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University of East London - BSc Physiotherapy Student Blog - 1st Year Watch

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    -- About me --

    NOTE: I DO NOT START UNTIL THE 16th SEPTEMBER 2013! HOWEVER PLEASE FEEL FREE TO WATCH THE THREAD IF YOU ARE INTERESTED SO YOU CAN KEEP UP-TO-DATE WHEN I START!

    Moderators please DO NOT merge this thread, you may move it to a different section, however please do inform me if you do!

    Welcome everyone,

    Let me start by introducing myself and giving some information about my background. My name is Aaron; I am 21 years old and due to start BSc Physiotherapy at the University of East London on the 16th September 2013. Before applying to Physiotherapy, I was a Fitness Professional for 3 years with the qualifications/training listed below, I have also linked each course I did incase anyone is interested.


    After I finished my qualification in Sports Massage Therapy I decided I wanted to pursue Physiotherapy after a long chat with my massage tutor and a Physiotherapist who was also doing the sports massage course with me. From here I booked a course with the Distance Learning Centre where I choose to do the Physiotherapy Pathway studying Biology, Advanced Human Biology, Biological Health & Disease and Physics.


    -- University & Module Information --

    So, as you may of guessed I will be studying at the University of East London at BSc level, I will be a 1st year and this is my first degree... so it should be interesting. I haven't seen anyone post a Physiotherapy student blog in a long time, so now I think its time I get the ball rolling so to speak!

    Everyone I have ever spoken to about Physiotherapy at UEL has never given any real details about their experience, I have searched the web top to bottom and have yet to find any information about the course, its quality and general experiences. Thus, I will be creating a blog to inform everyone about Physiotherapy at UEL, its accommodation, the city of London in general and anything else I may find relevant!

    My Modules for the first year are listed below:
    • Foundations to Practice
    • Human Body – Locomotor 1
    • Applied Healthcare Science 1
    • Applied Healthcare Science 2
    • Human Body – Locomotor 2
    • Work Integrated Learning 1

    If you wish to ask for any information regarding UEL once I start please feel free. If you wish to ask any questions about myself, advice about getting into Physiotherapy (what I did) or any details about Physiotherapy at UEL again, please feel free.

    Regards,
    $hadow (Aaron).
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    UPDATE 1: ENTRY AND ADMISSIONS PROCESS.


    As not much is known about UEL's admissions process for Physiotherapy; especially on this forum due to it changing in recent years I thought it would be informative for prospective students to know a little about the processes you will go through.

    My admissions day at UEL was, for me placed into three stages:


    Stage 1, Application stage (UCAS)

    Summit personal statement and grades as normal.


    Stage 2, Numeracy and Literacy Test

    Regardless of what GCSE grades you have, UEL will always invite you for a Numeracy and Literacy Test. I had A Level students in my class with A in Maths and English but they were not exempt. The Maths test was basic, it contained: addition, subtraction, division, multiplication and metric conversions relating to drugs & medication, I got a `D` in GCSE Maths and did not revise for this test, so its not complicated stuff; the Maths test lasts for about 30 minutes.

    The English test is slightly more unorthodox; they provide you with a case study of a patient and ask you to find and note the spelling, grammar and punctuation mistakes in the text; there were about 20 lines to go through in about 30 minutes; again I got a `E` in GCSE English, so it isn't too hard.


    Stage 3, Group Interviews

    You only reach this stage if you pass the English and Maths test sat in stage 2. This stage generally goes in four phases: Q&A, Introduction, Group task & Offer. They normally get back to you within a week after your tests.

    The Q&A phase, was quite simple. All the prospective students were gathered in a room with second year Physiotherapy students and you are given the opportunity to ask the students anything you wish relating to the course or the University. This is not formally assessed... however the Physiotherapy students do take part in the later stages of the interview so it is advised to be sensible and professional at all times. This time is also for you to interact with different prospective students, which is always fun.

