This discussion is closed.
JrW
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 16 years ago
#1
One of my close friends is about to study Engineering at Cambridge. Is engineerng a very respected degree (on behalf of him) and is it seen by other students as one of the less respectable courses?
0
Helenia
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 16 years ago
#2
(Original post by jamierwilliams)
One of my close friends is about to study Engineering at Cambridge. Is engineerng a very respected degree (on behalf of him) and is it seen by other students as one of the less respectable courses?
Tis OK. Don't really have much of an opinion either way - our engineers are an ok bunch.
0
JrW
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 16 years ago
#3
is it as respected as a course like Natural Sciences?
0
Helenia
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#4
Report 16 years ago
#4
(Original post by jamierwilliams)
is it as respected as a course like Natural Sciences?
Define "respected." The medics take the piss out of the NatScis (esp Biological) quite a lot cos they're a bunch of wannabe medics (that's our story, not theirs ) but really we get on with them ok. Engineering is not a doss course, that's for sure, and no-one will take the piss out of you for doing it. Why is your friend worried?
0
JrW
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 16 years ago
#5
i think it is because it is not one of the traditional subjects like History, english, medicine or law
0
MadNatSci
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#6
Report 16 years ago
#6
(Original post by Helenia)
Define "respected." The medics take the piss out of the NatScis (esp Biological) quite a lot cos they're a bunch of wannabe medics
No comment...

Yeah, I'd say engineering is very well respected - and our engineers are a bunch of stars. And they work damned hard. More 9ams than the medics, anyway (5 as opposed to 4)
0
Alaric
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#7
Report 16 years ago
#7
(Original post by MadNatSci)
More 9ams than the medics, anyway (5 as opposed to 4)
Bleh, I had 6 9ams last year and will have at least 3 again next year

Engineering is well respected, they do apparently work you hard, though having met a former Cambridge Engineer it doesn't sound like they work you as hard as they did thirty years ago! Some people regard Imperial as better than Cambridge - don't know if it's true - but it's why a friend declined his Cambridge offer.

Alaric.
0
Joey_Johns
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#8
Report 16 years ago
#8
(Original post by Alaric)
Bleh, I had 6 9ams last year and will have at least 3 again next year

Engineering is well respected, they do apparently work you hard, though having met a former Cambridge Engineer it doesn't sound like they work you as hard as they did thirty years ago! Some people regard Imperial as better than Cambridge - don't know if it's true - but it's why a friend declined his Cambridge offer.

Alaric.
My dad is one of those worked very hard 30 years ago. Well more like 20 years, but anyway he maintains it is a very hard. Compared to me he is a maths genius, I seriously wouldnt even attempt doing Engineering at that standard if you arent up to FUrther MAths standard.
0
Mysticmin
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#9
Report 16 years ago
#9
(Original post by Joey_Johns)
My dad is one of those worked very hard 30 years ago. Well more like 20 years, but anyway he maintains it is a very hard. Compared to me he is a maths genius, I seriously wouldnt even attempt doing Engineering at that standard if you arent up to FUrther MAths standard.
Asymmetric information really irritates me. It's hard to judge if you're good enough for a degree or not because most students can only compare themselves with other people in their school and a select group outside.

And when you ask "how hard is an X degree" you don't get a very helpful answer.

So...here goes, someone give me an example of a problem a first year undergrad engineer at cambridge has to deal with?
0
Joey_Johns
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#10
Report 16 years ago
#10
(Original post by Mysticmin)
Asymmetric information really irritates me. It's hard to judge if you're good enough for a degree or not because most students can only compare themselves with other people in their school and a select group outside.

And when you ask "how hard is an X degree" you don't get a very helpful answer.

