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    How and why does every cell in the human body have sodium potassium ion pumps? If it does then don't sodium ions just leak out of out skin?
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    Pumps are involved in active transport so things don't just 'leak' through them. Sodium is released in sweat from the skin.

    Sodium and potassium pumps are present on all cell types because both ions are quite important for cell signalling and maintaining charge across membranes.
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    (Original post by alleycat393)
    Pumps are involved in active transport so things don't just 'leak' through them. Sodium is released in sweat from the skin.

    Sodium and potassium pumps are present on all cell types because both ions are quite important for cell signalling and maintaining charge across membranes.
    No I mean you know the membrane that's in contact with the air, if that also has sodium-potassium pumps as 3 sodium ions are pumped out for every 3 potassium ions pumped in, then aren't the sodium ions lost, so how can the resting potential be maintained and how can it be depolarised?
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    There's still a layer of oil between the cells and the air so the Na ions are not always lost. This process is tightly regulated to prevent unnecessary loss. I think it's 3 Na ions to 2 K ions which is what causes a gradient. But other ions like Ca, Cl and H ions are also involved in polarisation and depolarisation.
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    (Original post by alleycat393)
    There's still a layer of oil between the cells and the air so the Na ions are not always lost. This process is tightly regulated to prevent unnecessary loss. I think it's 3 Na ions to 2 K ions which is what causes a gradient. But other ions like Ca, Cl and H ions are also involved in polarisation and depolarisation.
    thank you
 
 
 
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