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Engineering or Medicine: WHICH IS HARDER? Watch

  • View Poll Results: Which is a Harder Degree?
    Engineering
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    Medicine
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    Basically I always get into an argument with people (about engineering being a harder course then medicine), because a lot of people don't seem to understand what level of difficulty, engineering is at. I am Studying Mechanical Engineering so of course, I am biased. But what does TSR think?
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    Medicine
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    Engineering

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    I'm just curious to see whether anyone's done both.
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    Well, they're very different subjects which require different skills. I reckon some will find engineering more difficult than medicine and vise versa.
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    I'd say engineering. I do many modules medics do and they're mostly route learning. Engineering is bloody hard.


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    Medicine has more QUantative topics that will make Engineering look pale in comparison.
    Engineering has Problem Solving Questions that will make Medicine look stupid. Therefore they are Equally hard. TSR should stop have Elitist mindset.
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    They're different in different ways - particularly in the early stages of medicine a lot of the difficulty lies in the vast amount of information that needs to be learnt. Engineering, I imagine, has a lot more that's conceptually difficult. Both involve a lot of problem solving. There's more solid maths/physics in engineering, which will make it easier for those who like things that have a categorically right answer, but those who struggle with maths or enjoy/work well at digging into and discussing problems/questions might find medicine easier. Apples and oranges really. Both are challenging, not much point saying one is more so than another.
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    Engineering is also a broad subject. If you Study Motor Engineering I would guess its easier than if you study some advanced chemical engineering.

    But I don't really know as I've studied neither. Overall I'd say both medicine and Engineering are easy and that you should man up and study a doctorate in physics. (kidding)
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    I think it depends on your skill set: if you're good at complex mathematics and physics, you'll find Engineering easier and if you're good at memorising lots of drug names and facts, you'll find Medicine easier. So overall, it depends on the person.

    In my personal view, I would probably find Engineering more difficult based on the fact that I dropped Maths after AS, so yeah...
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    Engineering. Almost anyone can do medicine, though it's easier to get in for, and less work.
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    I expect that, conceptually, engineering is a lot harder than medicine. I mean I'm sure my brain would melt trying to do the complex calculations expected of engineers! But then the sheer quantity of stuff you have to know in medicine, coupled with the fact it's emotionally demanding and you have to be good at communicating with patients etc. makes medicine pretty difficult too. I guess they're not really comparable; both are hard in their own ways and some people will be more suited to one than the other
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    Okay yeah Medicine has a HUGE work load, but engineering is not that far behind. I mean do you think we just sit in class and do nothing for 25-32 hours a week. Engineering is hard because you have to study a concept, understand it fully, and then apply it to other areas.
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    It depends on what your strengths/ weaknesses are I think. Engineering is probably harder to understand, but Medicine can be quite hard emotionally.
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    Also with engineering you don't have to grasp every single thing to the full extent, while with medicine a lot of concepts (esp. Clinical skills) are essential.
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    (Original post by reubenkinara)
    I'm just curious to see whether anyone's done both.
    Yep. I'm a medic with an intercalated BSc in Engineering. I found them both hard in different ways.
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    What we need is a orthotics and prosthetic engineer as they will have done topics which cross over into both disciplines.

    It really is a matter of varying individual difficulties. My dad was an aeronautical engineer and I cant imagine anything worse or more difficult. He has the same opinion about medicine, whereas I find understanding biological concepts interesting and therefore it comes easy.

    When somebody say's ATP, I will automatically think adenosine triphosphate, whereas he'll think advanced turbo prop. People are different.
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    Depends what you mean by 'harder'. To my mind mechanical engineering is more difficult in some respects e.g. mathematical/technical rigor, but obviously a lower workload, and hence less of a mission, for comparably capable candidates when you factor in course length and placements on a course in medicine..
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    Doesn't take a genius to see which path is harder.... You can be an engineer in 4 years. No one can be a US doctor in less than 8 years, not including residency...
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    (Original post by TboyAllen)
    Doesn't take a genius to see which path is harder.... You can be an engineer in 4 years. No one can be a US doctor in less than 8 years, not including residency...
    It takes a minimum of 8 years (usually 10+) to be a Chartered Engineer.
 
 
 
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