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    I have offers for these two courses and trying to choose between them!

    BA English literature and History of Art at Birmingham uni

    Or

    BA History of Art single honours at Nottingham uni.



    Thanks


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    Since they're different courses, which do you like best? Do you enjoy English lit or not?
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    History of Art? Oh dear.

    Just give up now tbh.
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    (Original post by RtGOAT)
    History of Art? Oh dear.
    Exactly what I was thinking. OP is doomed.

    OP keep looking..
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    Nottingham for sure since it is a much better place for education with friendly and supportive environment. ^_^


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    (Original post by RtGOAT)
    History of Art? Oh dear.

    Just give up now tbh.
    Wow, what a narrow minded view you have! History of art is a valuable subject like any other.

    Let me guess, you're a wannabe science student??
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    (Original post by Juno)
    Since they're different courses, which do you like best? Do you enjoy English lit or not?
    Yes I like English. However, with the art history single honours degree you can also study modules in English and drama. So I would have a little bit of it at Nottingham too.
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    [QUOTE=arty;42315442]Yes I like English. However, with the art history single honours degree you can also study modules in English and drama. So I would have a little bit of it at Nottingham too.

    I think I (slightly) prefer the course at Birmingham, but prefer Nottingham uni! Don't know what to do.
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    (Original post by Prospective UK)
    Nottingham for sure since it is a much better place for education with friendly and supportive environment. ^_^
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    This sounds like you lifted it out of a Nottingham prospectus.

    "Come to Nottingham for a vibrant, international atmosphere, fun for all the family!"
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    (Original post by The Polymath)
    This sounds like you lifted it out of a Nottingham prospectus.

    "Come to Nottingham for a vibrant, international atmosphere, fun for all the family!"
    O_o I swear university is all about independence rather than ''fun for all the family'' that sounds like a cheesy holiday advert
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    (Original post by arty)
    Wow, what a narrow minded view you have! History of art is a valuable subject like any other.

    Let me guess, you're a wannabe science student??
    I think his point is that you're going to have a real hard time getting a job out of that degree.

    Of course many people just worry about that when they graduate but believe me those years fly by and suddenly you're in a position where you need to find a job. I suggest you do your future self a favour and pick something with better employment opportunities.

    The jobs market is tough enough as it is. You need to make every effort to ensure that your employment prospects are high by picking a degree that’s suited to jobs currently in demand.

    You need to find the right blend between picking a degree that you're interested in and picking a degree that provides you with decent employment opportunities. It's not just about what you're interested in and it's not just about employment prospects. You need to have some sort of interest in order to stay engaged in your studies but you need a decent level of employment prospects so that all those years at uni don’t turn into a complete waste of time and money.
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    (Original post by rjm101)
    I think his point is that you're going to have a real hard time getting a job out of that degree.

    Of course many people just worry about that when they graduate but believe me those years fly by and suddenly you're in a position where you need to find a job. I suggest you do your future self a favour and pick something with better employment opportunities.

    The jobs market is tough enough as it is. You need to make every effort to ensure that your employment prospects are high by picking a degree that’s suited to jobs currently in demand.

    You need to find the right blend between picking a degree that you're interested in and picking a degree that provides you with decent employment opportunities. It's not just about what you're interested in and it's not just about employment prospects. You need to have some sort of interest in order to stay engaged in your studies but you need a decent level of employment prospects so that all those years at uni don’t turn into a complete waste of time and money.
    I don't think a History of Art degree is a complete waste of money at all. At the end of the day it's a non vocational arts based subject like Lit. It's really broad and incorporates philosophy, history, psychology, anthropology, politics, religión etc.

    From what I have seen, employment levels aren't bad. Either people go for jobs in the art/museum industries. Other common jobs are journalism&media, finance and conversion to law.