    The Introduction phase, this is essentially when the formal interviewing begins... you are placed into groups of 8 and asked 3 questions. 1) Your name and where you live, 2) What previous qualifications/experience you have, 3) Why Physiotherapy. The admissions tutors will often ask you later about what you have said, so please do remember and don't make things up. Additionally the admissions tutors will generally start conversations with the group with regards to what some people say, they might even ask you individualised questions so be on the ball.

    The Group task, this is where I was very thrown... I had never done anything like this before, and its almost impossible to prepare for. The group phase is where the admission tutors give you a metaphorical scenario relating to Physiotherapy; where your group must discuss how you would metaphorically present or plan for a presentation or something similar. Here they are looking for teamwork, contribution, leadership skills, initiative and they are also testing your knowledge of the profession with the ideas you present.

    The Offer stage, this comes after the Group task phase if you are successful and they normally get back to you within a month.
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    UPDATE 2: BOOKS & OPEN DAY AT STRATFORD

    A year before applying for Physiotherapy and whilst I actually was applying I stalked TSR forums continually looking for advice about what the best books for the course were, yeah, I know what you are thinking, I was very keen... lol. I think I must have bugged `Ironmike` and a couple of the other qualified Physiotherapists like 10 times.


    BOOKS:

    So, after going to numerous libraries and checking 20-50 of the most highly recommended books, I finally got all my books and would like to share them with you covering what they contain and the strengths and weaknesses. I bought 5 books (Plus 1 more - The Physiotherapist's Pocketbook: Essential Facts at Your Fingertips, but I have not got this yet, so cannot review it.), plus I will be using 3 books from my own collection to brush up on my own palpation and Soft Tissue Manipulation (Massage techniques, frictions, vibrations. trigger pointing, shaking, myofascial release, positional release and MET's), I'm not reviewing these 3 books though.

    I would like to add, Physiotherapy students are provided with 1 book per a module for free, SO DO NOT RUSH OUT AND BUY BOOKS UNLESS YOU HAVE DONE YOUR OWN RESEARCH! I brought my books because I did my research and I feel as I learn from these books easily, like how they are presented and know they can be used throughout my ideal career path.


    1) Clinical Oriented Anatomy by Keith L Moore:

    This book as the name suggests is all about Clinical Anatomy. Clinical anatomy is anatomy that is the most relevant to the practice of Medicine, this book is placed into regional anatomy (regional parts of the body) format and covers Thorax, Abdomen, Pelvis and Perineum, Back, Lower Limb, Upper Limb, Head and Neck.

    Pros: Extremely detailed when it comes to all aspects of Clinical anatomy, while being easy to read if you understand the basics. Its colour coordinated per region so its easy to find things, it is referenced really well so it will make a great core text for essays and other assignments, the pictures are well illustrated and easy to learn from. It also contains limited Pathophysiology and clinical notes for important points which is a bonus.

    Cons: Very bulky and quite heavy, you wouldn't want to be carrying it around as a quick reference text, this is core text. Quite pricey too, but thats not an issue if you borrow one from your library.


    2) Fundamentals of Anatomy and Physiology by Frederic H. Martini:

    The book is based on Systematic anatomy & physiology, which is the study of anatomy & physiology by biological systems, like Skeletal system, Muscular system, Circulatory system. This book is in my opinion the best Systematic anatomy & physiology out there at the moment.

    Pros: In comparison to `Clinical Oriented Anatomy` this book is simplistic to understand but highly useful; you can literally just read it and all the information should stay in your head. Systematic anatomy & physiology is often the way most people start to learn anatomy & physiology as it is the easist way to learn (Its how I learnt through all my courses and even now partly) before moving on to clinical and regional formats. This book is also colour coordinated, making it easy to find systems with practice, its highly detailed for a systematic anatomy book, one of the most detailed I have ever seen, it also comes with a DVD that really complicates the book going into good depth and breadth, also it comes with a Student Access Card and separate Atlas of the Human body book covering real cadaver (dead bodies) illustrations for detailed reference and views.

