Can I move to a US high school from the UK?

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Americandream
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I want to move to a US high school and I want to know if there are only certain schools who will except students from the UK. I want to go to uni in America and I think going to high school there will give me the best chance, plus the education system in the UK is awful and my school is 2nd in the county as well. I'm 15 and I have also been looking at staying with a host family if I went there. I just need extra advice.


Thank you!
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Too Many Commas
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What about the education system in the UK is it that you find so awful? And how do you think it could be better in the US?


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thecrimsonidol
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Unless you're a troll, it just sounds like you have issues with education rather than where you are.
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CEKTOP
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(Original post by Americandream)
I want to move to a US high school and I want to know if there are only certain schools who will except students from the UK. I want to go to uni in America and I think going to high school there will give me the best chance, plus the education system in the UK is awful and my school is 2nd in the county as well. I'm 15 and I have also been looking at staying with a host family if I went there. I just need extra advice.


Thank you!
If you're not a troll then I'd say that you have much better chances of getting into a good American university with your A-levels rather than SAT/ACT.
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jelly1000
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(Original post by CEKTOP)
If you're not a troll then I'd say that you have much better chances of getting into a good American university with your A-levels rather than SAT/ACT.
Most American universities require SAT tests to be taken by all applicants
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F1's Finest
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The troll factor is so strong in this one.

There's nothing wrong with the UK system to be honest.
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Faberry
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(Original post by James A)
The troll factor is so strong in this one.

There's nothing wrong with the UK system to be honest.
Aside from the severe shortage and overpopulation in schools, normative and too-vague marking schemes for papers, constant shake-ups of the GCSE courses, shifting of grade boundaries at the last minute...

Of course there's no problem in the system.
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F1's Finest
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(Original post by Faberry)
Aside from the severe shortage and overpopulation in schools, normative and too-vague marking schemes for papers, constant shake-ups of the GCSE courses, shifting of grade boundaries at the last minute...

Of course there's no problem in the system.
It's still a good system and if you compare it to many other countries worldwide.

I think it's more a case of taking for granted life in the UK.
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Faberry
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(Original post by James A)
It's still a good system and if you compare it to many other countries worldwide.

I think it's more a case of taking for granted life in the UK.
Compared to developing countries, yes. But in the developed world, it's atrocious. That shouldn't be.
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LStudent
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(Original post by Too Many Commas)
What about the education system in the UK is it that you find so awful? And how do you think it could be better in the US?


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This. I'd like to hear your reasons as well. Keep in mind that all educational systems have their flaws. Perhaps doing up a list of the pros and cons will help. Now to the actual question. If you are in secondary school then you shouldn't have too much difficulty transferring. You might have to take a few tests so they can be sure to place you properly. Contact the US Department of Education and see what they have to say.
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British-Student
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Are you sure it's not just wanderlust? The desire to move away can be overwhelming, I know, but reality is a little harsher. At 15, you aren't old enough to be moving anywhere on your own, and I'm not sure your guardians would be keen on moving away on a whim. Give it a couple of years; maybe when you're applying to university you can look overseas, or even do your degree in the UK but choose a programme with an industrial placement in the States. This way you will forge links there and possibly set the foundation for further study or future employment there.
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Exopaladin
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Considering that it's common for people to still say that our education system is better than the US and that people work on rather more advanced material, it doesn't entirely seem worthwhile to spend money to live there/go to highschool. There are plenty of high schools there that suck and suffer overcrowding, it's not the utopia you think. Google for poor education system America and you'll find plenty of articles underlining how bad it is there.

Additionally, doing A-levels here likely means being able to skip the first year of uni due to our content is a couple of years ahead and more in-depth. Considering that American unis are hideously expensive compared to ours even with our new tuition fees, that's a good thing.
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epatrick17
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Haha want to trade? I'm 15 too and want to do a year abroad in the UK. I think if you are really serious about college in the US then living there will probably give you an advantage. At my school (I go to a private school, I think it's called an independent school in the uk?) students start college planning in their junior year when they are around 16-17. The application process will definitely be easier if you live here. We take the PSAT (practice sat) every year to help prepare for the SAT and there are separate counselors that assist you in the process. The US education system is also a lot different from the UK. At my school you take 6 subjects. 4-5 of which are usually mandatory and then 1-2 are electives. You have to take classes like Chemistry, Physics, Calculus, and English... Even if you are not interested in pursuing them. Some schools offer AP classes which can earn you college credit and have a much heavier and harder workload. You can also go to college without knowing what you want to do or study.

I would be really careful in selecting a school. In my area the public schools are incredibly bad and offer almost no support to students. Even if living here does give you an advantage, a bad education for your last 2 years of high school isn't going to do you any good either. If you can pay for a catholic or private school, I definitely would.

PS, the girls will love your accent!
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