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Did Lenin strive for the "Greater Good" or was he just incredibly power hungry? watch

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    I know none of you knew him but I was curious about the general opinion on this talented and interesting chap: Was Vladimir Lenin a good guy in his heart of hearts? After all, his political ideology would benefit everybody once communism was achieved worldwide, right? (No, I'm not fundamentally asking "Communism or Capitalism?"
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    No he was a very evil man and just as bad as Stalin. He mercilessly massacred the Kronstadt sailors, who had originally supported him, just because they asked for elections and enough food to eat. He implemented policies of grain requisitioning during the Civil War to steal food off starving peasants. He invaded Poland without provocation, attempting to crush the Polish people's new found liberty which they had won after centuries of occupation.
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    (Original post by NadezhdaK)
    I know none of you knew him but I was curious about the general opinion on this talented and interesting chap: Was Vladimir Lenin a good guy in his heart of hearts? After all, his political ideology would benefit everybody once communism was achieved worldwide, right? (No, I'm not fundamentally asking "Communism or Capitalism?"
    I don't believe for one moment he had a "good heart" nor did he strive towards a greater good. He was very much stuck, and happy to remain, in the transactional stage between Communism and Capitalism - the dictatorship of the Proletariat. Both Lenin and Stalin were paranoid about losing power and ruthlessly suppressed opposition which was, in most cases imagined. They both manipulated and used Marx as a guise to gain power - their adoption of Marx was lukewarm at best and they both were obsessed with maintaining power.

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    Simple answer would be he was power hungry, it's amazing how history remembers some people


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    I would say that he was much more ideological than Stalin, and really believed in Communism. After all, for most of his life, a Communist Russia looked impossible, as the Tsarist government cracked down on opponents. However, after he had acquired power, he became hungry for power and was responsible for the deaths of thousands.
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    (Original post by navarre)
    I would say that he was much more ideological than Stalin, and really believed in Communism. After all, for most of his life, a Communist Russia looked impossible, as the Tsarist government cracked down on opponents. However, after he had acquired power, he became hungry for power and was responsible for the deaths of thousands.

    He believed in communism but he succumbed to it's main failure: A lack of account for human nature ( human greed ).
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    Lenin and his friend Trotsky were traitors. They used the revolutionary movements in 1917 to institute a tyranny over Russia, so they could try to drive the peasant population to industrialisation. Very different to anything Karl Marx had in mind
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    He was power mad.

    One of the reasons the Bolsheviks went ahead with the revolution was that if they had waited for the other Soviet groups to join them, the Bolsheviks would have had to share power with them. There was a vote after the revolution which went against the Bolsheviks and Lenin ignored it. Apparently the people didn't realise what was good for them.
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    (Original post by Izzyeviel)
    He was power mad.

    One of the reasons the Bolsheviks went ahead with the revolution was that if they had waited for the other Soviet groups to join them, the Bolsheviks would have had to share power with them. There was a vote after the revolution which went against the Bolsheviks and Lenin ignored it. Apparently the people didn't realise what was good for them.
    I guess we'll never know why exactly Lenin dissolved the constituent assembly after the vote. Maybe it was he wanted things done a certain way (as he would say) or that he didn't want to compromise power for the sake of having power. I don't know. I just don't like the Cheka. Though he did seem to regret it all upon his death...
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    He was the architect of Russia's century-long misery it still struggles to escape. The Red Terror, the prodrazverstka, the absolutely merciless campaigns against the monarchists and the clergy. Just like Stalin he was floating around in a hellish ocean of blood.
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    His failure to arrive at true communism is evident from his move to the 'New Economic Policy' after 'War Communism' which is also shown by Trotsky's comments on his economic shift.
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    (Original post by getoom)
    His failure to arrive at true communism is evident from his move to the 'New Economic Policy' after 'War Communism' which is also shown by Trotsky's comments on his economic shift.
    That's what the Capitalists would have you believe.

    Lenin's shift from Communism started in the days/months after the October Revolution.
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    (Original post by Izzyeviel)
    That's what the Capitalists would have you believe.

    Lenin's shift from Communism started in the days/months after the October Revolution.
    With the dissolving of the constituent assembly?
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    (Original post by Izzyeviel)
    That's what the Capitalists would have you believe.

    Lenin's shift from Communism started in the days/months after the October Revolution.

    I'd agree in that he started his shift however it only gained momentum during NEP, war communism was communism.
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    (Original post by getoom)
    With the dissolving of the constituent assembly?

    He was still a communist just not a pure communist.

    For example, Sweden has a free market economy however it is not pure free market.
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    (Original post by Izzyeviel)
    That's what the Capitalists would have you believe.

    Lenin's shift from Communism started in the days/months after the October Revolution.
    Lenin shifted from Communism upon the split of the Bolsheviks and Mensheviks in 1903. He called for democratic centrism, a tight knit party clique, a forced revolution and he refused to adopt economism in the hope that it would push the workers so far into a corner they would turn to revolution. He had absolutely no intention of following a doctrinaire course from this stage onwards.

    As you correctly said, the October Revolution was not a genuine communist revolution it was a coup d'etat. In all honesty the February Revolution was more spontaneous and pushed by the workers.

    Lenin used the guise of Marx to gain power and never intended to have a genuine communist state.
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    (Original post by Thriftworks)
    He was still a communist just not a pure communist.

    For example, Sweden has a free market economy however it is not pure free market.
    You're either a communist or not. There isn't an in between -- that's sort the point.
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    (Original post by NadezhdaK)
    You're either a communist or not. There isn't an in between -- that's sort the point.
    There is a gap in between You don't have to follow the exact line of marx to be closer to communism than any other idealogy.

    By that logic the cpc were not communists
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    (Original post by Thriftworks)
    There is a gap in between You don't have to follow the exact line of marx to be closer to communism than any other idealogy.

    By that logic the cpc were not communists
    Marx didn't invent communism -- he just made a theory about how it would develop., and by doing so brought it to the attention of modern people. So no, you don't have to follow the exact line of Marx, but you do need an absence of money, equality and a state run completely by the people with no government, which the Bolsheviks didn't have. Though they may have been moving towards this before Stalin, who definitely did not intend no government. A dictatorship is very much an anti-communist system. It's just that the one-party system, which actually means no government at all and the people all working together, is often (deliberately) interpreted this way.
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    (Original post by NadezhdaK)
    Marx didn't invent communism -- he just made a theory about how it would develop., and by doing so brought it to the attention of modern people. So no, you don't have to follow the exact line of Marx, but you do need an absence of money, equality and a state run completely by the people with no government, which the Bolsheviks didn't have. Though they may have been moving towards this before Stalin, who definitely did not intend no government. A dictatorship is very much an anti-communist system. It's just that the one-party system, which actually means no government at all and the people all working together, is often (deliberately) interpreted this way.

    Well that simply wouldn't work, thus you get dictatorships. People are always going to seek power there are no angels who can administrate on behalf of the people whilst not trying to better themselves and thus make society un-equal.

    I mean non of us are greedy are we?
 
 
 
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