    The employment figures for art history at Nottingham are very impressive on uni stats - compared to a lot of courses I looked at.
    http://unistats.direct.gov.uk/subjec.../10007154-V350

    It is just as valuable as any other art degree. As a previous art student, I can't wait to study it.
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    (Original post by rjm101)
    I think his point is that you're going to have a real hard time getting a job out of that degree.
    No more so than for any other subject. Most graduate schemes don't care what the degree subject is; they are more interested in whether it's a 2:1 or a 1st. If you are doing a subject that doesn't interest you, you'll find it hard to achieve that result. Employers otherwise are also rarely interested in the degree subject and much more interested in transferable skills and competencies - which this degree can teach you as well as any other, if not better than some.

    (Original post by arty)
    I don't think a History of Art degree is a complete waste of money at all. At the end of the day it's a non vocational arts based subject like Lit. It's really broad and incorporates philosophy, history, psychology, anthropology, politics, religión etc.
    Exactly

    From what I have seen, employment levels aren't bad. Either people go for jobs in the art/museum industries. Other common jobs are journalism&media, finance and conversion to law.

    The employment figures for art history at Nottingham are very impressive on uni stats - compared to a lot of courses I looked at.
    http://unistats.direct.gov.uk/subjec.../10007154-V350

    It is just as valuable as any other art degree. As a previous art student, I can't wait to study it.
    So go for the course that appeals to you most; your employments prospects once you graduate are whatever you choose to make of them!
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    (Original post by arty)
    I don't think a History of Art degree is a complete waste of money at all. At the end of the day it's a non vocational arts based subject like Lit. It's really broad and incorporates philosophy, history, psychology, anthropology, politics, religión etc.

    From what I have seen, employment levels aren't bad. Either people go for jobs in the art/museum industries. Other common jobs are journalism&media, finance and conversion to law.

    The employment figures for art history at Nottingham are very impressive on uni stats - compared to a lot of courses I looked at.
    http://unistats.direct.gov.uk/subjec.../10007154-V350

    It is just as valuable as any other art degree. As a previous art student, I can't wait to study it.
    The job stat list looks largely unrelated to me. My suggestion is to work out what career you want to go for and apply for a degree a lot more specific to that occupation. I'm sure you'd benefit in terms of salary too. Doing a degree that has broad appeal sounds good but really it isn’t because it means the employer needs to train you more. If I were an employer, I would pick the graduate with the most relevant degree and no experience versus a graduate with a general degree with no real specifics relating to the job and no experience.

    My suggestion is to spend some time now and put yourself in a position as if you just graduated and need to look for a relevant job in a location your willing to travel to. Can you find anything you would realistically apply for? How many applicants have applied to that one position? How is the supply vs demand?

    I'm just trying to help but it seems you've already made your decision so all of this is pointless. Get back to me when you graduate and get a job.
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    (Original post by rjm101)
    The job stat list looks largely unrelated to me. My suggestion is to work out what career you want to go for and apply for a degree a lot more specific to that occupation. I'm sure you'd benefit in terms of salary too. Doing a degree that has broad appeal sounds good but really it isn’t because it means the employer needs to train you more. If I were an employer, I would pick the graduate with the most relevant degree and no experience versus a graduate with a general degree with no real specifics relating to the job and no experience.

    My suggestion is to spend some time now and put yourself in a position as if you just graduated and need to look for a relevant job in a location your willing to travel to. Can you find anything you would realistically apply for? How many applicants have applied to that one position? How is the supply vs demand?

    I'm just trying to help but it seems you've already made your decision so all of this is pointless. Get back to me when you graduate and get a job.
    I'm sorry, but this is nonsense - well meant, but nonsense.

    What a degree demonstrates is that you have the intellectual capacity to absorb, process, and use information in a meaningful way at a high level. It doesn't matter what the subject is. Employers expect to train people - that's why many of them run graduate schemes, for which a specific degree subject is rarely necessary. What they are looking for is skills and competencies such as leadership, team working, communication, and time management. All of these things can be developed while you are studying for a degree in anything you like.

