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    (Original post by Trousers)

    Perhaps one of the class should have a quiet word with her.
    We could as the class is on very good terms with her, we can discuss almost anything.

    The thing is, it would be unprofessional of us to tell her how to carry out her job and thing may result in us simply being transferred to another teacher and she may take on another class which is not what we would want to happen.
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    (Original post by Mad Caddie)
    We could as the class is on very good terms with her, we can discuss almost anything.

    The thing is, it would be unprofessional of us to tell her how to carry out her job and thing may result in us simply being transferred to another teacher and she may take on another class which is not what we would want to happen.
    You could put it in such a way that it doesn't seem like you're telling her off. You shouldn't tell her how to do her job, but you can tell her what it's like from your point of view.

    Let her know that you're worried about your exams, and she will understand. Make sure she knows how much you appreciate her normally, and that you don't want to lose her.

    Don't tell her she should go on maternity leave! Even if that's what you're thinking, it will only insult her. In fact, try not to mention the pregnancy at all. Just say you've had a few lessons recently where you don't think you've learned anything. Leave the rest up to her.
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    (Original post by Mad Caddie)
    Thats the thing, and then it get worse when a replacement teacher arrives. Given that there is a national shortage of teachers as it is, firstly we're stuck with supply teachers for a few weeks and then when sombody is found it often takes a number of weeks for them to actually get some good quality teaching started. By which time its too late.
    For my A-Level chem course we had no fewer than 18 teachers in 2 years.... Thank the lord your's is only up the duff!!!!
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    Its crazy to suggest that pregnant teachers should take extra long maternity leave any more than pregnant women in any other responsible job! Sure maybe some pregnant teachers are going to fall a bit below their usual standard, but that is not as serious as a pregnant surgeon dropping in standard, or a pregnant barrister - someone could be sent down for life as a result of that!
    Most women would probably be quite willing to take longer maternity leave if they could afford to, but I dont think many people would vote for a government that wanted to provide paid maternity leave for the entire pregnancy!
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    Oh for crying out loud, pregnancy is not a disability! It does not affect the way you teach. If this teacher is having problems teaching then it's an individual basis. Pregnancy does not affect your memory or make you scatter brained unless of course you are stressed out thinking about how you are going to care for your new addition to the family. There is no reason that a women should go on maternity leave as soon as she becomes pregnant, unless there are complications with the pregnancy. It is quite normal to work close to time of delivery. Most employers do not offer extended leave unless it is ordered by a doctor and then you go for an extended period of time with no pay as in most cases the leave is unpaid and after there is the chance of loosing ones job due to not being able to return on the specified date. Besides I don't think you will find many employers willing to pay for employees being off on leave for 9 mos or more. :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Infinity)
    Oh for crying out loud, pregnancy is not a disability! It does not affect the way you teach. If this teacher is having problems teaching then it's an individual basis. Pregnancy does not affect your memory or make you scatter brained unless of course you are stressed out thinking about how you are going to care for your new addition to the family. There is no reason that a women should go on maternity leave as soon as she becomes pregnant, unless there are complications with the pregnancy. It is quite normal to work close to time of delivery. Most employers do not offer extended leave unless it is ordered by a doctor and then you go for an extended period of time with no pay as in most cases the leave is unpaid and after there is the chance of loosing ones job due to not being able to return on the specified date. Besides I don't think you will find many employers willing to pay for employees being off on leave for 9 mos or more. :rolleyes:
    What about if she had twins? Surely double the probems? Oh wait, your saying arguing that there are no problems, sorry wasn't paying enough attention, I must be pregnant.

    I agree to some extent with you. However surely if an expectant mother is carrying, then there must be some strain on the body, even though it is designed for what it does best, yo can't say that the miliions of processes and chemicals moving about don't affect ones performance. Fatigue, toilet breaks, morning sickness, adrenalin, etc?

    (Original post by Infinity)
    Oh for crying out loud, pregnancy is not a disability! It does not affect the way you teach.
    Are you trying to say that teachers with disabilities are less good at teaching?

