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    Let's say you graduated, college or university doesn't matter. You looked for a job and made 100s of applications and received no response from any of them. Would you consider offering to work for free?

    Soon after I graduated, I thought about this a lot. I came to a conclusion that I can't work for free. I don't think I can act professionally when I am not getting paid. There is no incentive for me to work at all.

    I can't do an office job that doesn't pay. Doesn't matter if it's a world-class company or an exciting start-up. I'd rather become a min. wage catering person.
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    Sometimes you have to do voluntary work in order to gain the experience you need to progress through your career. I would like to get into the accounting business after my degree in 3 years time but I already know that I'll probably need to volunteer to gain experience before I'm taken seriously enough to get a job that pays me while I get the necessary qualifications.

    There's no reason why you can't do a part time catering job and voluntary work at the same time though right?
    Alternatively you could volunteer and claim Job seekers allowance.
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    The question is more hypothetical. I am not asking for a solution. As far as I am concerned, volunteer work adds no value whatsoever to your CV. I am speaking as a person who has done volunteer work alongside my study. In my personal opinion, only paid and relevant internships add value.

    There are volunteering opportunities that could create value. You could work in the CAB (cit. ad. bu.) as an advisor. You could start a charitable enterprise. You will be given credit for your entrepreneurship and willing/boldness to do something new. Only these seem to create value.

    Other volunteering opportunities are 1) managed by people who are passionate about the cause, 2) for old and/or retired people with time to spare, 3) for successful people whose company forces/encourages them to do volunteering.
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    (Original post by WhatIsThis?)
    The question is more hypothetical. I am not asking for a solution. As far as I am concerned, volunteer work adds no value whatsoever to your CV. I am speaking as a person who has done volunteer work alongside my study. In my personal opinion, only paid and relevant internships add value.

    There are volunteering opportunities that could create value. You could work in the CAB (cit. ad. bu.) as an advisor. You could start a charitable enterprise. You will be given credit for your entrepreneurship and willing/boldness to do something new. Only these seem to create value.

    Other volunteering opportunities are 1) managed by people who are passionate about the cause, 2) for old and/or retired people with time to spare, 3) for successful people whose company forces/encourages them to do volunteering.
    I've done volunteering before, but i think it works best as a short term thing, maybe 1-2 weeks at the most. Then you have enough experience to be able to answer various competency questions etc but you're not spending so long that it impacts on you doing other things. I've previously volunteered at places then been taken on in a paid role so having that opportunity is very helpful. I'd disagree about it not adding value to a CV - if you have some relevant experience there then it is useful.
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    (Original post by ttoby)
    I've done volunteering before, but i think it works best as a short term thing, maybe 1-2 weeks at the most. Then you have enough experience to be able to answer various competency questions etc but you're not spending so long that it impacts on you doing other things. I've previously volunteered at places then been taken on in a paid role so having that opportunity is very helpful. I'd disagree about it not adding value to a CV - if you have some relevant experience there then it is useful.
    I think there are a lot of things one can't learn from doing volunteer work. At the end of the day, it's volunteer work. You do not have this urge/willingness/passion to excel. Once novelty wears off, volunteering becomes dull, repetitive and makes you question why you are doing it. So yes, I agree with you. 1 week at the most.

    If your a toilet cleaner, you don't question why you are doing it. You clean the toilets to make living.
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    I have asked this question because a lot of people at uni, at least at mine, were advised to do volunteering work by career advisors. I'd say get a paying job. Even a bar job teaches you more work ethics and moral than most volunteering work.
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    No, I volunteer one day a week atm and don't want to do more.
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    (Original post by WhatIsThis?)
    Would you consider offering to work for free?
    What is this magical quality that differentiates working for free and volunteering? Organisations that have a business model that can manage the quality/regularity/dedication of people doing useful work for free, use volunteers. Those organisations that don't have a business model that can use people of variable quality/regularity/dedication, pay people to do the work.

    Traditional employers can't use volunteers to do paid work - try getting that one past the other employees, the unions, the unemployed etc!
 
 
 
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