    Cons: Again this book is bulky and moderately heavy, the book does lack clinical depth when it comes to Clinical Anatomy, and does not cover Pathophysiology very much or even at all, cannot be used for quick reference. The book is also pricey


    3) Clinical Sports Medicine by Brukner & Khan's:

    This book is purely about Musculoskeletal treatment of clinical sports injuries, from fundamental principles of recovery, nutrition, diagnosis, rehabilitation regional problems, special groups (young people), management of medical issues (acute, ect.), practical aspects of sports medicine such as assessment protocol and special tests.

    Pros: This book is just absolutely fantastic with it comes to all aspects of Musculoskeletal treatment, it covers everything you would possibly need from assessment all the way through to treatment, whilst providing the theory along the way. It is HIGHLY referenced in text so definitely useful for a reference text, it is placed into related sections with colour coding so things are generally easy to find, the books detail and illustrations are superb, it covers biomechanics which is sport specific, but can also be used for general sportsmen, provides lots of information regarding complementary treatments and has lots of physiology and anatomy relating to sports pathology. Additionally it comes with an online student guide, always nice...

    Cons: This book has 1296 pages... it is by far the biggest and heaviest book I have, which is a shame as if this book was pocket size it would be fantastic, in the pros section I stated the detail and illustrations are superb, however there are some that are so detailed that they are almost impossible to practice unless you know; not only what the terms mean, but how to perform many palpatory and manipulative techniques as there is no real step by step guide which is a shame. This book does expect you know quite a bit about rehabilitation, anatomy and physiology and the principles of each, I do struggle you understand particular assessment protocols and how to perform them, and I do spend a great proportion of my time looking up words I have never seen before; but thats a pro too as personally I'm always learning from this book. HOWEVER, the book is extremely pricey, I would recommend borrowing one from the library.


    4) Trail Guide to the Body by Andrew Biel:

    This book in my opinion is essential for learning surface anatomy and palpation, learning how to locate bony landmarks, ligaments, tendons, muscles, nerves and blood supply.

    Pros: Trail Guide to the Body takes you step by step how to find structures of the body, be that bony landmarks, ligaments, tendons, muscles, nerves, arteries and veins! Its incredibly detailed when it comes to its illustrations, the text has sufficient information which is so easy to understand, the book teaches you how to palpate, what you should be looking for, how to identify structures using tests and simple touch.

    Cons: The edition I have (3rd) is one behind the newest (4th) and thus it does not cover all the muscles in the body, which is slightly annoying. This book does not cover physiology at all, so you will need a separate text to use if you buy this purely for anatomy, it is not colour coded, so it is slightly annoying having to go back to the context page repeatedly to find what you wish, however it is placed into regional anatomy format so its not too bad. However you will NEED a partner for you to practice finding many of the landmarks of the body, and thus it can be hard to practice by yourself. The book is also slightly pricey.


    5) Clinical Medicine by Kumar & Clark:

    This book is purely based on Medical physiology and pathophysiology, it lists the most common ailments all the way through to the least common ailments known to Medicine, covering fundamentals of human genetics and cellular biology while illustrating how the body should function and system specific anatomy and physiology.

    Pros: This is in my opinion the best medical physiology and pathophysiology book on the market, its detail is unbelievable, both in text and illustrations, it goes into a cellular depth all the way up to the structures and organs of all the systems in the human body. It literally covers the most common ailments all the way through to the least common ailments know to Medicine. It covers law in healthcare and medical environments, teaches you how to recognise and then diagnose from `red flags`, it teaches you about normal functioning levels of important nutrition and its implications if normal levels are not kept. Its truly a well detailed book and invaluable for learning about disease relating to all systems of the body and additionally an excellent reference. Its also colour coded.