So...here goes, someone give me an example of a problem a first year undergrad engineer at cambridge has to deal with?
To be good at Engineering, you have to be excellent at maths. There is no other way around it. Its not hard to figure out, a person knows if they are good at maths or not.
0
Mysticmin
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#11
Report 16 years ago
#11
(Original post by Joey_Johns)
To be good at Engineering, you have to be excellent at maths. There is no other way around it. Its not hard to figure out, a person knows if they are good at maths or not.
Not true, comparatively at my school I am excellent at maths, top four I'd say (no arrogance meant). But in the real world? I don't think so somehow.
0
Joey_Johns
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#12
Report 16 years ago
#12
(Original post by Mysticmin)
Not true, comparatively at my school I am excellent at maths, top four I'd say (no arrogance meant). But in the real world? I don't think so somehow.
I originally said you should be of further maths standard. With respect, that means you are very good. Its the standard you need to be at. What your standard is, quite frankly is irrelevant.
0
rags94
Badges: 0
#13
Report 16 years ago
#13
(Original post by Joey_Johns)
I originally said you should be of further maths standard. With respect, that means you are very good. Its the standard you need to be at. What your standard is, quite frankly is irrelevant.

I don't think that a engineering degree is heavily reliant on maths. Am currently doing civil engineering in umist in ma second year and i got a B in Normal A Level Maths and am currently coping quite well in fact. I think a persons mathematical accumen for engineering degrees may need to do be good for some engineering fields and not others as it varies on what field u study not all engineering degrees are the same. For instance as i do civil engineering i know for a fact that the maths level required for civil engineering is not as hard as that required for electronic engineering. In todays world the mathemaical side of the engineering has been drastically reduced due to advances in technology. Therefore you as an aspiring engineer have to adept in other areas and not just maths. I feel a engineer has to be versitile and has to know and understand the physicy of people in order to be successful. For anyone who reads this message don't be afraid to take up a engineering degree just beacuse someone scares you about the level of maths required all u need to have is belief and also know what ur getting ur self into as thats why most people fail in university beacuse they pick a wrong course. If you can get a A-B in A Level Maths and physics Then I don't think you'll struggle in uni with an engineering degree as long as you obviously work hard. ANYONE THINKING OF DOING A ENGINEERING DEGREE I WOULD HIGHTLY RECOMMEND THIS AS ENGINEERING OPENS UP MANY DOORS TO OTHER CAREERS AND IF YOU BECAOME CHARTED AND THATS PROBALY BY THE TIME YOUR 28-29 YOU'LL BE ON £50,000. iT WILL ALL PAY OFF WORK HARD NOW AND RELAX LATER IN THE FUTURE....GOODDDDDDD LUCKKKKKKKKKK!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!
0
Mysticmin
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#14
Report 16 years ago
#14
(Original post by Joey_Johns)
I originally said you should be of further maths standard. With respect, that means you are very good. Its the standard you need to be at. What your standard is, quite frankly is irrelevant.
but I am doing further maths
0
Joey_Johns
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#15
Report 16 years ago
#15
(Original post by Mysticmin)
but I am doing further maths
Then i'm sure you would be able to do Engineering at Cambridge. Given of course you get an A in normal MAths.
0
Joey_Johns
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#16
Report 16 years ago
#16
(Original post by rags94)
I don't think that a engineering degree is heavily reliant on maths. Am currently doing civil engineering in umist in ma second year and i got a B in Normal A Level Maths and am currently coping quite well in fact. I think a persons mathematical accumen for engineering degrees may need to do be good for some engineering fields and not others as it varies on what field u study not all engineering degrees are the same. For instance as i do civil engineering i know for a fact that the maths level required for civil engineering is not as hard as that required for electronic engineering. In todays world the mathemaical side of the engineering has been drastically reduced due to advances in technology. Therefore you as an aspiring engineer have to adept in other areas and not just maths. I feel a engineer has to be versitile and has to know and understand the physicy of people in order to be successful. For anyone who reads this message don't be afraid to take up a engineering degree just beacuse someone scares you about the level of maths required all u need to have is belief and also know what ur getting ur self into as thats why most people fail in university beacuse they pick a wrong course. If you can get a A-B in A Level Maths and physics Then I don't think you'll struggle in uni with an engineering degree as long as you obviously work hard. ANYONE THINKING OF DOING A ENGINEERING DEGREE I WOULD HIGHTLY RECOMMEND THIS AS ENGINEERING OPENS UP MANY DOORS TO OTHER CAREERS AND IF YOU BECAOME CHARTED AND THATS PROBALY BY THE TIME YOUR 28-29 YOU'LL BE ON £50,000. iT WILL ALL PAY OFF WORK HARD NOW AND RELAX LATER IN THE FUTURE....GOODDDDDDD LUCKKKKKKKKKK!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!
This is going to sound harsh...but i'm going to say it anyway.

