Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta

mbchb mbbs bmbs mbbch bmbch vs Southampton BM watch

Announcements
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    I know all these are equal medical qualifications. And if you got them from a British medical school your good to go. But I also know they are a title you can pit after your name so would a soton grad feel a bit peed off to only have a BM as opposed to the MBChB or MBBS. ie dr Smith BM instead of dr Smith MBBS. And also why is it that Southampton dont offer an official bachelor of surgery qualification even though they can do surgery?
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by paul.dirac121)
    I know all these are equal medical qualifications. And if you got them from a British medical school your good to go. But I also know they are a title you can pit after your name so would a soton grad feel a bit peed off to only have a BM as opposed to the MBChB or MBBS. ie dr Smith BM instead of dr Smith MBBS. And also why is it that Southampton dont offer an official bachelor of surgery qualification even though they can do surgery?
    The fact that there's no 'surgery' in the name doesn't mean that the qualification is any less 'official' for the surgical skills part than it is anywhere else.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ronove)
    The fact that there's no 'surgery' in the name doesn't mean that the qualification is any less 'official' for the surgical skills part than it is anywhere else.
    I know exactly my point, so why did the uni decide to go against convention and not include a bachelour of surgery honours?
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by paul.dirac121)
    I know exactly my point, so why did the uni decide to go against convention and not include a bachelour of surgery honours?
    Oh OK, it wasn't entirely clear to me that you realised. And I have no idea, someone else might. I'd have just thought it had something to do with wanting to be different or something. Wikipedia has nothing. :confused:
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ronove)
    Oh OK, it wasn't entirely clear to me that you realised. And I have no idea, someone else might. I'd have just thought it had something to do with wanting to be different or something. Wikipedia has nothing. :confused:
    True, Wikipedia just states it is a medical qualification equal to mbbs mbchb etc, hmm maybe I should email Southampton to find out haha.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by YoungPhil)
    I've been looking at this myself recently as I'm considering going to Southampton. I've read on the Internet, can't remember exactly where, that when the medical school was set up, it was put to a vote and it was settled that 'BM' would make Southampton graduates unique.

    However, it IS equivalent and wouldn't put any burden on a surgical career.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Ohh is that why? BM does indeed make Southampton graduates unique, I dont think any other med schools offer the BM do they? But it could do with a few more letters lol.
    Where else you got offers from? Where you choosing?
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by paul.dirac121)
    I know all these are equal medical qualifications. And if you got them from a British medical school your good to go. But I also know they are a title you can pit after your name so would a soton grad feel a bit peed off to only have a BM as opposed to the MBChB or MBBS. ie dr Smith BM instead of dr Smith MBBS. And also why is it that Southampton dont offer an official bachelor of surgery qualification even though they can do surgery?
    It doesn't matter in practice though.

    Not to mention, by the time you get to the point where you're picking out headed notepaper as a consultant, you'll have far more letters after your name anyway: MRCP/FRCS, MD, diplomas, etc
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    I am a Southampton graduate. I want to do a semi surgical specialty. It matters not.
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by paul.dirac121)
    I know all these are equal medical qualifications. And if you got them from a British medical school your good to go. But I also know they are a title you can pit after your name so would a soton grad feel a bit peed off to only have a BM as opposed to the MBChB or MBBS. ie dr Smith BM instead of dr Smith MBBS. And also why is it that Southampton dont offer an official bachelor of surgery qualification even though they can do surgery?
    I agree i'm in favour of standardizing all the medical degrees. I would recommend MD as the primary medical qualification, since it is used in many places including the US.

    However, even if not I would still recommend all the MB ChB, MBBS, BMBS, BM, MB BChir, BM BCh and MB BCh BAOs all come together to ONE degree.

    Its so frustrating to have so many different degrees that all mean the same thing.
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    At the open day they said something about it being a 'modernisation' of the qualification? To be a little bit different etc.
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Study Helper
    (Original post by ukmed108)
    I agree i'm in favour of standardizing all the medical degrees. I would recommend MD as the primary medical qualification, since it is used in many places including the US.

    However, even if not I would still recommend all the MB ChB, MBBS, BMBS, BM, MB BChir, BM BCh and MB BCh BAOs all come together to ONE degree.

    Its so frustrating to have so many different degrees that all mean the same thing.
    The vast majority of countries offer medicine as an undergraduate degree, and thus, offer the bachelor's degree(s).