    Cons: The detail in the book is so great, it does take some time to learn the chemistry and phrases involved in certain aspects of this book, the book is also the second biggest book I have, so it is very heavy and very big, you would need a bag to carry it. You will be spending a lot of time looking up particular things the book expects you to know, like chemical structures, medical terminology etc. The book sometimes does go a bit too in depth in certain topics, especially for Physiotherapy, so it is easy to get lost in reading, but the content is great.


    Stratford Open Day:

    I went to the stratford open day on the 22d of June 2013 where there was a lecture about Physiotherapy and Podiatry combined, the lecture did provide some useful information that I did not know so I am thankful I attended. I will not be covering anything relating to Podiatry, as to be quite honest I turned off when the Podiatry information was presented.


    Placement information & Useful information

    UEL has 32-36 contracted placements available every year for student placements, thus the Cohort of UEL is between 32-36. Placements in the first year are generally kept close to the University for added support and ease of traveling for the tutors to visit you and for the students, to ease them into placements. The second year students will go out further, even out of London, but the third year students may go as far as Birmingham for private clinics contacted to UEL.

    This brings me to my next point, because UEL is not contacted to the NHS and students are paying their course fees, UEL can and does include private Physiotherapy clinics for its placements! Students also get the opportunity to do an elective placement, where you can go anywhere you wish, even abroad ... if you organise it!

    Students get uniforms provided free of change, and you will also get travel money for placements reimbursed, as well as accommodation money to an acceptable limit.
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    :bumps: Thanks Aaron! You'e my hero! I'll have the interview on 6th of August. The information you've given is sooooo helpful.
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    (Original post by $hadow)
    UPDATE 2: BOOKS & OPEN DAY AT STRATFORD

    A year before applying for Physiotherapy and whilst I actually was applying I stalked TSR forums continually looking for advice about what the best books for the course were, yeah, I know what you are thinking, I was very keen... lol. I think I must have bugged `Ironmike` and a couple of the other qualified Physiotherapists like 10 times.


    BOOKS:

    So, after going to numerous libraries and checking 20-50 of the most highly recommended books, I finally got all my books and would like to share them with you covering what they contain and the strengths and weaknesses. I bought 5 books (Plus 1 more - The Physiotherapist's Pocketbook: Essential Facts at Your Fingertips, but I have not got this yet, so cannot review it.), plus I will be using 3 books from my own collection to brush up on my own palpation and Soft Tissue Manipulation (Massage techniques, frictions, vibrations. trigger pointing, shaking, myofascial release, positional release and MET's), I'm not reviewing these 3 books though.

    I would like to add, Physiotherapy students are provided with 1 book per a module for free, SO DO NOT RUSH OUT AND BUY BOOKS UNLESS YOU HAVE DONE YOUR OWN RESEARCH! I brought my books because I did my research and I feel as I learn from these books easily, like how they are presented and know they can be used throughout my ideal career path.


    1) Clinical Oriented Anatomy by Keith L Moore:

    This book as the name suggests is all about Clinical Anatomy. Clinical anatomy is anatomy that is the most relevant to the practice of Medicine, this book is placed into regional anatomy (regional parts of the body) format and covers Thorax, Abdomen, Pelvis and Perineum, Back, Lower Limb, Upper Limb, Head and Neck.

    Pros: Extremely detailed when it comes to all aspects of Clinical anatomy, while being easy to read if you understand the basics. Its colour coordinated per region so its easy to find things, it is referenced really well so it will make a great core text for essays and other assignments, the pictures are well illustrated and easy to learn from. It also contains limited Pathophysiology and clinical notes for important points which is a bonus.

    Cons: Very bulky and quite heavy, you wouldn't want to be carrying it around as a quick reference text, this is core text. Quite pricey too, but thats not an issue if you borrow one from your library.


