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    I have just chosen my Alevels - at the moment I am doing Biology (because I am good at it), Physics (because i love it) psychology (because it interests me) and history (so i am not all science-y and because i love it and I do well in it. But I am having second thoughts about it because I realize these A levels cut off most Medicine degrees, but I am also worried about if i am academically good enough to do a medical degree and be a good doctor. For my GCSE's I am predicted 1 A*, 7 A's and 3 B's.

    Are these too low to do well in medicine and what would be my best route into medicine if these are good enough?
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    (Original post by augustbaby)
    I have just chosen my Alevels - at the moment I am doing Biology (because I am good at it), Physics (because i love it) psychology (because it interests me) and history (so i am not all science-y and because i love it and I do well in it. But I am having second thoughts about it because I realize these A levels cut off most Medicine degrees, but I am also worried about if i am academically good enough to do a medical degree and be a good doctor. For my GCSE's I am predicted 1 A*, 7 A's and 3 B's.

    Are these too low to do well in medicine and what would be my best route into medicine if these are good enough?
    Lack of chemistry A level is likely to be far more of a hindrance than your GCSEs which are pretty fine.

    How come you're not taking chemitstry?
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    (Original post by augustbaby)
    I have just chosen my Alevels - at the moment I am doing Biology (because I am good at it), Physics (because i love it) psychology (because it interests me) and history (so i am not all science-y and because i love it and I do well in it. But I am having second thoughts about it because I realize these A levels cut off most Medicine degrees, but I am also worried about if i am academically good enough to do a medical degree and be a good doctor. For my GCSE's I am predicted 1 A*, 7 A's and 3 B's.

    Are these too low to do well in medicine and what would be my best route into medicine if these are good enough?
    You need Chemistry. Chemistry is way more important for medicine than biology. If you swapped Physics for Chemistry you'd be absolutely fine academically, if you could get three As at A Level (and I cannot stress how much more advanced A Level is to GCSE - it's a whole new ball game).
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    I decided against Chemistry as I am set to get a high B at GCSE in it and thought that a good Physics would look better than a low chemistry? am I wrong in thinking this?
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    (Original post by augustbaby)
    I decided against Chemistry as I am set to get a high B at GCSE in it and thought that a good Physics would look better than a low chemistry? am I wrong in thinking this?
    Well, yes, an A in A level physics would generally look better than a C in A level chemistry, however, getting into medicine without chemistry A level is certainly trickier. Mostly because it will restrict your options quite a bit since the majority of medical schools expect chemistry at least to AS level.

    Take a look at this page:

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki...l_Requirements

    If you did even just the AS level you'd increase your options quite a bit.
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    (Original post by augustbaby)
    I decided against Chemistry as I am set to get a high B at GCSE in it and thought that a good Physics would look better than a low chemistry? am I wrong in thinking this?
    You're going to need an A in all your A levels (you can get away with a B/C at AS though!) as that's the minimum requirement for most medical schools - the few exceptions have an A*AA requirement.

    I suggest that you have a look here especially and here also.

    I'm afraid that Chemistry is pretty much necessary. The only medical school who will consider you without chemistry is UEA.
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    (Original post by augustbaby)
    I decided against Chemistry as I am set to get a high B at GCSE in it and thought that a good Physics would look better than a low chemistry? am I wrong in thinking this?
    Well you wouldn't meet the requirements for a lot of place...so it wouldn't matter if you look good.

    I would take a minute and reconsider, do you like chemistry? Because there is quite a bit of chemistry in medicine, particularly biochemistry
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    (Original post by augustbaby)
    I decided against Chemistry as I am set to get a high B at GCSE in it and thought that a good Physics would look better than a low chemistry? am I wrong in thinking this?
    You're right in general terms, for most subjects that would be the case. An A in Media Studies looks better than an E in Maths. But Chemistry is the 'essential' subject for Medicine, and the Universities which don't always require it at A2 level always, as far as I am aware, want it at AS.

    http://search.ucas.com/cgi-bin/hsrun...ICINE&single=Y

    Click on some of the courses in the link above, select 'Entry Requirements' and see what they have to say about subject requirements.
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    (Original post by Dannyboy1236)
    Well you wouldn't meet the requirements for a lot of place...so it wouldn't matter if you look good.

    I would take a minute and reconsider, do you like chemistry? Because there is quite a bit of chemistry in medicine, particularly biochemistry
    Er...not really.

    Biochemistry at medical school is an entirely different kettle of fish, the emphasis is very much on the "bio" bit :p:
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    Er...not really.

    Biochemistry at medical school is an entirely different kettle of fish, the emphasis is very much on the "bio" bit :p:
    Oh...well I take it back. That was based purely on what I've heard other people say.
    But surely it is significant?

    Are you doing medicine?
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    Er...not really.

    Biochemistry at medical school is an entirely different kettle of fish, the emphasis is very much on the "bio" bit :p:
    Was just about to say this. In A level, you're focusing on inorganic and organic chemistry, with a bit of physical chemistry thrown in. The only stuff you'll find that's particularly relevant from A level is acid-base and the associated concepts.
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    (Original post by Dannyboy1236)
    Oh...well I take it back. That was based purely on what I've heard other people say.
    But surely it is significant?
    Not really. A levels were quite a while back for me, but from what I remember chemisty involved learning about bond angles, enthalpy changes, something about orbitals (whatever the hell they are :p:), hydrocarbon structures and some other random stuff.

