Unemployed for 3 years now and no idea how to solve it.

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akmd
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I have been looking for work for about 3 years now. I signed on within a week of finishing my final exam. I have been on the work programme for the past year and have found it pretty useless to be honest. I do have an interview workshop/mock interview day with Seetec (the second provider I have been involved with since going on the WP) on Friday so I'll see how that goes. I do have a problem with navigating my way through interviews but I have only had six in the past 3 years so I'm hoping that this workshop will actually be of use to me.

I have mainly been looking for admin roles but have been struggling to get short listed for even these. I am not sure what to do. I will be 27 in July and I have a 2.2 history degree from Goldsmiths. I have done various voluntary placements in the past 5 years. These have mostly been in archives but my most recent experience was as an intern for a political party where I did a number of administrative tasks (updating databases, maintaining websites, drafting correspondence, preparing meetings/canvass sessions etc).
I really don't know where to turn to so I've come here to ask for advice. Can anyone recommend job sites/agencies or specific roles that I can try? I'd also be keen for recommendations of forums that focus on job seeking and ways of finding a job. I would appreciate any help you folks can give me.
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wanderlust.xx
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I am genuinely surprised. Are you being picky? You have a 2:2 in history, and that means something. You could at least do something like a retail job.

If you come back and reply with some pitiful excuse, then that's your answer. The hardest truth to understand once you graduate is that your degree entitles you to nothing, and neither does your previous experience. What matters is how you perform in whatever role you are given, and whether you demonstrate a strong work ethic. Do that, and you'll be offered a job anywhere.

First step - get any paid job and work yourself up from the bottom of the food chain. Stop trying to jump in half way. Get any job, work hard, then find another.
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Subbi
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Pretty sad, to be honest! But hey, you had enough! It's time to sort things out.
I presume that you are way too desperate to get a job (which is perfectly normal, don't worry!), that's the only way I can explain your problems during the interview. You clearly have to focus on your strategy at the interview, learning how to sell yourself in a natural way ( I'm not talking about boasting here hehe).
'I am not sure what to do.' implies the fact that you have no idea what your ideal future would be and this has a huge impact on your professional life, because you're not motivated enough to fight for your career! Before anything else, my piece of advice is to save some time to yourself, go out and walk for hours, do relaxing activites in order to release from the negative energy you stored. Then, decide your path, mainly what you truly want to become and then you'll see what to look for
Moreover, a good profile on LinkedIn, nice Facebook Profile, decent pics on social networks all these give you a better chance of getting a job!
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akmd
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(Original post by wanderlust.xx)
I am genuinely surprised. Are you being picky? You have a 2:2 in history, and that means something. You could at least do something like a retail job.

If you come back and reply with some pitiful excuse, then that's your answer. The hardest truth to understand once you graduate is that your degree entitles you to nothing, and neither does your previous experience. What matters is how you perform in whatever role you are given, and whether you demonstrate a strong work ethic. Do that, and you'll be offered a job anywhere.

First step - get any paid job and work yourself up from the bottom of the food chain. Stop trying to jump in half way. Get any job, work hard, then find another.
What concerns me about going for retail for example would be that an employer would think that I'm overqualified for the post and would not take my application seriously because they know that I would quit the job at the drop of a hat when something better comes along. I'm struggling to find even entry level office work that doesn't already ask for significant prior experience.

I guess I want a job that plays to my strengths. I would say that I'm well organised, learn new skills quickly, punctual, reliable, able to conduct effective research to find relevant material and an ability to analyse and reach conclusions from information that I have researched. I would dearly love some kind of research role where I could spend my time scouring libraries/archives and gathering information for whichever organisation I'm working with because I know that is something that I could do well and would enjoy. But it seems that any vacancy I find that even vaguely resembles that wants significant experience which I don't have or some kind of postgrad education. This is why I started focusing on admin jobs as a stepping stone and have been increasingly directionless as time goes by. I just can't see a way out.
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member9876
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Yet another history degree with no job
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LexiswasmyNexis
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(Original post by member9876)
Yet another history degree with no job
You could just as easily say "Yet another 2:2 with no job".

