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    Hey guys I'm a GCSE student so I have virtually no knowledge about uni. I was just wondering about the tuition fees. I've seen in various places that it is around 9k per yer. In regards to medics, would you have to pay this for all the years because I am aware that it could take you 5+ years to get a degree in medics. Also what do the fees actually include except for like lectures. If that's the case how much student loan would the government give because I'm not from a well off background. And 1 more question, how exactly could you fail in getting your degree, is it exam based or what.
    Sorry for not having any knowledge about this so try and bear with me
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    Pretty much everywhere (and certainly everywhere that offers medicine) charges 9k / year, so medicine would cost 45k etc. living costs

    Student Living costs vary depending on where you go (i.e. a lot more students are staying at home which would cut costs), etc. But don't be put off by the costs, there are loads of finance and bursaries available, see: https://www.gov.uk/student-finance

    The fees add to the student loan, which you need to repay, but you only need to start repaying it once you start earning a reasonable amount (>21k / year) and only very slowly anyway. The government website gives a really clear indication of the cost, but it's not as if bailiffs will be coming round if you can't afford to pay upfront! Far from the truth https://www.gov.uk/student-finance
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    (Original post by __Student__)
    Hey guys I'm a GCSE student so I have virtually no knowledge about uni. I was just wondering about the tuition fees. I've seen in various places that it is around 9k per yer. In regards to medics, would you have to pay this for all the years because I am aware that it could take you 5+ years to get a degree in medics. Also what do the fees actually include except for like lectures. If that's the case how much student loan would the government give because I'm not from a well off background. And 1 more question, how exactly could you fail in getting your degree, is it exam based or what.
    Sorry for not having any knowledge about this so try and bear with me
    You only pay tuition fees for years 1-4 during a medicine degree as the NHS pays for your final year's tuition at medical school. If you want to know how much you'd be entitled to in terms of maintenance loans and grants, you can have a look on the Student Finance England website. They have a calculator on there somewhere :P Be aware though that the amounts you're entitled to will almost definitely change by the time you get round to applying for finance
    Medical degrees are often examined via examination papers and exams called OSCE's which are Objective Structured Clinical Examinations..almost like a practical exam for clinical skills like communication, taking bloods, cannulation etc. etc. The structure of the exams will vary from med school to med school though, so you'd have to check the individual websites. Some med schools allow a limited number or resits, but if you fail those without a good excuse, I imagine you would be asked to leave.
    Your tuition fees will cover..well all your tuition, so you have to pay for accommodation, food, transport to clinical placements (although some medical schools will reimburse you the travel costs) etc. etc.
    Hope that helped!
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    (Original post by __Student__)
    Hey guys I'm a GCSE student so I have virtually no knowledge about uni. I was just wondering about the tuition fees. I've seen in various places that it is around 9k per yer. In regards to medics, would you have to pay this for all the years because I am aware that it could take you 5+ years to get a degree in medics. Also what do the fees actually include except for like lectures. If that's the case how much student loan would the government give because I'm not from a well off background. And 1 more question, how exactly could you fail in getting your degree, is it exam based or what.
    Sorry for not having any knowledge about this so try and bear with me
    Hiya!

    Firstly the £9000 is for tuition fee's - this covers lectures, seminars, tutorials and that kind of thing. Medical courses are 5+ years, and you get a loan from the government to pay for the full tuition fee costs.

    The government then also give you 'living costs'. This comes in the form of a grant (which you don't pay back) and a loan. The amount you get depends on whether you study in London, or outside of London, and how much your parents earn. If your parents jointly earn less than £25,000 per year you'll get the full funding, which will definitely cover your accommodation costs (whether you live in halls or privately), and will also cover your food, as well as books and give you a bit of a social life it would be around £6,000 - £9,000 per year you could get. You will also be eligible for bursaries (which don't have to be paid back) from your university which are in the region of £1000 per year.

    Pretty much every degree is in 'modules' which are like different subjects, within the main degree. I am doing Law so I have modules in different types of Law. You have exams and coursework. I believe medicine also has practical examinations too. You need to pass all your modules to be able to get a degree. If you fail exams or coursework you have opportunities to re-sit them. Obviously if you want a good job, you need to get high marks though. The grading system in university is similar to A Levels and GCSE in that a certain amount of marks gets you a cartain grade. In degree's they are graded as 3rd, 2:2, 2:1, First (First is best, Third is worst).

    I hope this helped!
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    (Original post by Larry31)
    You only pay tuition fees for years 1-4 during a medicine degree as the NHS pays for your final year's tuition at medical school. If you want to know how much you'd be entitled to in terms of maintenance loans and grants, you can have a look on the Student Finance England website. They have a calculator on there somewhere :P Be aware though that the amounts you're entitled to will almost definitely change by the time you get round to applying for finance
    Medical degrees are often examined via examination papers and exams called OSCE's which are Objective Structured Clinical Examinations..almost like a practical exam for clinical skills like communication, taking bloods, cannulation etc. etc. The structure of the exams will vary from med school to med school though, so you'd have to check the individual websites. Some med schools allow a limited number or resits, but if you fail those without a good excuse, I imagine you would be asked to leave.
    Your tuition fees will cover..well all your tuition, so you have to pay for accommodation, food, transport to clinical placements (although some medical schools will reimburse you the travel costs) etc. etc.
    Hope that helped!
    Sorry so you mean that on top of your tuition fee you have to pay for food, accommodation etc... or are they all inclusive? If not what is actually included in the fess
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    (Original post by Knalchemist)
    Hiya!

    Firstly the £9000 is for tuition fee's - this covers lectures, seminars, tutorials and that kind of thing. Medical courses are 5+ years, and you get a loan from the government to pay for the full tuition fee costs.

    The government then also give you 'living costs'. This comes in the form of a grant (which you don't pay back) and a loan. The amount you get depends on whether you study in London, or outside of London, and how much your parents earn. If your parents jointly earn less than £25,000 per year you'll get the full funding, which will definitely cover your accommodation costs (whether you live in halls or privately), and will also cover your food, as well as books and give you a bit of a social life it would be around £6,000 - £9,000 per year you could get. You will also be eligible for bursaries (which don't have to be paid back) from your university which are in the region of £1000 per year.

    Pretty much every degree is in 'modules' which are like different subjects, within the main degree. I am doing Law so I have modules in different types of Law. You have exams and coursework. I believe medicine also has practical examinations too. You need to pass all your modules to be able to get a degree. If you fail exams or coursework you have opportunities to re-sit them. Obviously if you want a good job, you need to get high marks though. The grading system in university is similar to A Levels and GCSE in that a certain amount of marks gets you a cartain grade. In degree's they are graded as 3rd, 2:2, 2:1, First (First is best, Third is worst).

    I hope this helped!
    Oh thanks looks like I don't have much to worry about with the fees, as for now I just need to put my head down and make sure that I get my good grades
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    brah, its like easy 70 grand for 5 years . 80 if u be chillin in london.
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    ya naw mean
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    (Original post by __Student__)
    Sorry so you mean that on top of your tuition fee you have to pay for food, accommodation etc... or are they all inclusive? If not what is actually included in the fess
    Yes that's right, you get a tuition fee loan from the Government that covers the £9000 per year tuition fees, and then you have to pay for all the accommodation, food etc. using the maintenance loans and grants you'll be given
    As an average, they say that you'll spend £9000 on tuition per year, plus (very roughly) about £7000 per year on living expenses that you are helped out with using maintenance loans and grants

    EDIT: For Medicine you don't have to worry about degree classification (i.e. First, 2.1, 2.2, Third) because Medicine is not classified; It's pass/fail only
 
 
 
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