    None of that has anything to do with medicine.

    Medical school biochemistry is more about the properties of proteins, fats, carbohydrates, some basic molecular biology to do with DNA/RNA, different hormones and their actions, how oxygen/carbon dioxide are transported in the body, etc. None of it is pure chemistry.

    Are you doing medicine?
    Yep, and I hated chemistry at school. If medical school had anything to do with pure chemistry I'd never have signed up for it.
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    Not really. A levels were quite a while back for me, but from what I remember chemisty involved learning about bond angles, enthalpy changes, something about orbitals (whatever the hell they are :p:), hydrocarbon structures and some other random stuff.

    None of that has anything to do with medicine.

    Medical school biochemistry is more about the properties of proteins, fats, carbohydrates, some basic molecular biology to do with DNA/RNA, different hormones and their actions, how oxygen/carbon dioxide are transported in the body, etc. None of it is pure chemistry.



    Yep, and I hated chemistry at school. If medical school had anything to do with pure chemistry I'd never have signed up for it.
    You've just made medicine even more appealing then it was, thank you.

    And if you don't mind me asking what year are you in and which university?
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    (Original post by Dannyboy1236)
    You've just made medicine even more appealing then it was, thank you.
    It's what we're here for

    Chemistry A level is really just another hoop to jump through in the admissions process - a bit like the UKCAT or whatever.

    I shall PM you.
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    (Original post by Dannyboy1236)
    Oh...well I take it back. That was based purely on what I've heard other people say.
    But surely it is significant?

    Are you doing medicine?

    (Original post by Hype en Ecosse)
    Was just about to say this. In A level, you're focusing on inorganic and organic chemistry, with a bit of physical chemistry thrown in. The only stuff you'll find that's particularly relevant from A level is acid-base and the associated concepts.
    Regardless of this, I don't think we should detract from the fact that without Chemistry it is going to be incredibly difficult to get into medicine. The Med Schools still want medicine even though you say a lot of it doesn't relate to medicine. It is already hard enough to get an offer, why should the OP make this any harder by severely restricting where they can apply?

    (Original post by augustbaby)
    I have just chosen my Alevels - at the moment I am doing Biology (because I am good at it), Physics (because i love it) psychology (because it interests me) and history (so i am not all science-y and because i love it and I do well in it. But I am having second thoughts about it because I realize these A levels cut off most Medicine degrees, but I am also worried about if i am academically good enough to do a medical degree and be a good doctor. For my GCSE's I am predicted 1 A*, 7 A's and 3 B's.

    Are these too low to do well in medicine and what would be my best route into medicine if these are good enough?


    I would urge you to battle through AS Chemistry at least OP, I had GCSE's similar to yours (2A*,7A,2B) and am on for AAAA/AAAB now. You meet their minimum requirements at GCSE so don't worry, just avoid Oxbridge and Birmingham. As long as you're willing to work hard there's no reason why you can't make a very good doctor! But once again, I cannot stress enough the importance of Chemistry. Besides, a good UKCAT could make up for "poor" GCSE grades.
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    (Original post by augustbaby)
    I decided against Chemistry as I am set to get a high B at GCSE in it and thought that a good Physics would look better than a low chemistry? am I wrong in thinking this?
    Physics is a good indicator of academic ability, however don't underestimate it, physics is very hard at A2. An A is attainable but you really need to have a deep understanding of the subject.

    Chemistry would be a better choice for medicine as UEA is the only university that doesn't need Chemistry for the standard 5 year medicine course.

    5 Year A100 (Standard Entry) Link
    There is only 1 university that doesn't require chemistry at all.
    UEA

    There are 9 universities that require chemistry to at least AS level, most of these require 2 sciences though with biology to A2.

    The rest need A2 chemistry, AS biology and some require A2 biology.

    6 Year A104/A106 (Foundation Entry) Link
    Most of these courses do not allow the applicant to have any science subjects. However these are mostly more competitive than the standard course as there are far less places available.

    Some have special entry requirements concerning household income and parental education etc.

    4 Year A101 (Graduate Entry) Link
    Do a degree, get a 2i (there are a few options with a 2ii), and then apply to the GEP/GEM universities. These courses are very very competitive, often require relevant degrees, have limited funding and don't allow for the student to intercalate in their degree.
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    I enjoy chemistry, a lot, but I do struggle with some of it. So if I did Chemistry AS and the four A levels above would that give me more options?
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    (Original post by augustbaby)
    I enjoy chemistry, a lot, but I do struggle with some of it. So if I did Chemistry AS and the four A levels above would that give me more options?
    I wouldn't advise doing 4 A levels - particularly if you struggle with chemistry, no point jeapardising your chemistry grade by spreading yourself too thin. No unis give extra credit for more than 3 A levels, except maybe Barts who I think decide to interview on UCAS points. So do the chemistry AS and if it goes well continue to A2 and then you will have maximised the courses you can apply to.
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    (Original post by HCubed)
    I wouldn't advise doing 4 A levels - particularly if you struggle with chemistry, no point jeapardising your chemistry grade by spreading yourself too thin. No unis give extra credit for more than 3 A levels, except maybe Barts who I think decide to interview on UCAS points. So do the chemistry AS and if it goes well continue to A2 and then you will have maximised the courses you can apply to.

    So would you recommend doing Chemistry instead of which subject?
 
 
 
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