    Rosie
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    (Original post by crana)
    Are you trying to say that teachers with disabilities are less good at teaching?

    Rosie
    It would depend what disability.
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    (Original post by crana)
    Are you trying to say that teachers with disabilities are less good at teaching?

    Rosie
    She doesn't mean it in an offensive way. People need to be less aggressive.
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    (Original post by Joey_Johns)
    It would depend what disability.
    Or simply whether they had half a brain cell to actually teach.
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    (Original post by crana)
    Are you trying to say that teachers with disabilities are less good at teaching?

    Rosie
    Depends on the disability.
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    (Original post by Bhaal85)
    She doesn't mean it in an offensive way. People need to be less aggressive.
    People are looking for arguments.
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    (Original post by Bhaal85)
    She doesn't mean it in an offensive way. People need to be less aggressive.
    Thank you Bhaal. No I didn't mean it that way, if you'll notice they are 2 seperate sentences. I was mainly objecting to the statement that pregnant teachers should be on leave for the duration of the pregnancy. I think my use of the word dissability has been misunderstood, I meant as in a temporary disability that would prevent the person from doing their job, which is not the case with a normal pregnancy. Simply stated it is not a disability.
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    would it be a different issue if you got the teacher pregnant?
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    (Original post by Bhaal85)
    What about if she had twins? Surely double the probems? Oh wait, your saying arguing that there are no problems, sorry wasn't paying enough attention, I must be pregnant.

    I agree to some extent with you. However surely if an expectant mother is carrying, then there must be some strain on the body, even though it is designed for what it does best, yo can't say that the miliions of processes and chemicals moving about don't affect ones performance. Fatigue, toilet breaks, morning sickness, adrenalin, etc?
    Ready for abit of a shock?
    I can say that in a normal pregnancy you can carry on with normal activities, even some that are strenuous. Yes there is some fatigue but that can be easily remedied by taking naps after work and getting extra sleep at night. Toilet breaks don't get bad until closer to the end when the baby has dropped and is pressing on the bladder constantly. Morning sickness, well never had it, but I hear saltines are good for that. Hell I helped my mom lay out new flooring in the kitchen when I was 5 mos preggy, and was doing lots of minor remodeling up until 8 mos, at that point my tummy was getting in the way, and if I laid something down by my feet I couldn't see where i put it.
    Never affected my train of thought, never made me scatter brained, that came after she was born and I stopped sleeping at night.
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    (Original post by Infinity)
    Ready for abit of a shock?

    <Is indeed surprised>
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    <is still surprised and now wondering why noone else is admitting it>
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    I think your comments are a little unreasonable, being 3 months pregnent will have no effect on her teaching ability and seeing as most people spend 40+ years employed after is not a possiblity and before would mean they were having children in thier mid 20s. i doubt most people have met thier life partner by then and are in no place to have children.
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    (Original post by Infinity)
    Ready for abit of a shock?
    I can say that in a normal pregnancy you can carry on with normal activities, even some that are strenuous. Yes there is some fatigue but that can be easily remedied by taking naps after work and getting extra sleep at night. Toilet breaks don't get bad until closer to the end when the baby has dropped and is pressing on the bladder constantly. Morning sickness, well never had it, but I hear saltines are good for that. Hell I helped my mom lay out new flooring in the kitchen when I was 5 mos preggy, and was doing lots of minor remodeling up until 8 mos, at that point my tummy was getting in the way, and if I laid something down by my feet I couldn't see where i put it.
    Never affected my train of thought, never made me scatter brained, that came after she was born and I stopped sleeping at night.
    #.......shock, shock, horror, horror.......#

    Mortified and mystified at the same time.
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    (Original post by blissy)
    <is still surprised and now wondering why noone else is admitting it>
    Everyone is just sitting there with their jaws on the ground.
    (Bhaal for example)


    Ok just for the record, I was ingaged to be married, and the wedding was in the planning stages before I became pregnant.
 
 
 
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