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wardah2
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I'm going to university in September and hopefully going to come out with a Sociology degree. I've been looking at becoming a teacher for a while and I've always wanted to live in America and maybe become a teacher there. Just wondering whether anyone knows how I can actually make this possible and what I need to do in order to be able to become a teacher in america?
Please and thank you
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Shelly_x
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(Original post by wardah2)
I'm going to university in September and hopefully going to come out with a Sociology degree. I've been looking at becoming a teacher for a while and I've always wanted to live in America and maybe become a teacher there. Just wondering whether anyone knows how I can actually make this possible and what I need to do in order to be able to become a teacher in america?
Please and thank you
Each state has different rules on what qualifications it wants its teachers to have. Some of them are more inclined to accept teachers from another country than others. Look on the education websites for states that you would like to work in. It is hard to get a visa for America. So I would take this into consideration.
Also, if you want to train to teach in America, your qualification may not transfer back to the UK. And it will be very expensive most likely.
There are several threads on this topic on the TES website that may be of use to you

You could also try things such as Camp America if you just wanted to experience America for a while.
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rachelsays
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(Original post by wardah2)
I'm going to university in September and hopefully going to come out with a Sociology degree. I've been looking at becoming a teacher for a while and I've always wanted to live in America and maybe become a teacher there. Just wondering whether anyone knows how I can actually make this possible and what I need to do in order to be able to become a teacher in america?
Please and thank you
Easiest option for a British citizen - get a PGCE after your degree, work as a teacher for a couple of years, then either get a job in a British school in America, an International school in America, or join one of the programmes that arranges for British teachers to go on an exchange to America. They will be able to get a working visa for you as they will be able to stipulate British nationality as a pre-requisite for the job.

Getting a visa to live and work in America as a British citizen independently of these options is practically impossible unless you marry an American. No American state school would sponsor a British citizen to come and work in their school as there are plenty of unemployed American citizens as it is.

I used to live and work in America and know the visa regulations for British citizens like the back of my hand. Trust me, it's a minefield and marriage or sponsorship by a workplace is pretty much the only way. Whatever you do, don't try and enter the country on a tourist visa and then overstay your welcome - my friend did that after our work visas expired and she's now banned from entering the US for 10 years!!
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XxElla93xX
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Hi, I was hoping to do the same thing and had already planned on doing a PGCE. I was hoping to move to California and I have looked into the state laws but it all gets rather confusing! I will be studying an English Literature Degree and I want to become an English Teacher and eventually gain a Phd. If I was to get a PGCE could you explain more about the process of the transfer to attempting to live and work in America? I'm interested in your suggestions of working in a British School? I have my heart set on California, always have done but my boyfriend is completing a Physiotherapy Degree and hoping to move there as well wanting to be a sports therapist in a College for basketball.

Sorry if that is confusing but I'm really looking into this and your information has been better than any I've found so far!
Thanks
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rachelsays
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(Original post by XxElla93xX)
Hi, I was hoping to do the same thing and had already planned on doing a PGCE. I was hoping to move to California and I have looked into the state laws but it all gets rather confusing! I will be studying an English Literature Degree and I want to become an English Teacher and eventually gain a Phd. If I was to get a PGCE could you explain more about the process of the transfer to attempting to live and work in America? I'm interested in your suggestions of working in a British School? I have my heart set on California, always have done but my boyfriend is completing a Physiotherapy Degree and hoping to move there as well wanting to be a sports therapist in a College for basketball.

Sorry if that is confusing but I'm really looking into this and your information has been better than any I've found so far!
Thanks
Hi Ella,

A PGCE plus three year undergraduate degree will qualify you for teaching in all US States, as they require a minimum of 4 years' study.

Once you have your PGCE, it will be a good idea to get your NQT year (first qualifying year out of the way) and probably another year of experience under your belt before you try and go abroad. Most of the exchange programmes will want this experience anyway, and I know the British Schools of America require at least two years' teaching experience. It will also make your life easier if it doesn't work out and you want to come back to the UK sooner than you expected, as you'll still have plenty of relevant UK teaching experience on your CV.