There are perhaps 5 history grads at the very most who come here for advice. Compared to the huge number of history grads out there, it isn't very high.


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LexiswasmyNexis
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(Original post by akmd)
What concerns me about going for retail for example would be that an employer would think that I'm overqualified for the post and would not take my application seriously because they know that I would quit the job at the drop of a hat when something better comes along. I'm struggling to find even entry level office work that doesn't already ask for significant prior experience.

I guess I want a job that plays to my strengths. I would say that I'm well organised, learn new skills quickly, punctual, reliable, able to conduct effective research to find relevant material and an ability to analyse and reach conclusions from information that I have researched. I would dearly love some kind of research role where I could spend my time scouring libraries/archives and gathering information for whichever organisation I'm working with because I know that is something that I could do well and would enjoy. But it seems that any vacancy I find that even vaguely resembles that wants significant experience which I don't have or some kind of postgrad education. This is why I started focusing on admin jobs as a stepping stone and have been increasingly directionless as time goes by. I just can't see a way out.
You could get and hold down a retail job... If you haven't tried, you can't be that desperate.


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member9876
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(Original post by LexiswasmyNexis)
You could just as easily say "Yet another 2:2 with no job".

There are perhaps 5 history grads at the very most who come here for advice. Compared to the huge number of history grads out there, it isn't very high.


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I'm honestly not trying for a windup but I honestly don't believe there are very many history grads who have a job
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wanderlust.xx
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(Original post by akmd)
What concerns me about going for retail for example would be that an employer would think that I'm overqualified for the post and would not take my application seriously because they know that I would quit the job at the drop of a hat when something better comes along. I'm struggling to find even entry level office work that doesn't already ask for significant prior experience.
What? How can you make that assumption before you even apply? I had a maths degree with no experience and got picked for a Christmas temp position. The decision to hire you is up to them, not you.

Maybe you will quit at the drop of a hat, but have you considered that they just need intelligent people to offer a good level of customer service for a short period of time?

Retail is a dynamic environment. People leave left right and centre; managers know this, and they plan for it.
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phunky_fresh
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You have nothing to lose!!!!!!! The worst they can say is no. When I left uni I heard of a job opening in retail, I went for it and got it. A job is better than a huge gap on your CV!
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Sir_Miah
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(Original post by wanderlust.xx)
What? How can you make that assumption before you even apply? I had a maths degree with no experience and got picked for a Christmas temp position. The decision to hire you is up to them, not you.

Maybe you will quit at the drop of a hat, but have you considered that they just need intelligent people to offer a good level of customer service for a short period of time?

Retail is a dynamic environment. People leave left right and centre; managers know this, and they plan for it.
I cmpletely agree with this. Retail is dynamic and managers expect staff to leave and are always prepared for it. I went into retail with a Physics degree and no work experience as Xmas temp.

They didn't seem phased at all by the fact that I had no work experience but were willing to give me the job as I had been part of two committees in uni (in your case you would emphasise on the voluntary work you have done since it is more recent). They are more interested in people who are intelligent and learn quickly as opposed to someone 'dumb' and unlikely to outgrow the job like many people believe.
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bootyhole
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I've been unemployed for around 2 and a half years bruh, albiet the once a week part time crappy wage slave work I did. Sums up the scummy baby boomer generation...

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bootyhole
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I think you should think more practically. Do you want to spend the rest of your life shining shoes and kissing ass to survive?
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bootyhole
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(Original post by wanderlust.xx)
What? How can you make that assumption before you even apply? I had a maths degree with no experience and got picked for a Christmas temp position. The decision to hire you is up to them, not you.

Maybe you will quit at the drop of a hat, but have you considered that they just need intelligent people to offer a good level of customer service for a short period of time?

Retail is a dynamic environment. People leave left right and centre; managers know this, and they plan for it.
If only everyone was as smart as you...
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Ezekiel
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I'm 25 and I'm in a very similar situation I have a Masters degree. I graduated in December. My first Degree was in Politics and International Studies at Loughborough University 2:1 and the Masters is from the University of Leeds. I have had a few interviews and that's it.