Obviously with a B in maths your not at Cambridge. They wont let you in without straight A's and an A in maths. We are talking about Cambridge University here, not your particular University, i'd assume the students at Cambridge are worked much harder that what you would, that is the whole point here, we arent talking about a standard uni.

My dad owns an engineering company. THere are few people earning £50k plus. About 3 of them and they are directors and none of them are under 40. The easiest way to earn that kind of money is to start your onw business. I'm sorry to inform you but the majority of engineers seldom earn over £30k especially in civil engineering.

Good luck to you though, you are obviously very enthusiastic about your chosen career.
0
Sazzle
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#17
Report 16 years ago
#17
The chartered civil engineers in our office (age 30-32) are earning 18-22k pa, yes there is money to be made in it but you'll find it hard to get a 50k job at 28 rags94.
0
figgetyfig
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#18
Report 16 years ago
#18
I'm starting Engineering at Cambridge in October, and have done some of my own research. Apparently it's one of the most heavily timetabled subjects, with around 40 hrs per week of lectures, and yes it is a respected degree. Not all Engineering graduates become Engineers, the mathematical and industrial content of the course makes it a good degree for careers in Business and Finance as well as in Industry and Engineering.

I was made an offer, and I don't do A-level further maths, because it's only offered to AS-level at my school.

Make of that what you will, but the impression I got is that they wouldn't have made me the offer if they didn't think my maths skills were up to it, most of my interview involved me talking through maths-related problems which they set me, both orally and on paper, and they collected all my notes in afterwards, clearly wanting to have a look at my methodology.

I did ask about the standard of maths and about whether I'd cope having only done AS-level further maths, and they said that they wouldn't make me an offer if they didn't think I could cope.
0
Mysticmin
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#19
Report 16 years ago
#19
(Original post by figgetyfig)
I'm starting Engineering at Cambridge in October, and have done some of my own research. Apparently it's one of the most heavily timetabled subjects, with around 40 hrs per week of lectures, and yes it is a respected degree. Not all Engineering graduates become Engineers, the mathematical and industrial content of the course makes it a good degree for careers in Business and Finance as well as in Industry and Engineering.

I was made an offer, and I don't do A-level further maths, because it's only offered to AS-level at my school.

Make of that what you will, but the impression I got is that they wouldn't have made me the offer if they didn't think my maths skills were up to it, most of my interview involved me talking through maths-related problems which they set me, both orally and on paper, and they collected all my notes in afterwards, clearly wanting to have a look at my methodology.

I did ask about the standard of maths and about whether I'd cope having only done AS-level further maths, and they said that they wouldn't make me an offer if they didn't think I could cope.
What sort of maths stuff did they set you? I'm awful at doing maths in interviews, i like scribbling on a piece of paper. The only oral stuff i can do is mechanics.
0
Joey_Johns
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#20
Report 16 years ago
#20
(Original post by Mysticmin)
What sort of maths stuff did they set you? I'm awful at doing maths in interviews, i like scribbling on a piece of paper. The only oral stuff i can do is mechanics.
So, do you believe me now?
0
X
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

If you're planning on going to uni this year, would any of these financial reasons stop you?

Not being able to work now to save up for uni (92)
13.88%
Reduced household income due to coronavirus means I can't afford to go (55)
8.3%
Lack of part-time jobs to support me while I'm at uni (85)
12.82%
Lack of graduate job prospects when I finish uni (80)
12.07%
Other reasons are stopping me going (84)
12.67%
Nothing is stopping me going (267)
40.27%

Watched Threads

View All