre-law. But typically law schools look for a strong performance in any major. Political Science, Econ are popular, but people go onto law school with science or engineering degrees. Same way you don't need law at A level for most law courses in UK
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    It might be better for you to get your undergrad degree in the US, too, but either way you'll need to apply to law school. From what I've heard, they like to see diversity in your studies. One girl I know, for example, is planning to major in history with a minor in biology to apply to law school. I've heard that this option (studying a variety of subjects) is better viewed by law schools than pre-law programs are. That's why I'd suggest going to the US for your undergrad degree, too, since British degrees tend to be very focused, but law schools are looking for someone who is "well-rounded", or proficient in a range of subjects.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Having gone through process very recently keys to admission to law school are:
    Great grades regardles of program; high LSAT (it tests general intellect not subject matter knowledge so key is good reading, analytics); a major or degree in a subject that shows analytical and/or reasoning ability and writing ability; a strong PS that shows both good writing (a real key) and a good rationale for why you want a law degree.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Brussels sprouts
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.