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    People have been talking about the EU a lot. I sometimes think that maybe people weren't prepared for the EU and politicians should have done more to help average Joe understand what the EU was about.

    There wasn't enough time for member countries to build infrastructure to deal with some of problems associated with the freedom of movements for workers among the member countries.

    For example, if an EU person becomes unemployed, all right there are already some rules in place, do people in the UK have to support him financially? Or should the country of his origin?

    I understand that in the 21st century people move to wherever they want to go and there is some validity in the argument that the mass immigration can be explained by globalisation. People want to move, but there is no infrastructure to support that.
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    The focus should be on building up other EU nations' infrastructures such that people aren't induced into mass immigration; you can't blame the individuals, after all, for wanting to improve their lives and exploit a system that lets them.

    Sadly with the current crisis in the Eurozone, Brussels/Germany is keen on inflicting pain and suffering on the peoples of Greece, Cyprus, wherever next, and only motivating them further to jump ship and move somewhere else. But keeping the Euro is a political goal for Brussels and no amount of economic hardship will be allowed to stand in the way of that, it seems.

    Here's a comparison of the GDP growth rate of Iceland (which let the banks go bust, had a mini-revolution, and got going again) and various EU countries, thanks to some nifty maths from Google.
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    (Original post by tc92)
    The focus should be on building up other EU nations' infrastructures such that people aren't induced into mass immigration; you can't blame the individuals, after all, for wanting to improve their lives and exploit a system that lets them.

    Sadly with the current crisis in the Eurozone, Brussels/Germany is keen on inflicting pain and suffering on the peoples of Greece, Cyprus, wherever next, and only motivating them further to jump ship and move somewhere else. But keeping the Euro is a political goal for Brussels and no amount of economic hardship will be allowed to stand in the way of that, it seems.

    Here's a comparison of the GDP growth rate of Iceland (which let the banks go bust, had a mini-revolution, and got going again) and various EU countries, thanks to some nifty maths from Google.
    Absolutely, you can't blame them for taking advantage. I think a Union between northern European countries could have worked - these countries already had similarly large economies, similar working conditions etc.

    The issue is that the Union is too large - 27 MS, where in particular the southern European countries are particularly ill-suited to a Union with the northern European countries. Their economies are too different, which is why the 'Project' has been such a disaster for them. I'm not only referring to the PIIGS here either.

    More broadly, the rationale for the free movement of workers is for a shortage of workers to be filled by another MS. In theory this is quite sensible and of obvious benefit. However, where the MS are so disparate in terms of their economies, there is an imbalance. When Romania and Bulgaria have controls lifted on their citizens' movement, many of them may well wish to travel here, but few Brits will want to go there. There is a fundamental imbalance, and so the result is net mass immigration.

    We've moved away from purely filling shortages of workers. Now we have a situation where there are a shortage of low-skilled jobs in this country, with high unemployment, yet we still open our doors to more low-skilled EU citizens. This only makes it more difficult for UK citizens to get such jobs, and also has a depressive effect on wages - the NMW fast becomes a maximum for many low-paid jobs.
 
 
 
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