    2) Fundamentals of Anatomy and Physiology by Frederic H. Martini:

    The book is based on Systematic anatomy & physiology, which is the study of anatomy & physiology by biological systems, like Skeletal system, Muscular system, Circulatory system. This book is in my opinion the best Systematic anatomy & physiology out there at the moment.

    Pros: In comparison to `Clinical Oriented Anatomy` this book is simplistic to understand but highly useful; you can literally just read it and all the information should stay in your head. Systematic anatomy & physiology is often the way most people start to learn anatomy & physiology as it is the easist way to learn (Its how I learnt through all my courses and even now partly) before moving on to clinical and regional formats. This book is also colour coordinated, making it easy to find systems with practice, its highly detailed for a systematic anatomy book, one of the most detailed I have ever seen, it also comes with a DVD that really complicates the book going into good depth and breadth, also it comes with a Student Access Card and separate Atlas of the Human body book covering real cadaver (dead bodies) illustrations for detailed reference and views.

    Cons: Again this book is bulky and moderately heavy, the book does lack clinical depth when it comes to Clinical Anatomy, and does not cover Pathophysiology very much or even at all, cannot be used for quick reference. The book is also pricey


    3) Clinical Sports Medicine by Brukner & Khan's:

    This book is purely about Musculoskeletal treatment of clinical sports injuries, from fundamental principles of recovery, nutrition, diagnosis, rehabilitation regional problems, special groups (young people), management of medical issues (acute, ect.), practical aspects of sports medicine such as assessment protocol and special tests.

    Pros: This book is just absolutely fantastic with it comes to all aspects of Musculoskeletal treatment, it covers everything you would possibly need from assessment all the way through to treatment, whilst providing the theory along the way. It is HIGHLY referenced in text so definitely useful for a reference text, it is placed into related sections with colour coding so things are generally easy to find, the books detail and illustrations are superb, it covers biomechanics which is sport specific, but can also be used for general sportsmen, provides lots of information regarding complementary treatments and has lots of physiology and anatomy relating to sports pathology. Additionally it comes with an online student guide, always nice...

    Cons: This book has 1296 pages... it is by far the biggest and heaviest book I have, which is a shame as if this book was pocket size it would be fantastic, in the pros section I stated the detail and illustrations are superb, however there are some that are so detailed that they are almost impossible to practice unless you know; not only what the terms mean, but how to perform many palpatory and manipulative techniques as there is no real step by step guide which is a shame. This book does expect you know quite a bit about rehabilitation, anatomy and physiology and the principles of each, I do struggle you understand particular assessment protocols and how to perform them, and I do spend a great proportion of my time looking up words I have never seen before; but thats a pro too as personally I'm always learning from this book. HOWEVER, the book is extremely pricey, I would recommend borrowing one from the library.


    4) Trail Guide to the Body by Andrew Biel:

    This book in my opinion is essential for learning surface anatomy and palpation, learning how to locate bony landmarks, ligaments, tendons, muscles, nerves and blood supply.

    Pros: Trail Guide to the Body takes you step by step how to find structures of the body, be that bony landmarks, ligaments, tendons, muscles, nerves, arteries and veins! Its incredibly detailed when it comes to its illustrations, the text has sufficient information which is so easy to understand, the book teaches you how to palpate, what you should be looking for, how to identify structures using tests and simple touch.

    Cons: The edition I have (3rd) is one behind the newest (4th) and thus it does not cover all the muscles in the body, which is slightly annoying. This book does not cover physiology at all, so you will need a separate text to use if you buy this purely for anatomy, it is not colour coded, so it is slightly annoying having to go back to the context page repeatedly to find what you wish, however it is placed into regional anatomy format so its not too bad. However you will NEED a partner for you to practice finding many of the landmarks of the body, and thus it can be hard to practice by yourself. The book is also slightly pricey.


    5) Clinical Medicine by Kumar & Clark:

    This book is purely based on Medical physiology and pathophysiology, it lists the most common ailments all the way through to the least common ailments known to Medicine, covering fundamentals of human genetics and cellular biology while illustrating how the body should function and system specific anatomy and physiology.

