Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

What's the oldest age you would likely be accepted on a medicine course Watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Any ideas? Is it realistic for a 35 year old to get a place on the 4year or normal 5 year course? Having already had a long and successful career in something else.

    Or is it basically slim to no chance for someone over 30.

    I do know one guy in his 40s doing med school but that is in the US, what about in UK
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Yes, provided you meet the appropriate admissions requirements. The oldest student on my course was in her early 40s.
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    The oldest student on my course is 47-49


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Oldest student in my year is in his late thirties, but we're actually quite a "young" cohort - there are certainly students in their 40s and beyond in other years.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    For grad medicine, you can be any age. For undergrad same applies as long as you don't have another degree
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by tomtom415)
    For grad medicine, you can be any age. For undergrad same applies as long as you don't have another degree
    so if you already have a an undergrad degree, you cannot apply for normal medicine? surely there are 5 year courses for graduates or are there only 4 year ones
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    Graduates can apply to the 5/6 year courses.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by tomtom415)
    For grad medicine, you can be any age. For undergrad same applies as long as you don't have another degree
    That is only the case at certain universities, many other med schools will allow graduates into either the 4 or 5 year stream (at least they did when I applied...)
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Caponester)
    That is only the case at certain universities, many other med schools will allow graduates into either the 4 or 5 year stream (at least they did when I applied...)
    Theres a guy whose 51 years old in my year, there are plenty of 30+ in my course, at least 30-40 of them. And im on the undergrad course!
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    My tutors wife is about 40 ish and I think she's just graduated med school.
    Online

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by carcinoma)
    The oldest student on my course is 47-49


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    (Original post by Legit)
    Theres a guy whose 51 years old in my year,
    What on earth is the point in training these guys? By the time the med school and NHS has spent £100,000+ training them they'll literally be retiring! Those guys will need to be absolutely phenomenal foundation doctors or they'll just be a massive drain on the system.

    I think in my year the oldest undergrad was about 25 and oldest grad about 35.

    EDIT: it would be great if any one of the neggers made any attempt to explain how they can justify training a 51 year old...
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by nexttime)
    What on earth is the point in training these guys? By the time the med school and NHS has spent all those thousands and thousands of pounds training them they'll be retiring! Those guys will need to be absolutely phenomenal foundation doctors or they'll just be a massive drain on the system.

    I think in my year the oldest undergrad was about 25 and oldest grad about 35.
    Older med students bring with them a host of other life experiences, and skills from industry that can be extremely valuable in the NHS (both in the running/management of the NHS and in working/communicating with patients). In addition, older med students have a far lower drop out rate at med school (recent BMJ article if you want some hard evidence), so are far less likely to take up a place that ends up getting lost to the system completely. A mix of ages and experiences can also enrich the overall course experience for all. Speaking as one of 'these guys', I still expect to have 20-25 years to work with patients post-qualification... few of us will be retiring at 60 anymore! Personally, I value the opportunity to apply my existing skills and experience in a career that I have wanted to pursue full time for many years. I don't believe I will be a drain on the system.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Age is an interesting debate and there is no shortage of those in their 30s on my course. I remember seeing a good many in their 50s when taking the GAMSAT!

    From my observations the average age on my course is ~24 and everyone works pretty hard, but even those a little bit older (those 30>) seem to have a much better work ethic than the rest of us, so mature people do seem to make excellent students..

    Even on a graduate course they do however seem to find it more difficult to interact with the main crux of the cohort, and the "oldies" seem to group together and slightly detach from the rest of us; so that is worth considering. I can imagine trying to integrate with 18 year olds on a standard course could be tricky for someone in their 30s, and it is important to integrate as a cohort as you are together for a lot of years and do end up supporting each other on your medical journeys. (I understand this is a massive generalisation and doesn't apply to all).

    Family is also worth considering. Time demands of a family/pressure to have one, loss of income whilst studying and perhaps having to move house are important things to be aware of. So you must be sure the juice is worth the squeeze.

    As has been mentioned there is no age restriction or bias against you; it's merely you're own thoughts on the matter. I guess that most people in their 40's would be looking to be at the the height of their earning power, have a nice work life balance, have a good job where they're at the top of their game etc etc. So the question is, are you happy to invest a lot of time at medical school where you forgo income and accrue debt, to then qualify in a job where you'll be at the bottom of the ladder working 70 hours a week?

