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    'A simple salt bridge can be made out of a strip of filter paper soaked in an aqueous solution of an ionic compound that does not react with either of the half cell solutions. Usually aqueous KNO3(aq) or NH4NO3(aq) is used'. But what's the purpose of soaking the filter paper in an ionic compound solution? Why can't it just be soaked in plain water?
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    (Original post by tazmaniac97)
    'A simple salt bridge can be made out of a strip of filter paper soaked in an aqueous solution of an ionic compound that does not react with either of the half cell solutions. Usually aqueous KNO3(aq) or NH4NO3(aq) is used'. But what's the purpose of soaking the filter paper in an ionic compound solution? Why can't it just be soaked in plain water?
    I believe that the ions aid conduction of electricity...

    EDIT: I could be wrong, I'm not too sure. But I think it is correct...
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    (Original post by Booyah)
    I believe that the ions aid conduction of electricity...

    EDIT: I could be wrong, I'm not too sure. But I think it is correct...
    You are right man
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    (Original post by Booyah)
    I believe that the ions aid conduction of electricity...

    EDIT: I could be wrong, I'm not too sure. But I think it is correct...
    Oh I see, so the water allows transfer of ions, but the ions allow transfer of electricity.
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    (Original post by tazmaniac97)
    Oh I see, so the water allows transfer of ions, but the ions allow transfer of electricity.
    The ions flow both ways in the salt bridge to prevent charge building up in the two half cells which would prevent current flow.

    Once even one electron is lost from an oxidation at the electrode the solution would then be positive.

    This is prevented by the motion of a negative ion from the salt bridge ions in the direction of that half cell.

    Simultaneously a positive ion goes the other way to compensate for a reduction at the other electrode ...

    ... and so on ...
 
 
 
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