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    Hi all As a prospective student, I've seen this kind of thread for other universities, so would be interesting to start one here. So, what do you wish people had told you about before starting at the University of Aberdeen?
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    (Original post by hermitthefrog)
    That in the winter they don't grit seaton park and getting up/down that hill in the height of winter is impossible.


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    Extend that to absolutely everything in Aberdeen, hahaha. The gritters only come out when the snow/ice has been around for 3 weeks.
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    I second that for the whole region, I am out in Aberdeenshire and they are dreadful with the grit, although we are getting slightly better out here.
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    The seagulls will most likely get you in the end.
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    That the Union Bar is not a Union Bar, but in fact a hole in the ground only accessible to freshers.
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    Having been born in Aberdeen and spent the last 25 years there, I'll tell you this for free:

    It's expensive like you won't know unless you happen to have spent any time in London.

    Aberdeen is the 2nd most expensive in the UK (After London) and the 17th most expensive in the world. Be prepared to pay through the nose for such luxuries as a roof over your head, and the use of public transport. On the brightside, its low crime rate and lovely granite make it much preferable to Dundee.
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    (Original post by Terrorfex)

    Aberdeen is the 2nd most expensive in the UK (After London) and the 17th most expensive in the world. Be prepared to pay through the nose for such luxuries as a roof over your head, and the use of public transport. On the brightside, its low crime rate and lovely granite make it much preferable to Dundee.

    Where on Earth did you pull that statistic from? :lolwut:.

    What about Bath, Oxford, Edinburgh, Belfast?

    It's not cheap if you go to all the expensive places, but I have a cheaper night out and can generally afford to live at a cheaper rate in Aberdeen than I can in Liverpool. It's all about knowing where to go to take advantage of the cheap deals, which of course you discover in due course as a student living in the city.
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    (Original post by Ultimate_Geek)
    Where on Earth did you pull that statistic from? :lolwut:.

    What about Bath, Oxford, Edinburgh, Belfast?

    It's not cheap if you go to all the expensive places, but I have a cheaper night out and can generally afford to live at a cheaper rate in Aberdeen than I can in Liverpool. It's all about knowing where to go to take advantage of the cheap deals, which of course you discover in due course as a student living in the city.
    How did you find swapping Liverpool for Aberdeen? I'm coming from Manchester which is similiar to Liverpool in size but I'm abit worried about Aberdeen being a bit rural or small for me coming from a big city. Also being so far away from family is a bit of a bummer, how do you get back to Liverpool when terms have ended?
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    (Original post by dawg)
    How did you find swapping Liverpool for Aberdeen? I'm coming from Manchester which is similar to Liverpool in size but I'm a bit worried about Aberdeen being a bit rural or small for me coming from a big city. Also being so far away from family is a bit of a bummer, how do you get back to Liverpool when terms have ended?
    Have you visited the uni itself? I would seriously recommend it so you can get a proper vibe and feel of the place.

    I prefer Aberdeen I think. It's more geared towards students and although it's buzzing and full of life, it's smaller and more town-like than Liverpool or Manchester. There seems to always be something to do and the night-life is brilliant.

    I'm over big cities (nearly went to KCL) and like how easy it is to get to everything in Aberdeen. I wouldn't class it as rural though. I find it's quite nice to be able to get out of the 'city-living' very easily if you want to. Stonehaven, a really picturesque fishing port is only 15 mins away by train and it is absolutely gorgeous. Plus, even a trip to the beach or just staying in Old Aberdeen away from the city centre (which is about a 20/30 min walk away) is enough R & R for me .

    I've just returned from a year abroad so the distance doesn't seem to massive for me anymore . That said, it's really not that far away and the train journey up there is really nice. You got through the most beautiful countryside, and once your past the Forth bridge you just zip up the East coast to Aberdeen which is stunning. You only have to change once at Edinburgh (I'd recommend Waverly over Haymarket) and Bob's your uncle . I'd also advise getting a railcard to save a substantial amount of dosh.

    Let me know if you want to know anymore .
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    (Original post by Ultimate_Geek)
    Where on Earth did you pull that statistic from? :lolwut:.

    What about Bath, Oxford, Edinburgh, Belfast?

    It's not cheap if you go to all the expensive places, but I have a cheaper night out and can generally afford to live at a cheaper rate in Aberdeen than I can in Liverpool. It's all about knowing where to go to take advantage of the cheap deals, which of course you discover in due course as a student living in the city.
    Here's the link to the Guardian article, within which you can download the data Mercer used.

    You don't need that data to appreciate Aberdeen is an extremely expensive place to live. A quick perusal of average rents across a wide range of homes, and the cost of transport (Both First Bus and via the East Coat Main Line) will give an obvious indication. I'm not talking about nights out, or things to do. I'm talking about the fundamental cost of living in the city, commuting in, out and around it. These are considerable, and I'd be genuinely surprised if anyone who's lived in Aberdeen would disagree with me in saying it.

    Also, forgive me for saying this but I can't believe anyone would think it easy to get anywhere in Aberdeen. The entire transport system is a compacted, slow-moving merry-go-round that can be fundamentally disrupted by a decent few inches of snow or the closure of one of a number of 19th-century streets. Like many other cities, perhaps, but anyone who's lived there can attest (at the likes of Haudagain Roundabout, Bridge of Dee, King Street, Dyce, etc.) that the entire city is all but gridlocked between 0800 - 1000 and 1500 - 1800.

