Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

How to best help a child with aspergers? Watch

    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    I've recently started working at an after school club.
    The CRB came back fine etc.
    But I've had n training and I've spent a lot of the time with one boy in particular, he's in year 6, and recently did badly in his sats (though he is bright!)

    He doesn't like other children, finds it difficult if they're near him, judges them quickly and forever.

    But I want to try and help him as best I can. Since I've started at the after school club he's felt a lot safer. I'm the only male on the staff.

    Any tips or good websites or forums someone could recommend me?
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    http://www.aspergernauts.co.uk/forum/ is a good one.

    I support several adults who have aspergers, I have no experience in working with children who have aspergers but I do find that forum useful
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    (Original post by Mel1215)
    http://www.aspergernauts.co.uk/forum/ is a good one.

    I support several adults who have aspergers, I have no experience in working with children who have aspergers but I do find that forum useful
    Is there a general trend of them being able to fit into society or not?
    I've never met or seen an adult with aspergers (I mean, knowingly).

    Thanks for the link!
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I've recently started working at an after school club.
    The CRB came back fine etc.
    But I've had n training and I've spent a lot of the time with one boy in particular, he's in year 6, and recently did badly in his sats (though he is bright!)

    He doesn't like other children, finds it difficult if they're near him, judges them quickly and forever.

    But I want to try and help him as best I can. Since I've started at the after school club he's felt a lot safer. I'm the only male on the staff.

    Any tips or good websites or forums someone could recommend me?
    Hello,

    I am no expert, but had come over a couple of things, although every Autistic person is different, thus it is quite impossible to give you real advice. (By the way, do you know, that he is autistic? It isn't that easy to diagnose.)

    I would recommand to make up your own mind, get to talk to the parents/other teachers/etc. to get more detailed information about the boy and also try to get some books. The Internet is full of simplifications and it is really difficult to get reliable information about the condition, especially covering all the aspects and not just the experience of this autist. (I can't recommand something in particular, as I read the stuff mainly in my mothertongue.)

    The BBC is allways a good way to start, too. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FeGaffIJvHM and http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/0/21700034
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    (Original post by Nathanielle)
    Hello,

    I am no expert, but had come over a couple of things, although every Autistic person is different, thus it is quite impossible to give you real advice. (By the way, do you know, that he is autistic? It isn't that easy to diagnose.)

    I would recommand to make up your own mind, get to talk to the parents/other teachers/etc. to get more detailed information about the boy and also try to get some books. The Internet is full of simplifications and it is really difficult to get reliable information about the condition, especially covering all the aspects and not just the experience of this autist. (I can't recommand something in particular, as I read the stuff mainly in my mothertongue.)

    The BBC is allways a good way to start, too. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FeGaffIJvHM and http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/0/21700034
    Oh I know he's an individual! But no-one at the after school club seems to have much experience with children with aspergers. I was under the impression that all people with aspergers also had autism, is that incorrect? But he's beeen for tests that have come back saying he has aspergers.

    What sort of books do you mean?
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Oh I know he's an individual! But no-one at the after school club seems to have much experience with children with aspergers. I was under the impression that all people with aspergers also had autism, is that incorrect? But he's beeen for tests that have come back saying he has aspergers.

    What sort of books do you mean?
    Autism is the umbrella term and often you speak also of autistic spectrum. Aspergers is just a special form of autism.

    I mean books written for professionals/scientists. Not self help books or books over experiences, but really books who list the symptoms, explain the backgrounds and the current knowledge, but in a neutral scientific way, so that you are not driven in one direction and really just get informed. I am afraid I know none in English, but maybe you could ask either a psychologist (they know, which ones are as easily readible for non-psychologists), go to a specialised library or ...

    Anyway dealing with an Autistic student is work and it might take some time, until you really understand how the condition affects him and what exactly helps him.
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    (Original post by Nathanielle)
    Autism is the umbrella term and often you speak also of autistic spectrum. Aspergers is just a special form of autism.

    I mean books written for professionals/scientists. Not self help books or books over experiences, but really books who list the symptoms, explain the backgrounds and the current knowledge, but in a neutral scientific way, so that you are not driven in one direction and really just get informed. I am afraid I know none in English, but maybe you could ask either a psychologist (they know, which ones are as easily readible for non-psychologists), go to a specialised library or ...

    Anyway dealing with an Autistic student is work and it might take some time, until you really understand how the condition affects him and what exactly helps him.
    Well already he's said to me that he's enjoying the club a lot more now and feels safer, which is fantastic!
    But he spends so much of his time doing, well, nothing. I want him to be able to occupy himself with something fruitful, something that will give him a reward, or something to feel proud of, something that will leave him feeling happy!
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    ...
    But he spends so much of his time doing, well, nothing. I want him to be able to occupy himself with something fruitful, something that will give him a reward, or something to feel proud of, something that will leave him feeling happy!
    Good luck! I think you just have to try out.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    Let me preface by saying this is from personal experience with peers with Autism, not with children or any sort of informed opinion.

    Kids with Aspergers will get really into something like, really into it. Most of the guys I've come across with it tend to get into 'geeky' passtimes because they find it hard to be around a lot of people for a long time. They both ****ing love minecraft if that helps :cool:

    They tend to find social cues hard, which is why their interaction isn't great, and younger kids aren't all that understanding. So my best advice is to ask him what he's into, they'll be something, and try and connect with that. Maybe it's films, games, a certain set of books. Don't know if any of that helps.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Well already he's said to me that he's enjoying the club a lot more now and feels safer, which is fantastic!
    But he spends so much of his time doing, well, nothing. I want him to be able to occupy himself with something fruitful, something that will give him a reward, or something to feel proud of, something that will leave him feeling happy!
    Aspergers is all about a high capacity for patterns combined with a low intuition for how people work. So I'm guessing this young guy would be happy if left alone with some kind of puzzles or games or mechanical equipment to explore. Maybe something musical?

