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    I am currently doing my GCSE's which I finish next year and then I want to continue on to college to do my A levels, after this I would like to go to uni and do a primary education degree, specifically for children aged 3-7 (as. Would like to become an early years teacher) So far I know that I really want to do A levels in history, sociology and health and social care, I was also going to do English, however I don't really want to as I don't enjoy it much however I would never choose to do maths and definitely not science!! I'm not sure what else would be good for my take, maybe psychology but does this kind of overlap with sociology?? Also can I do this? Do I have to take a core, national curriculum subject?? If not can anybody suggest any other good A levels to take for the degree I am interested in doing?? On the website of the university I would like to go to there is no mention of specific A levels it just requires 5 GCSE's C or above (including English maths and science) and a minimum of 300 UCAS points, please help thankyoooo!
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    Each Uni sets its own requirements for subjects/grades. GCSEs are obviously of much lesser importance than A level grades as these show your intellectual level/promise. However, many Unis/subjects require specific GCSEs as a guide to your overall ability/breadth of education. The most common requirement is GSCE Maths/English in addition to specific A level grades/subjects.

    Each Uni sets its own requirements for each course. If you have checked the page for the course you are interested in (and the right year of entry, as requirements change) then that is what they require as a minimum. Remember that your actual and predicted grades are only part of your application - you also need a well thought out PS and a strong academic reference.
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    Is there another national curriculum subject that you could do, even to AS? This would give you more options for specialism in a teaching degree and give you more confidence in your knowledge as a teacher. English would certainly be a good option, or something like geography, RE or a language. This would be considered preferable to universities for teaching rather than three non NC subjects, but you also need to ensure that you pick subjects of interest to you which you are likely to do well in.
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    Cousin did Psychology and Maths as her first degree and then a post-grad PGCE. Another cousin did European History and then a PGCE. Both are now teaching in good Primary Schools. Brother did BEd Primary, realised in Year 2 he really didnt want to be a teacher after all, but finished his degree and now works in a bank.

    Doing the PGCE route gives you more options, particularly as most people understandably change their minds a great deal between 16 and 21 about what they might eventually do as a job. If you do a straight degree (ie. no education/teaching component) then you leave many more pathways still open to you, withthe 'always still there' option of then taking a PGCE if you decide at 21 that you still want to be a teacher. See http://www.education.gov.uk/get-into...-training/pgce
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    Thank you for all your replys I was just wondering isn't it more secondary school teacher that do PGCE's as they specialise in one particular subject?? Also what subjects do you advise at A level are good for primary school teacher (years 3-7) do I have to do one as maths, English or science because I don't really want to? Thanks for all your help!!


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    English would definatey be good, my school told everyone who wanted to be teachers they had to take 2 core subjects but that could be say English and History rather than maths and science! Also work experience is essential so after your GCSES you might want to start looking/organising sometime ready
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    (Original post by Fearless97)
    Thank you for all your replys I was just wondering isn't it more secondary school teacher that do PGCE's as they specialise in one particular subject?? Also what subjects do you advise at A level are good for primary school teacher (years 3-7) do I have to do one as maths, English or science because I don't really want to? Thanks for all your help!!


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    Pgce's are for all teachers. My sister did a music degree, then a pgce and is now a primary school teacher.
    My other sister is currently doing a history degree, going on to do a pgce and then primary school teaching. Most primary school teachers at my old primary have degrees then pgces, so it's not just secondary school teachers. It just depends how sure you are that you want to definitely do teaching.

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    I looked a while ago and it said to include national curriculum subjects, including the obvious (maths, english, sciences) but it can also include subjects like Art and ICT.
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    Thanks so what are classed as core/national curriculum subjects??


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    "At least one from Art, Biology, CACHE, Chemistry, Design and Technology, Drama (Theatre Studies), English, French, Geography, German, History, ICT, Italian, Mathematics, Music, Physics, Physical Education, Religious Studies (Theology), Spanish. CACHE meets the entry requirements for early years Primary Teaching and a large number of Primary Education Teacher Training Degrees"

    https://www.careers4u.tv/what-a-levels/
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    What is CACHE??


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    Can it be taken as an A level??


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    Cache isn't an a level. Its a level 3 - so same level as a-level but you can only do one as it counts for 3 a levels. I am currently doing a cache level 3 in childrens and young persons workforce. Its theory and practical based and no exams just coursework. . Its 5 days a week.
    Not sure if it is as good as a level in the eyes of universities .. depends on if they want previos experience I guess.
    Not very helpful sorry ! Im doing this course while trying to figure out what my next steps can be lol ! Because I had no intention to going to uni when I started. It says can progress on to related degrees so I guess ones based on teaching. Worth a look if nothing else. It also gives out 420 ucas points for getting a* .. down to 240 for a c.
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    Thanks for the help!


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