Here are your options.

Exchange:

VIF - this programme is well established and arranges for UK teachers to work in American state schools, largely in the South - North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, Maryland and occasionally Florida. The commitment on your part is for a minimum of two years but if you love it, the experience can last up to five years, at which point I believe (this may have changed) you'd be able to apply for a Green Card, having been in the US for the required number of years to claim permanent residency.
In recent years the programme has suffered due to the recession as many US school boards have been making teachers redundant, and as far as I know, it's certainly not sending as many teachers as it used to. However, this situation could be completely different by the time you're ready to go. Here's the website for you: http://www.vifprogram.com/

Amity Institute - this is a similar programme to VIF but can place you all over the US. I know less about this option and its reliability but it seems perfectly above board.
http://www.amity.org/

Fulbright Scholarship Programme - Fulbright is a decades old programme run by the British Council and the US State Department, swapping UK/US teachers for a year. This is highly competitive and requires several years' teaching experience, plus the willingness of your school to host your swap teacher. This year it didn't run because of financial problems so not sure about its future, but it's a good option if you want to test the waters without a longer term commitment.
http://www.britishcouncil.org/learning-fulbright.htm

British/International schools:

The British Schools of America (otherwise known as World Class Learning schools) are in New York, Charlotte, Boston, Houston, Washington DC and Chicago - none in California as yet but you never know what will happen in the next couple of years as they are expanding quite rapidly. They hire only British teachers but not all of them cater to secondary age. You need two years' teaching experience to apply and they are very hard to get into as obviously they get many applicants for each job!
http://www.wclschools.org/

There are also some International schools in the US that would be able to hire foreign teachers and give them a visa. There is a list here of accredited International schools but not all would be in the visa-giving category - the UN School in New York and the Indianapolis International school are, and potentially the one in Atlanta, but I'm not sure about the rest.
http://portal.cois.org/WCM/CIS/Direc...3-c95f523ba32b

If your boyfriend eventually becomes your husband and he is able to get a job in the US that also allows you to have a work visa, then you don't need to worry as much, because you'd then be able to register with your local state school department and teach in state schools. However, without the right to work in the US as currently stands, you are reliant on a sponsoring organisation, so getting as much teaching experience as you can, preferably International Baccalaureate experience (many schools in the UK now teach this, especially in the private sector) and you should be able to find a way to get out to the States fairly soon after qualifying.

I plan on going back myself once I've got my first couple of years of teaching under my belt - once you've lived in the US, it gets under your skin!

Good luck!
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XxElla93xX
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This information is great!! Thank you so much! X
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gilmore123
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I am currently a UK teacher (in my second year of teaching) and I will be moving to the USA this summer to teach in New York as a full-time school teacher. The process to teach in the US from the UK is relatively straight forward providing you have been teaching in the UK for at least 2 years (this is the US requirement). You first need to find a sponsor; EPI and Participate are two organisations which don't require you to pay any fees, however, they only work with schools in states like NC, SC, VA and FL. In order to work in more desirable states such as NYC, CA DC, you will need to pay a significant fee to a designated sponsor. I went through a sponsor organisation called 'Teachers Council'. Whilst you do have to pay a large fee to have them sponsor you (approximately $3,000), teachers wages in places like NYC, CA and DC are considerably more than less-desirable states; therefore, it all averages out in my opinion. For example, as a 3rd year teacher, I was offered $68,000 per year for a particular school in New York. If you want to work in California, the process is more tricky. Unlike most other states whereby you can work as a teacher in some schools without having a state-specific teaching permit (just your QTS from the UK), in CA, almost all schools require their teachers to have a valid state teaching credential. I applied for this online (approximately £300) and had to submit many documents from the UK. Although I have now secured a job as a teacher in NYC, I have also been granted my teaching credential for California, allowing me to teach in all schools in California if I wanted to. This preliminary teaching credential is for 5-years and so I intend to relocate from NYC to California in a few years time to teach there. If anyone needs anything clarifying about the process, please feel free to reach out to me....
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