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Should I buy a single share (£5) in a few companies, just for fun? Watch

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    Hi all!

    As it says in the title, do you think it would be a good idea for me to buy a single share in one or maybe a few companies, just for fun? (Not as a proper investment tho!) The only cost a fiver per share, and it means I'd get a better idea of how they work. I'd even get to go to their Annual General Meetings every year (and get a 10p cheque as a share of the profits every year

    As a bonus, some give free stuff to their shareholders (even if you only have one share!), like free chewing gum from chewing-gum companies, free shopping vouchers from Marks and Spencers etc etc.

    Oh, and I could even get a share certificate to hang on my wall (or lock it in my non-existant safe!

    What do you think - worthwhile or a waste of time and effort?
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    (Original post by Mike926)
    Hi all!

    As it says in the title, do you think it would be a good idea for me to buy a single share in one or maybe a few companies, just for fun? (Not as a proper investment tho!) The only cost a fiver per share, and it means I'd get a better idea of how they work. I'd even get to go to their Annual General Meetings every year (and get a 10p cheque as a share of the profits every year

    As a bonus, some give free stuff to their shareholders (even if you only have one share!), like free chewing gum from chewing-gum companies, free shopping vouchers from Marks and Spencers etc etc.

    Oh, and I could even get a share certificate to hang on my wall (or lock it in my non-existant safe!

    What do you think - worthwhile or a waste of time and effort?
    I think it's a good idea even though you will only get little return, one day that little company might be making millions
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    I think the smarter option is to put the money in a petri dish and wait for it to replicate by mitosis.
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    Do it! It might not be massively rewarding, but it's something interesting to tell people and you would get an insight into the world of business! Never even thought of doing this... might try it myself!
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    Most online brokers will charge you £7-12 per trade, so probably isn't worth it unless you can buy them direct from the company or something.
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    (Original post by lemonadeX)
    Most online brokers will charge you £7-12 per trade, so probably isn't worth it unless you can buy them direct from the company or something.
    You're right about that! I think some online-only ones charge only 5£, but I'd like to get a share certificate and stuff so that'll probably cost more. In any case, I'm not really seeing it as an investment, so even if I had to pay a little over the odds (heck, even twice as much ) it's no big deal, as long as I'm within my 15£ budget. I'm not planning to get rich with this - it's more of a game with all the silly perks (and learning experiences too, I guess) that I mentioned above.
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    As a previous poster said, you will have to pay dealing charges and stamp duty. The cheapest ways to buy shares often exclude you from the shareholder perks as they are held in nominee accounts, not in your name. So check with the broker whether or not the share purchase entitles you to any share holder perks, you may not even get notification of annual reports. Dealing in paper shares is a pain these days.

    Factor in the cost of getting to the AGM and your token purchase can end up costing you a lot. Many companies try to minimise the number of small shareholders by imposing minimum holdings for perks or buying out small share holders. Also some brokers charge you account maintenance fees or inactivity fees.

    But if you have a low cost method of buying shares, it can be fun to exercise your rights as a shareholder.
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    If I were you I would look into penny stocks for tech companies.
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    I could be wrong, but don't think you'll get an actual share certificate these days. Most shares are held electronically.

    If you want to learn about shares why not open a demo account, you get a free account with 15k of imaginary money to invest as you see fit. Good practice for the real thing.
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    (Original post by jacketpotato)
    I could be wrong, but don't think you'll get an actual share certificate these days. Most shares are held electronically.

    If you want to learn about shares why not open a demo account, you get a free account with 15k of imaginary money to invest as you see fit. Good practice for the real thing.
    I believe you can request them probablyat an extra cost though.
    I have one if that helps? :P
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    In the UK, you can still get share certificates (for free) if the shares are in your name rather than in the broker's name . It costs around £20 to buy shares in your own name, but it means the shares are yours, and you don't need to pay monthly fees to the broker any more. You can even sell your shares on directly without commission (if you can personally find somebody to buy them off you).

    I'm not too keen in day-trading, trying to make money etc - it's more of a casino environment. I'd prefer to just buy a share or two, keep them for a few years, and thus be part of a company as it rises (or falls). It's not about the money, it's about the experience, I'd say.

    And penny stocks... why bother when proper companies like M&S are just a fiver?
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    (Original post by Mike926)
    In the UK, you can still get share certificates (for free) if the shares are in your name rather than in the broker's name . It costs around £20 to buy shares in your own name, but it means the shares are yours, and you don't need to pay monthly fees to the broker any more. You can even sell your shares on directly without commission (if you can personally find somebody to buy them off you).

    I'm not too keen in day-trading, trying to make money etc - it's more of a casino environment. I'd prefer to just buy a share or two, keep them for a few years, and thus be part of a company as it rises (or falls). It's not about the money, it's about the experience, I'd say.

    And penny stocks... why bother when proper companies like M&S are just a fiver?
    What this fellow said basically.

    I also found the problem in trading in stocks especially through agents is they charge a hefty premium for the privilige, lloyds does £15 per trade so unless youre bulk buying or what have you it maskes it a little harder.
 
 
 
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