    Please don't try to make him 'fit in'. In his world, many people are scary and unpredictable. He will feel more comfortable around others who "do what they say on the tin". If you want to encourage him to interact, choose a quiet friend and give them a game or other structured task.
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    (Original post by ian.slater)
    Aspergers is all about a high capacity for patterns combined with a low intuition for how people work. So I'm guessing this young guy would be happy if left alone with some kind of puzzles or games or mechanical equipment to explore. Maybe something musical?

    Please don't try to make him 'fit in'. In his world, many people are scary and unpredictable. He will feel more comfortable around others who "do what they say on the tin". If you want to encourage him to interact, choose a quiet friend and give them a game or other structured task.
    I don't necessarily want him to just fit in, but to make at least a couple of people he considers almost friends, people he won't feel intimidated by. That way if I'm ill for instance and can make it into work, he'll have some people who he might stay close to, who he might feel secure with.

    I might try and introduce him to chess. He's no very into construction based things (lego, building blocks etc.)

    I might also try and bring in a suduko if I can.

    Any specific ideas on that front?
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I don't necessarily want him to just fit in, but to make at least a couple of people he considers almost friends, people he won't feel intimidated by. That way if I'm ill for instance and can make it into work, he'll have some people who he might stay close to, who he might feel secure with.

    I might try and introduce him to chess. He's no very into construction based things (lego, building blocks etc.)

    I might also try and bring in a suduko if I can.

    Any specific ideas on that front?
    You could ask him about his interests? It's quite possible he has some collection or favourite activity. And you could work from there. Music or maths would be quite probable.

    I work with older students (Y10-Y13) who have high mathematical ability. Some degree of Aspergers is so common as to be unexceptional. Personally I regard the 'diagnosis' as quite unhelpful, because it carries the stigma of a label.
    • TSR Support Team
    • Very Important Poster
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    As mentioned above, we're all different. Are you aware whether he has any sensory issues? And does he need routine? I have a friend whose son possibly has Aspergers and his mum said that everything has to be done in a certain order. We're not all like that though.

    If he doesn't want to socialise, don't force him. My so-called support worker doesn't seem to understand that forcing me to meet strange people in noisy places is a no-no for me and I just refuse to do it. She then wonders why I fail to keep and make appointments. :rolleyes:

    (By the way, do you know, that he is autistic? It isn't that easy to diagnose.)
    If he has Aspegers, he will be Autistic.
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    (Original post by OU Student)
    As mentioned above, we're all different. Are you aware whether he has any sensory issues? And does he need routine? I have a friend whose son possibly has Aspergers and his mum said that everything has to be done in a certain order. We're not all like that though.

    If he doesn't want to socialise, don't force him. My so-called support worker doesn't seem to understand that forcing me to meet strange people in noisy places is a no-no for me and I just refuse to do it. She then wonders why I fail to keep and make appointments. :rolleyes:



    If he has Aspegers, he will be Autistic.
    Fair enough . Like I say I have no knowledge of aspergers or really autism. Unless reading the curious incident counts :awesome: . So all of these view points and information are so so useful to me!
    Soon he'll be able to go to another room, so hopefully he'll appreciate being out of the noisy room.
    • TSR Support Team
    • Very Important Poster
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Soon he'll be able to go to another room, so hopefully he'll appreciate being out of the noisy room.
    A lot of us do have issues with noise and being moved to a quiet room helps.
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    (Original post by OU Student)
    A lot of us do have issues with noise and being moved to a quiet room helps.
    Well it's been a bit different recently.
    We had a structure we stuck to inside the club. He then joined us in there, which was good! Then someone got rid of the structure, meaning things got louder, but the room he'd been in previously has been used for something else now. Hopefully some more structure will come in again soon though. And I might be able to start a chess club, if I can I'd like to slowly bring in some other things to it, like suduko etc., so that it becomes a chess and puzzle group, giving people a place of concentration so that they can challenge themselves.

    But to add to the larger problem, there just isn't enough working equipment either. Once the next order comes in things should be different, but until them getting the children focused is very difficult!

    I still have a headache from today, luckily the boy with aspergers wasn't in today, otherwise I think he'd have hated it even more than he used to!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    From my experiences there's useful something which an indiviual is really overly passionate about, ask his parent/carers for help on this and from there you'll be able to play/interact with him more whilst doing something he enjoys.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by OU Student)
    If he has Aspegers, he will be Autistic.
    That wasn't the point of my question. My question was, if he is officially diagnosed, as that wasn't mentioned clearly in the first post. (At least to me that wasn't obvious, thus I asked.)
    • TSR Support Team
    • Very Important Poster
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Nathanielle)
    That wasn't the point of my question. My question was, if he is officially diagnosed, as that wasn't mentioned clearly in the first post. (At least to me that wasn't obvious, thus I asked.)
    Your question didn't ask that.
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    (Original post by Nathanielle)
    That wasn't the point of my question. My question was, if he is officially diagnosed, as that wasn't mentioned clearly in the first post. (At least to me that wasn't obvious, thus I asked.)

    (Original post by OU Student)
    Your question didn't ask that.
    Whilst it didn't ask that, it wasn't clearly started in the OP, but has been answered, so that it's there again, yes, he has been officially diagnosed!
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: May 30, 2013
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Are unpaid trial work shifts fair?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.