    Pros: This is in my opinion the best medical physiology and pathophysiology book on the market, its detail is unbelievable, both in text and illustrations, it goes into a cellular depth all the way up to the structures and organs of all the systems in the human body. It literally covers the most common ailments all the way through to the least common ailments know to Medicine. It covers law in healthcare and medical environments, teaches you how to recognise and then diagnose from `red flags`, it teaches you about normal functioning levels of important nutrition and its implications if normal levels are not kept. Its truly a well detailed book and invaluable for learning about disease relating to all systems of the body and additionally an excellent reference. Its also colour coded.

    Cons: The detail in the book is so great, it does take some time to learn the chemistry and phrases involved in certain aspects of this book, the book is also the second biggest book I have, so it is very heavy and very big, you would need a bag to carry it. You will be spending a lot of time looking up particular things the book expects you to know, like chemical structures, medical terminology etc. The book sometimes does go a bit too in depth in certain topics, especially for Physiotherapy, so it is easy to get lost in reading, but the content is great.


    Stratford Open Day:

    I went to the stratford open day on the 22d of June 2013 where there was a lecture about Physiotherapy and Podiatry combined, the lecture did provide some useful information that I did not know so I am thankful I attended. I will not be covering anything relating to Podiatry, as to be quite honest I turned off when the Podiatry information was presented.


    Placement information & Useful information

    UEL has 32-36 contracted placements available every year for student placements, thus the Cohort of UEL is between 32-36. Placements in the first year are generally kept close to the University for added support and ease of traveling for the tutors to visit you and for the students, to ease them into placements. The second year students will go out further, even out of London, but the third year students may go as far as Birmingham for private clinics contacted to UEL.

    This brings me to my next point, because UEL is not contacted to the NHS and students are paying their course fees, UEL can and does include private Physiotherapy clinics for its placements! Students also get the opportunity to do an elective placement, where you can go anywhere you wish, even abroad ... if you organise it!

    Students get uniforms provided free of change, and you will also get travel money for placements reimbursed, as well as accommodation money to an acceptable limit.

    :bumps:Thanks Aaron! You'e my hero! I'll have the interview on 6th of August. The information you've given is sooooo helpful.
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    (Original post by AGGI1111)
    :bumps:Thanks Aaron! You'e my hero! I'll have the interview on 6th of August. The information you've given is sooooo helpful.
    You're welcome. Good luck with your interview and let me know how you get on!
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    I definitely will let you know! Is there any written exam during interview?

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    (Original post by AGGI1111)
    I definitely will let you know! Is there any written exam during interview?

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    There is no written exams after the math/english tests.
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    UPDATE 3: The dreaded "Pre-course Reading"

    So, this week I was given my pre-course reading to do, a month before we officially start; I am slightly disappointed that we didn't get this reading slightly earlier but oh well I guess.

    I thought this might be useful for new students to know early, as you guys will have more time to prepare or at least more time than I do! When you first start at UEL's BSc Physiotherapy programme you are expected to do 5 tasks; all of which you are expected to finish or know before you actually start.

    Below I have listed the pre-course reading/tasks BSc Physiotherapy students are expected to complete; so if there are any physiotherapy hopefuls out there that wish to go to UEL or that will be attending, you may want to start this ASAP!




    • An introduction to the understanding of the communication and interpersonal skills needed to work in health. Have a look at the sections on - forms of communication, barriers to communication and be able to communicate effectively. Ignore the assessment and there is no need to do the activities as you will explore these in seminars.

      Recommended reading: Unit 1 - Communication in Health and Social Care.pdf


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    I did the interview and got a conditional offer for 2014 entry because I'm a overseas student, got to pass some sort of English exam. Thanks for all your help. Best of luck for your new beginnings.
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    (Original post by AGGI1111)
    I did the interview and got a conditional offer for 2014 entry because I'm a overseas student, got to pass some sort of English exam. Thanks for all your help. Best of luck for your new beginnings.
    Congratulations! Glad I could help.


