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    (Original post by DazYa12)
    the best thing to do is to go down to your local dealer ( preferably a store ) and tell them what you will be needing it for

    price range for a good PC will fall between £500 and £800, you'll be fine
    local places can be overpriced tho,
    do a little research before hand
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    (Original post by Baron)
    i would recommend AMD Athlon Xp, much better value for money and a i reckon better processor

    i wouldnt worry too much unless you wish to do anything which would be require a beefy graphics card (e.g. computer games), if you just want to word process, surf the internet, watch dvds etc then a amazingly powerful graphics card won't be needed

    DVD Writer £40 although i only does +RW and not -RW but:
    Here is a quality optorite dvd writer for £54 with +/- RW, perfect

    TFT's are good, but if you do wish to play computers games then i would advise a CRT. The other dissadvantage you can get with TFTs sometimes are dead pixels
    yeah, athlons are the way to go, purely for price/performance.

    graphics-wise, avoid ALL nvidia cards. Get a nice radeon 9600pro for about £70.

    And unless you have a small desk (and the money), dont buy a tft, because they are slower than CRTs and expensive!

    Ebuyer + making it yourself is really the way to go (or get someone else to build it)
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    When you're looking for a printer avoid Lexmarks - they're usually very cheap to buy but replacing the cartridges costs a bundle.
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    I suggest you build your own
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    (Original post by piginapoke)
    Ideally, don't get an inkjet at all. They are cheap initially, but they are the most expensive printers on a per page basis.
    yeh - dot matrix - much better
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    (Original post by DazYa12)
    the best thing to do is to go down to your local dealer ( preferably a store ) and tell them what you will be needing it for
    One problem there, the sales people in most cases are on comission and therefore will do their best to sell you more than what you really want or need. I went in and was asking about a $600.00 p4 system and within 10 mins the salesguy was trying to talk me into a $1200.00 system, it was sweet but way more than I need but he told me the cheaper one wouldn't run any of my programs. Needless to say I didn't buy either system.
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    (Original post by piginapoke)
    I've got a HP quietjet that's about 12 years old and weighs about as much as me. I don't print out fancy dan graphics, just plain text so its ok for me. I refill the cartridge with a syringe, making it cheap as chips.
    there is a dot matrix at my uni and we dont have to pay for it (unlike the lasers - 4p per page) so i print my code out on it, takes a while but is free
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    (Original post by piginapoke)
    You have to pay for laser printing? What a gyp.
    yeh, there are these machines in various places around the uni , where you type in ure username and pword and you can top-up you printer balance
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    (Original post by piginapoke)
    You'd think the extortionate fees would stretch to cover that. I only have to pay for high quality colour printing, which I never need anyway.
    i probably do more printing in my room, we can access are user space through the uni website

    where are yu doing your masters?
 
 
 
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