I do believe graduates are overqualified, and whilst it's true that managers plan for people leaving, when you have literally hundreds of 'uneducated people' applying for 'silly jobs' why would you employ a graduate you know will leave after you spend hundreds of pounds training them. This is especially true if you're in a big city like Leeds or London. Anybody can be nice and deploy common sense, last year during my course I was told that I was overqualified by a Sainsbury's manager, he specifically said graduates leave when I asked him for feedback. Furthermore, if you work in retail it's best to avoid graduates because they do not have any sort of vested interest in the company doing well.


On your CV present your volunteering as an actual job. Also if possible avoid jobs that require you to submit an application, target Jobs that ask for CVs because you can sell yourself much better. But either way present volunteering as a Job. I've been on the hiring side of things and applications are a fantastic way to chuck people in the bin for having gaps and not enough experience.

If I was you I'd stay on JSA/Benefits for as long as possible until you get a entry level job. There is absolutely no point working in retail unless you are financially destitute because 6 months down the road you still will not have the skills that are currently lacking on your CV/ in your interview performance. If you got a job with Tesco why should any decent company employ you in a years time?When will be a good time to leave retail ? Also get off the workfare scheme and just get an internship.

It's cutthroat especially in London. Personalty I wouldn't have a problem with beefing out a CV and underscoring core skills in a fictitious role. I have worked in Woolworth's, they've gone bust. Can anybody check? No, can I give an employer a reference ? No.

Your first priority in my opinion should be finding any admin role, avoid stupid places like builders yards etc aim for any type of business, an estate agents or something and then use that as a platform for something at a later date. Call centers are good because they're respectable and they'll free you up to intern.
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member9876
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Call centre jobs are terrible pay is awful too
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Ezekiel
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(Original post by member9876)
Call centre jobs are terrible pay is awful too
Yes , I agree but they tick lots of boxes which will allow you to put things on your Cv. For example : Targets/Sales, High pressure Environment, Customer Service, Team building skills, administration. Very few jobs will allow you to talk about all those things.
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M1011
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(Original post by wanderlust.xx)
I am genuinely surprised. Are you being picky? You have a 2:2 in history, and that means something. You could at least do something like a retail job.

If you come back and reply with some pitiful excuse, then that's your answer. The hardest truth to understand once you graduate is that your degree entitles you to nothing, and neither does your previous experience. What matters is how you perform in whatever role you are given, and whether you demonstrate a strong work ethic. Do that, and you'll be offered a job anywhere.

First step - get any paid job and work yourself up from the bottom of the food chain. Stop trying to jump in half way. Get any job, work hard, then find another.
Kind of unclear what you're trying to say here
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Pads
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I'm going to get negged here.

You are unemployed because you are not applying to jobs that you think are below you.

If you arent applying to jobs you are likely to get because you think you can do better you dont deserve to be signed on to benefits. You say you signed on within a week of finishing your exams. You didnt even give searching for jobs a chance before you wanted free money.

I work with people with degrees(I dont have one) and they may not have thought they would be in the same job as me but spending time in education doesnt get you anywhere unless you actually work for it and sell yourself. Use jobs as stepping stones as any experience at the moment is better for you than a CV that says you signed on benefits for 3 years and didnt apply to jobs that could help you.
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LexiswasmyNexis
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(Original post by Pads)
I'm going to get negged here.

You are unemployed because you are not applying to jobs that you think are below you.

If you arent applying to jobs you are likely to get because you think you can do better you dont deserve to be signed on to benefits. You say you signed on within a week of finishing your exams. You didnt even give searching for jobs a chance before you wanted free money.

I work with people with degrees(I dont have one) and they may not have thought they would be in the same job as me but spending time in education doesnt get you anywhere unless you actually work for it and sell yourself. Use jobs as stepping stones as any experience at the moment is better for you than a CV that says you signed on benefits for 3 years and didnt apply to jobs that could help you.
No negs from me for this good post.


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