Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hi I need help with question 6Bi on this paper:

    http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/subjects...1-QP-JAN12.PDF

    the MS says the answer is 12v but i just dont know how

    someone explain PLZ
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Momoals)
    Hi I need help with question 6Bi on this paper:

    http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/subjects...1-QP-JAN12.PDF

    the MS says the answer is 12v but i just dont know how

    someone explain PLZ
    Total Voltage in series = Sum of the Voltage drops at each component in series.
    Total voltage in parallel is always the same...

    So there is the same voltage drop at X as at R2 & Y as they're in parallel, which is just what X uses as you definitely know that... Then apply the rules to R1 to get the answer...
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Piguy)
    Total Voltage in series = Sum of the Voltage drops at each component in series.
    Total voltage in parallel is always the same...

    So there is the same voltage drop at X as at R2 & Y as they're in parallel, which is just what X uses as you definitely know that... Then apply the rules to R1 to get the answer...
    still not too sure, if R1=12, X=12 then where did the 4.5 come from , arghh its hard to explain in text

    for 1 mark it seems like it should be easy, but i dont understand it, can anyone give me a webpage that explains
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Post if you get it please
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    4.5? Where did you get that from? You only need that for part (a), not b(i)

    It is simple, you're just over thinking it... voltage drop on the components on the right side (X, Y & R_2) is just X, because voltages in parallel are equal. You're told what X is.

    So voltage in R1 = Total voltage - Voltage in X!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Piguy)
    4.5? Where did you get that from? You only need that for part (a), not b(i)

    It is simple, you're just over thinking it... voltage drop on the components on the right side (X, Y & R_2) is just X, because voltages in parallel are equal. You're told what X is.

    So voltage in R1 = Total voltage - Voltage in X!
    I think he got confused of the 4,5 V
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by yodawg321)
    I think he got confused of the 4,5 V
    Makes the most sense, that's the trouble you get into if you use the mark scheme too much when doing past papers that you forget what the question is actually about :cool:
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Piguy)
    4.5? Where did you get that from? You only need that for part (a), not b(i)

    It is simple, you're just over thinking it... voltage drop on the components on the right side (X, Y & R_2) is just X, because voltages in parallel are equal. You're told what X is.

    So voltage in R1 = Total voltage - Voltage in X!
    is this kirchoffs law?

    so wait a min, the total voltage in a circuit: volatge in each component?

    thanks for help guys but i guess ill need to ask my teacher about it
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Momoals)
    is this kirchoffs law?

    so wait a min, the total voltage in a circuit: volatge in each component?

    thanks for help guys but i guess ill need to ask my teacher about it

    Yeah it's Kirchoffs 2nd Law. In a closed loop sum of PD = EMF in a circuit. You're definition might be a but different as you're AQA
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Momoals)
    is this kirchoffs law?

    so wait a min, the total voltage in a circuit: volatge in each component?

    thanks for help guys but i guess ill need to ask my teacher about it
    You don't need to bother with Kirchoffs laws, they just complicate things (although you could very well answer the question using them i.e. 2nd law: sum pd = sum of emfs), it's a basic GCSE circuits concept:

    Total Voltage in Series: you add Voltage of each component
    Total Voltage in Parallel: it's always the same at each component

    You can derive it from V=IR and the fact that the Total Current in Series is always the same; and total current in parallel is added...
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Piguy)
    You don't need to bother with Kirchoffs laws, they just complicate things (although you could very well answer the question using them i.e. 2nd law: sum pd = sum of emfs), it's a basic GCSE circuits concept:

    Total Voltage in Series: you add Voltage of each component
    Total Voltage in Parallel: it's always the same at each component

    You can derive it from V=IR and the fact that the Total Current in Series is always the same; and total current in parallel is added...
    Right, so R1 will use 12V
    The circuit which includes R2 will use 12V too as we can treat them both as Series.
    But in that circuit is X and Y and the resistor, do they ALL use 12v or are they split equally?

    Overthinking this and I'm not even doing AQA physics!
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    12v is on x, and 12 is shared between y and r2


    Posted from TSR Mobile
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Brussels sprouts
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.