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    Hi guys... so I recently bought my first car, a 1.2L 2000 Corsa. I learned to drive in a Corsa, but a later model with a bigger engine, either a 1.4 or 1.6.

    I've been really struggling to get to grips with this smaller car and decided that I'm gonna resell it and go for something different; I had perfect control of the clutch and everything in my instructor's car and pretty much never stalled it. However I've stalled my new car several times and just can't seem to get comfortable with it despite driving it quite a lot over the past week. I particularly stuggle on up-hills and had an absolute nightmate last week in uphill stop-&-start traffic. It needs quite a bit of revving to get it moving without stalling which I just can't seem to get used to; Most of the time, I either rev it too much which is a bit embarrasing, or stall it which is even more embarrassing.
    I handled this sort of situation perfectly in my instructor's car.

    So anyway... I'm currently looking at a 1997 1.7L Diesel Corsa (the insurance on both cars is pretty much the same), which I'm guessing I should be a lot more comfortable with due to the increased torque I'm guessing? Or is it just older models in general that are giving me a problem here?
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    every car will be different, you just need to get used to the biting point of the new car, and i think you should give it more than a week - took me about 3 weeks. The biting point that you are used to is pretty much unique to that car because you have to consider the age of the car / wear on the clutch / when the clutch was last replaced.
    Get an experienced driver to try out the car to make sure the car is not faulty or anything, just to be sure though!
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    (Original post by ak_93)
    every car will be different, you just need to get used to the biting point of the new car, and i think you should give it more than a week - took me about 3 weeks. The biting point that you are used to is pretty much unique to that car because you have to consider the age of the car / wear on the clutch / when the clutch was last replaced.
    Get an experienced driver to try out the car to make sure the car is not faulty or anything, just to be sure though!
    Yeah my uncle has driven the car and it's mechanically fine. Just not for me, I can find the biting point no problem but I really want something that doesn't rely on so much gas to prevent stalling.
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    Go for an automatic if you can't use a clutch.
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    You probably learned in a Diesel and are still getting used to switching over to a small petrol engine.
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    (Original post by ak_93)
    every car will be different, you just need to get used to the biting point of the new car, and i think you should give it more than a week - took me about 3 weeks. The biting point that you are used to is pretty much unique to that car because you have to consider the age of the car / wear on the clutch / when the clutch was last replaced.
    Get an experienced driver to try out the car to make sure the car is not faulty or anything, just to be sure though!
    I agree.
    Give it a bit of time. You really need to give it more than a week to get used to your car. If you get a new one- you are only going to have to get used to that one as well. Every car is different- you are never going to get one the same as your old car- driving, clutch etc wise.
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    The 1.2 has a lot less grunt than the bigger engine siblings in the range.

    You just need to use a bit more throttle to set off to avoid stalling. You will need to work the engine harder to make progress - that's just physics. With these very small engines you almost need to thrash them. That's why people tend to go for something a little bigger.

    Give it another week and just try to drive it a little bit harder. You'll get the hang of it if you persevere!
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    I think people are misunderstanding me a bit, should have made myself a bit clearer. I've sufficiently driven a few manual cars that were a) pretty recent, b) all with engine sizes 1.4L and above, and c) petrol. I just wanted to know what made more of a difference to my situation here, the year the car was made or the size of the engine?
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    (Original post by Camoxide)
    You probably learned in a Diesel and are still getting used to switching over to a small petrol engine.
    Nah mate I learned in a petrol Corsa, but the engine was a bit bigger and it was a much more recent car. So my question was, was it so different because it's recent or because the engine is bigger.

    (Original post by FXX)
    Go for an automatic if you can't use a clutch.
    In fact, contrary to what you said, my instructor was always complimenting me on my efficiency in the use of the clutch.
    As I just said above, I've driven a few manual cars now and I've driven them all without problems. But they were recent and bigger engines. I just wanted to know whether it's the age or the engine size that makes more of a difference, if not both.
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    (Original post by WoodyMKC)
    Nah mate I learned in a petrol Corsa, but the engine was a bit bigger and it was a much more recent car. So my question was, was it so different because it's recent or because the engine is bigger.



    In fact, contrary to what you said, my instructor was always complimenting me on my efficiency in the use of the clutch.
    As I just said above, I've driven a few manual cars now and I've driven them all without problems. But they were recent and bigger engines. I just wanted to know whether it's the age or the engine size that makes more of a difference, if not both.
    Well the older 1.2 had about 60 horse power (when new) and the newer ones have 90 horse power (1.4 engine) so you're losing about a third of the power.
    It's probably a combination of the two, less power and older car.
    Old small cars are generally harder to drive than their newer counterparts. They're also a lot noisier than their newer versions so you might not even be revving the car as high as you think.

    You'll just have to get used to revving higher and slipping the clutch a bit more. Especially if you've got passengers.

    If it's got a clutch cable you can usually just adjust it to change where it bites.
 
 
 
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