    Working lives already last over 40 years, and may turn out to be longer still for many of you. Whatever you begin with when you graduate is unlikely to be what you will be doing when you are approaching retirement. What people will need to be is adaptable, ready to take opportunities when they arise, and versatile. The subject of the degree will matter very little even for most people's first job, and will be increasingly less important as time passes and that CV starts to build up. There is every reason for people to study subjects at university for their own sake - you will do better - rather than try and play a dodgy game of 'spot the graduate job' as the basis for your choice.
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    (Original post by Minerva)
    I'm sorry, but this is nonsense - well meant, but nonsense.

    What a degree demonstrates is that you have the intellectual capacity to absorb, process, and use information in a meaningful way at a high level. It doesn't matter what the subject is. Employers expect to train people - that's why many of them run graduate schemes, for which a specific degree subject is rarely necessary. What they are looking for is skills and competencies such as leadership, team working, communication, and time management. All of these things can be developed while you are studying for a degree in anything you like.

    Working lives already last over 40 years, and may turn out to be longer still for many of you. Whatever you begin with when you graduate is unlikely to be what you will be doing when you are approaching retirement. What people will need to be is adaptable, ready to take opportunities when they arise, and versatile. The subject of the degree will matter very little even for most people's first job, and will be increasingly less important as time passes and that CV starts to build up. There is every reason for people to study subjects at university for their own sake - you will do better - rather than try and play a dodgy game of 'spot the graduate job' as the basis for your choice.
    I don’t see your logic behind any of this. Sure you can probably get by on a general level but if you target your degree towards the job you actually want to do then how is this going to negatively impact you in any way? Employers want relevant degrees. To simply say they don't care what you study is ridiculous. Would an employer hire an english lit graduate for a computer science role? Hell no it doesnt make sense. The more relevance the better and as already mentioned of course there would be some sort of training but the extent of that training will likely depend on your current skills most of which you gain at university and this level of relevance will likely determine the graduate salary you end up getting.

    No one cares about what you end up doing 40 years down the line. Of course it's likely to be something different to your first graduate job because that's apart of career progression. Later on in your career you discover what you are good at and enjoy versus what you want to move away from which both impact the future roles we do. By that time most degrees become totally irrelevant. Degrees are mostly about setting you up for a graduate job and being well equipped enough to carry out basic level tasks.

    You are telling OP to study what they want without paying any attention to the employment opportunities available. Like I said, you need to strike a balance between employment opportunities and your interest for the subject otherwise you could end up failing to find any graduate job and end up doing something totally irrelevant to your degree which means all your efforts at uni essentially become wasted.
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    (Original post by rjm101)
    I don’t see your logic behind any of this. Sure you can probably get by on a general level but if you target your degree towards the job you actually want to do then how is this going to negatively impact you in any way? Employers want relevant degrees.
    By and large, employers want the skills and competencies I mentioned above. I know this, because I am one.

    To simply say they don't care what you study is ridiculous. Would an employer hire an english lit graduate for a computer science role? Hell no it doesnt make sense. The more relevance the better and as already mentioned of course there would be some sort of training but the extent of that training will likely depend on your current skills most of which you gain at university and this level of relevance will likely determine the graduate salary you end up getting.
    If an employer requires specific technical skills - eg engineering or computer science, then of course they won't take an English Literature graduate instead - but someone who wants to study English at uni is hardly likely to have the aptitude or interest, let alone the qualifications, to get in for an engineering or computer science degree in the first place. If specific technical skills are not required - which they aren't, for most graduate jobs out there - then the subject of your degree doesn't matter. Suppose you pick something on the basis that you think that's the field you want to work in three years hence - and then find that it absolutely isn't what you want to do? Happens more than you might suppose. Even doctors drop out sometimes (used to be rare, but it's less so now).