    Being able to enjoy the work and earning potential of a consultant for 30 years sweetens the deal for most, and makes up for the massive investment you make as a medic. If you'd be happy only enjoying the consultant life for 15years, then go for it. If not, there are plenty of jobs that I'm sure you'd enjoy, and probably makes more money for less aggravation doing.
    Online

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by HawkFlight)
    Older med students bring with them a host of other life experiences, and skills from industry that can be extremely valuable in the NHS (both in the running/management of the NHS and in working/communicating with patients). In addition, older med students have a far lower drop out rate at med school (recent BMJ article if you want some hard evidence), so are far less likely to take up a place that ends up getting lost to the system completely. A mix of ages and experiences can also enrich the overall course experience for all. Speaking as one of 'these guys', I still expect to have 20-25 years to work with patients post-qualification... few of us will be retiring at 60 anymore! Personally, I value the opportunity to apply my existing skills and experience in a career that I have wanted to pursue full time for many years. I don't believe I will be a drain on the system.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    You've missed my point.

    If you're working 20-25 years full time, the NHS is getting a good 60% of the time they'd get out of a 18 year old. That can be justified. I specifically quoted people who said they knew med students who were 49 and 51. Those guys are going to have barely 10 years to work before they retire, almost all of which will still be 'training', even if they continue to 65. In order for them to be worth the money, they need to be many times better than your standard 18 year old. They need to be truly, truly exceptional for that to be economically justified. But maybe that is the case, i dunno.

    Do you have a link to that article btw?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    There is no certainty that a school leaver will complete a medical degree and then dedicate 20 - 25 years to the NHS. It could be argued that a mature med student 49 - 51 will probably have contributed in many ways to society including through the tax system before fulling the selection criteria for med school.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Life as an F1/2 is pretty miserable and tough to handle when you're in your mid-20s - demanding physically, mentally and emotionally. I honestly wonder how well people in their 50s would cope with that - plenty of my consultants have said they couldn't go back and do it again now.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by DimaTae)
    Any ideas? Is it realistic for a 35 year old to get a place on the 4year or normal 5 year course? Having already had a long and successful career in something else.

    Or is it basically slim to no chance for someone over 30.

    I do know one guy in his 40s doing med school but that is in the US, what about in UK
    I started at 44.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by HawkFlight)
    Older med students bring with them a host of other life experiences, and skills from industry that can be extremely valuable in the NHS (both in the running/management of the NHS and in working/communicating with patients). In addition, older med students have a far lower drop out rate at med school (recent BMJ article if you want some hard evidence), so are far less likely to take up a place that ends up getting lost to the system completely. A mix of ages and experiences can also enrich the overall course experience for all. Speaking as one of 'these guys', I still expect to have 20-25 years to work with patients post-qualification... few of us will be retiring at 60 anymore! Personally, I value the opportunity to apply my existing skills and experience in a career that I have wanted to pursue full time for many years. I don't believe I will be a drain on the system.


    Posted from TSR Mobile

    the drop out rate is a good point, but there are fewer older med students than there are school leavers
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Helenia)
    Life as an F1/2 is pretty miserable and tough to handle when you're in your mid-20s - demanding physically, mentally and emotionally. I honestly wonder how well people in their 50s would cope with that - plenty of my consultants have said they couldn't go back and do it again now.
    Coping with my son who did not sleep through the night until he was over 2 years of age, being every 1.5 hrs has primed me for working as an FY1 I'm sure. He is 4 now and still manages to wake me during the night resulting me getting by on 4 hours sleep on occasion.

    Doing something I truly love and have dreamt of for years is all the motivation I need to cope with all doctoring will throw at me.

    With my life experiences, I'm pretty sure I'll probably cope emotionally better than a lot of the mid-20 year olds too.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sweetchilli)
    Coping with my son who did not sleep through the night until he was over 2 years of age, being every 1.5 hrs has primed me for working as an FY1 I'm sure. He is 4 now and still manages to wake me during the night resulting me getting by on 4 hours sleep on occasion.

    Doing something I truly love and have dreamt of for years is all the motivation I need to cope with all doctoring will through at me.

    With my life experiences, I'm pretty sure I'll probably cope emotionally better than a lot of the mid-20 year olds too.
    Yeah, we all thought that once. :moon:

    I'm not saying you won't cope, but that it's not something to be dismissed.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What's your favourite Christmas sweets?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.