    They're all the exact same degrees, just with a different abbreviation. The only exceptions are Ireland with the "Bachelor in the Art of Obstetrics" plugged on at the end, and Soton with the BM - however, still equivalent qualifications.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    I think it's just so that it is unique. Similarly Oxford and Cambridge have slight variations on the MBBS theme. I guess the other MBChB variations were already taken.
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AnonymousPenguin)
    I think it's just so that it is unique. Similarly Oxford and Cambridge have slight variations on the MBBS theme. I guess the other MBChB variations were already taken.
    It lies with mainly the fact that none of the variations roll off the tongue easily. Its much easier to say MD then it is to say MB B----whatever your degree is.

    Generally the abbreviation of a degree is best kept at 3 letters or less with 4 being acceptable.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by paul.dirac121)
    I know all these are equal medical qualifications. And if you got them from a British medical school your good to go. But I also know they are a title you can pit after your name so would a soton grad feel a bit peed off to only have a BM as opposed to the MBChB or MBBS. ie dr Smith BM instead of dr Smith MBBS. And also why is it that Southampton dont offer an official bachelor of surgery qualification even though they can do surgery?

    Worry not. They've changed it to BMBS effective for current final years onwards. Not that it mattered anyway.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ukmed108)
    It lies with mainly the fact that none of the variations roll off the tongue easily. Its much easier to say MD then it is to say MB B----whatever your degree is.

    Generally the abbreviation of a degree is best kept at 3 letters or less with 4 being acceptable.
    Except that an MD is a postgraduate qualification in the UK. You don't leave medical school with a Doctorate, so the MD isn't going to catch on as a medical school qualification anytime soon. It's not as if anyone ever says what they have anyway, it's either written or you say 'doctor'.

    As for your last point, most UK grads have BA (Hons) or BSc (Hons) - that's 9/10 character spaces. MBChB is only five.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ukmed108)
    I agree i'm in favour of standardizing all the medical degrees. I would recommend MD as the primary medical qualification, since it is used in many places including the US.

    However, even if not I would still recommend all the MB ChB, MBBS, BMBS, BM, MB BChir, BM BCh and MB BCh BAOs all come together to ONE degree.

    Its so frustrating to have so many different degrees that all mean the same thing.
    I we were to offer medical degrees with nomenclature parallel to those in the US, MB would be the way to go.
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
    Except that an MD is a postgraduate qualification in the UK. You don't leave medical school with a Doctorate, so the MD isn't going to catch on as a medical school qualification anytime soon. It's not as if anyone ever says what they have anyway, it's either written or you say 'doctor'.

    As for your last point, most UK grads have BA (Hons) or BSc (Hons) - that's 9/10 character spaces. MBChB is only five.
    But no one actually says BA (hons) in practice and since the vast majority have (hons) its really fallen out of general usage. Most people say "bachelors" or "BA", "BSc" when speaking or writing.

    The MD was actually invented here in the UK, in Scotland actually and the degree given was an MD until the late 1800s in Scotland. Considering that we call physicians "doctors", it isn't terribly far-fetched to call the medical degree an MD.

    Australia has begun the process of switching from MB to MD.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ukmed108)
    But no one actually says BA (hons) in practice and since the vast majority have (hons) its really fallen out of general usage. Most people say "bachelors" or "BA", "BSc" when speaking or writing.

    The MD was actually invented here in the UK, in Scotland actually and the degree given was an MD until the late 1800s in Scotland. Considering that we call physicians "doctors", it isn't terribly far-fetched to call the medical degree an MD.

    Australia has begun the process of switching from MB to MD.
    So say we switch the undergraduate program to being an MD, what do you do with the postgrad lot getting their actual doctorate?
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    I am a current Southampton Student. We graduate with a BM (and BMedSci) but currently there is motions within the medical school student community to change to a title which reflects our surgery training more (eg BMBS). Ultimately, it makes no difference. Its exactly the same.

    When the course was set up they chose BM as it was unique and in the early 70's people liked to be different...its now tradition
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
    So say we switch the undergraduate program to being an MD, what do you do with the postgrad lot getting their actual doctorate?
    Australia switched their post-grad MDs to DMedSci. I think that would be an appropriate option for people who have already earned their degrees although i would seriously consider not offering the degree anymore. The PhD is already the world standard for research doctorates and many PhDs look on post-grad MDs as a watered down PhD.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: July 16, 2013
Poll
Do you agree with the proposed ban on plastic straws and cotton buds?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.