    No one cares about what you end up doing 40 years down the line. Of course it's likely to be something different to your first graduate job because that's apart of career progression. Later on in your career you discover what you are good at and enjoy versus what you want to move away from which both impact the future roles we do. By that time most degrees become totally irrelevant. Degrees are mostly about setting you up for a graduate job and being well equipped enough to carry out basic level tasks.
    That's what I said, I think? Where we differ is that you assume that graduate jobs are only on offer to people with specific degrees - this is not the case.

    You are telling OP to study what they want without paying any attention to the employment opportunities available. Like I said, you need to strike a balance between employment opportunities and your interest for the subject otherwise you could end up failing to find any graduate job and end up doing something totally irrelevant to your degree which means all your efforts at uni essentially become wasted.
    Yes, I am, because I have a pretty good knowledge of what makes someone employable.

    Studying a subject in depth for its own sake has its own value, regardless of the job you might get afterwards. Your posts suggest that you are of the persuasion that only 'useful' subjects should be offered at university - which in those terms excludes pretty much everything except the vocational and the scientific/technical. I take a different view, and can cite any numbers of examples of people with 'off-topic' degrees who happen to have done rather well in whichever sector/field they landed up in.

    Good graduates who have developed the skills and competencies I mentioned above will get jobs. It may take some time, depending on where they are in the country, and it may not be their first choice of field or pay. But, no experience, even shelf-stacking, is ever wasted and good, committed people will in time progress as fast and as far as they want to.
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    (Original post by rjm101)
    I don’t see your logic behind any of this. Sure you can probably get by on a general level but if you target your degree towards the job you actually want to do then how is this going to negatively impact you in any way? Employers want relevant degrees. To simply say they don't care what you study is ridiculous. Would an employer hire an english lit graduate for a computer science role? Hell no it doesnt make sense. The more relevance the better and as already mentioned of course there would be some sort of training but the extent of that training will likely depend on your current skills most of which you gain at university and this level of relevance will likely determine the graduate salary you end up getting.

    No one cares about what you end up doing 40 years down the line. Of course it's likely to be something different to your first graduate job because that's apart of career progression. Later on in your career you discover what you are good at and enjoy versus what you want to move away from which both impact the future roles we do. By that time most degrees become totally irrelevant. Degrees are mostly about setting you up for a graduate job and being well equipped enough to carry out basic level tasks.

    You are telling OP to study what they want without paying any attention to the employment opportunities available. Like I said, you need to strike a balance between employment opportunities and your interest for the subject otherwise you could end up failing to find any graduate job and end up doing something totally irrelevant to your degree which means all your efforts at uni essentially become wasted.
    The point is I have no idea what I want to do after university. So I just want to study something I'll enjoy for 3 years. Hopefully I'll be able to apply all the useful skills I've learnt to the career I want to pursue.

    The choice was Birmingham and Nottingham (I could not decide between them and I couldn't think of what else I could do to differentiate them further than maybe peoples opinion on employability). Anyway I've now narrowed out Nottingham - as you're right I don't want to do straight honours history of art (if was not my first choice but offered as an alternative to the joint honours I applied for). So I think I'm going to choose Birmingham or another option is to apply to Bristol for a course through extra. However, I know this is rather a risky move. I kind of wish I had applied to it originally.
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    Two things to think about :

    1. The vast majority of mainstream employers dont have a clue what the Russell Group actually is. A good degree (2.1 or above) from either University will be as good as the other.

    2. A specialist degree (ie. History of Art) can be very limiting in terms of potential employment. Doing a joint subject gives you more options.
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    (Original post by The Polymath)
    This sounds like you lifted it out of a Nottingham prospectus.

    "Come to Nottingham for a vibrant, international atmosphere, fun for all the family!"
    Well it actually comes from my true experience that Nottingham (including York and Lancaster as well) fully understand my situation of being a mature and international student without formal qualification while Birmingham totally disregarded me even before I could apply for their courses.


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