    Being Aberdonian born and bred, this may seem like an unnecessary negative view but it's the truth. Every city has its drawbacks but some of those drawbacks affect certain demographics more than others. Remove the cost of living, and Aberdeen is a wonderful city to study in but unless you're free of financial concerns, plan very well ahead unless you're staying in halls.

    Those issues aside, it is easily one of the best places in Scotland to study - even if you won't oft see the Northern Lights.
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    (Original post by Ultimate_Geek)
    The seagulls will most likely get you in the end.
    I second this statement. Expect to be crapped all over at least once a month
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    (Original post by Terrorfex)
    Here's the link to the Guardian article, within which you can download the data Mercer used.

    You don't need that data to appreciate Aberdeen is an extremely expensive place to live. A quick perusal of average rents across a wide range of homes, and the cost of transport (Both First Bus and via the East Coat Main Line) will give an obvious indication. I'm not talking about nights out, or things to do. I'm talking about the fundamental cost of living in the city, commuting in, out and around it. These are considerable, and I'd be genuinely surprised if anyone who's lived in Aberdeen would disagree with me in saying it.

    Also, forgive me for saying this but I can't believe anyone would think it easy to get anywhere in Aberdeen. The entire transport system is a compacted, slow-moving merry-go-round that can be fundamentally disrupted by a decent few inches of snow or the closure of one of a number of 19th-century streets. Like many other cities, perhaps, but anyone who's lived there can attest (at the likes of Haudagain Roundabout, Bridge of Dee, King Street, Dyce, etc.) that the entire city is all but gridlocked between 0800 - 1000 and 1500 - 1800.

    Being Aberdonian born and bred, this may seem like an unnecessary negative view but it's the truth. Every city has its drawbacks but some of those drawbacks affect certain demographics more than others. Remove the cost of living, and Aberdeen is a wonderful city to study in but unless you're free of financial concerns, plan very well ahead unless you're staying in halls.

    Those issues aside, it is easily one of the best places in Scotland to study - even if you won't oft see the Northern Lights.
    Well, I haven't lived there as long as you and can only really compare it to Liverpool. It's much cheaper and easier for me to get around Aberdeen than it is in Liverpool :dontknow:.

    Anyway, OP, it's a cool place to live IMO.
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    (Original post by Terrorfex)
    Here's the link to the Guardian article, within which you can download the data Mercer used.

    You don't need that data to appreciate Aberdeen is an extremely expensive place to live. A quick perusal of average rents across a wide range of homes, and the cost of transport (Both First Bus and via the East Coat Main Line) will give an obvious indication. I'm not talking about nights out, or things to do. I'm talking about the fundamental cost of living in the city, commuting in, out and around it. These are considerable, and I'd be genuinely surprised if anyone who's lived in Aberdeen would disagree with me in saying it.

    Also, forgive me for saying this but I can't believe anyone would think it easy to get anywhere in Aberdeen. The entire transport system is a compacted, slow-moving merry-go-round that can be fundamentally disrupted by a decent few inches of snow or the closure of one of a number of 19th-century streets. Like many other cities, perhaps, but anyone who's lived there can attest (at the likes of Haudagain Roundabout, Bridge of Dee, King Street, Dyce, etc.) that the entire city is all but gridlocked between 0800 - 1000 and 1500 - 1800.

    Being Aberdonian born and bred, this may seem like an unnecessary negative view but it's the truth. Every city has its drawbacks but some of those drawbacks affect certain demographics more than others. Remove the cost of living, and Aberdeen is a wonderful city to study in but unless you're free of financial concerns, plan very well ahead unless you're staying in halls.

    Those issues aside, it is easily one of the best places in Scotland to study - even if you won't oft see the Northern Lights.
    Aberdeen is definitely the London of Scotland. I know property solicitors in Glasgow and Edinburgh who completely ignore Aberdeen when looking at the rise and fall of the property market because it essentially has its own!

    There's a lot of money in oil, and every business is out to charge oil industry fees to everyone living in Aberdeen simply because of that, hence the extortionate bus fares, rental rates, etc
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    (Original post by Terrorfex)
    Here's the link to the Guardian article, within which you can download the data Mercer used.

    You don't need that data to appreciate Aberdeen is an extremely expensive place to live. A quick perusal of average rents across a wide range of homes, and the cost of transport (Both First Bus and via the East Coat Main Line) will give an obvious indication. I'm not talking about nights out, or things to do. I'm talking about the fundamental cost of living in the city, commuting in, out and around it. These are considerable, and I'd be genuinely surprised if anyone who's lived in Aberdeen would disagree with me in saying it.

    Also, forgive me for saying this but I can't believe anyone would think it easy to get anywhere in Aberdeen. The entire transport system is a compacted, slow-moving merry-go-round that can be fundamentally disrupted by a decent few inches of snow or the closure of one of a number of 19th-century streets. Like many other cities, perhaps, but anyone who's lived there can attest (at the likes of Haudagain Roundabout, Bridge of Dee, King Street, Dyce, etc.) that the entire city is all but gridlocked between 0800 - 1000 and 1500 - 1800.

    Being Aberdonian born and bred, this may seem like an unnecessary negative view but it's the truth. Every city has its drawbacks but some of those drawbacks affect certain demographics more than others. Remove the cost of living, and Aberdeen is a wonderful city to study in but unless you're free of financial concerns, plan very well ahead unless you're staying in halls.

    Those issues aside, it is easily one of the best places in Scotland to study - even if you won't oft see the Northern Lights.
    Sorry, the part in bold made me laugh
 
 
 
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