    UPDATE 3: FRESHERS & INDUCTION WEEK

    So this week marks the end of Fresher's week and Induction week. Induction week was literally the time where physiotherapy students get to meet, get their uniforms fitted, go through occupational health and get introduced to their personal tutors and modules leaders. It was fairly straight forward with regards what was expected of you; half of my class was EXTREMELY hang over or tried including myself... Lucky for us they only expected you listen and be quite.

    This brings us to fresher's week... there was several events at fresher's week and they were "ok" however, if I can recommended one thing for fresher's week its - GO TO HOUSE PARTIES. There are so many house parties around - Mainly on east wing, that it is ridiculous!!! People normally just leave their doors open and you can go in and do whatever you want, dance, drink and its a great place to meet new people too; I would highly recommend it. So yes, I would recommend anyone looking to party to get a flat in east wing... if you are not looking to party I would get one in west wing; though ether way you can always walk over and join in so its no big deal. P.S Drinks are dirt cheap on campus and events respectively!!

    If you wanna ask anything else; just let me know.
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    -- Update 4 - Weeks 2, 3 and 4 --

    Apologies for the the late repły for this thread, it's been a crazy three weeks... Reading through the Ironmike's blogs I can see how busy people get in a physiotherapy degree.

    Weeks 2, 3 and 4 we started our main modules: foundations to practice, locomotive (anatomy) and applied healthcare sciences (physiology). We are in Monday to Thursday with varying times, some days from 9-5 and others from 9-1/3... Lots and lots of work basically. We are expected to do a ton of Independent reading, 60-70 pages a week generally.

    Foundations to practice is based on clinical communication to patient centred practice, basically a holistic approach. Useful for basic psychology application, which is always fun to try on different people! Can be a little tedious at times, but it's required. If you want more information about this module, please PM me.

    Locomotive is basically our anatomy module, we are currently starting with the lower limb, ankle first then leg, knee and thigh and hip. Currently we are half way through the ankle and leg, bones, muscles and ligaments with assessment techniques for particular pathology. We have also started basic massage for these areas too with clinical positioning with regards to the plinth. It's really great fun actually, it's hard work and a lot to learn though and the most enjoyable part of the course.

    Applied healthcare science is our physiology module, currently we are studying immunology and the lymphatic system. This is by far the hardest and toughest module we have, most of our reading is based around this module for sure... To say its a pain in the ass would be a major understatement. We are basically learning the physiology of cells and tissues with things relating to the human in body and it's pathways and responses to injury and disease.


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    What course code did you use for physio at UEL on the ucas application page as I cant find it anywhere not even on their website!
    Thanks
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    (Original post by janderton2)
    What course code did you use for physio at UEL on the ucas application page as I cant find it anywhere not even on their website!
    Thanks
    UEL are no longer on UCAS they do private applications via their website.




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    Update:

    I am no longer keeping this thread up to date, due to the heavy workload, and busy social life. If you wish to ask any questions regarding physiotherapy or UEL, Please PM me.
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    So for entry they don't give you one on one interviews?
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    (Original post by Sarah.B14)
    So for entry they don't give you one on one interviews?
    They do not, group interviews only. If you are late in applying, they may however give you a phone interview.
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    Hi does anyone know about Essex university bsc physiotherapy course literacy and numeracy Exam please please I need some help
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    (Original post by ritu1)
    Hi does anyone know about Essex university bsc physiotherapy course literacy and numeracy Exam please please I need some help
    I have sat this exam too, about two years ago.

    It's basic maths and English testing, spelling, punctuation, grammar, adding, taking away, multiplying and dividing.


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    Oh great thank u sooooo much. If it is same then I m not worried.....
 
 
 
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    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

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