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    Can someone explain these terms. Also if a certain mutation occurs in these genes does cancer occur?
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    (Original post by MX123)
    Can someone explain these terms. Also if a certain mutation occurs in these genes does cancer occur?
    Tumour suppressor genes regulate cell growth by stopping mitosis, oncogenes are the genes that have the potential to develop into cancerous cells (ergo a tumour)

    A mututation is a change in a base sequence so say there is a mutation on the tumour suppressor gene the gene would no longer be functional and therefore stop cell division leading to the development of cancer via uncontrollable cell growth
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    (Original post by lilGem)
    Tumour suppressor genes regulate cell growth by stopping mitosis, oncogenes are the genes that have the potential to develop into cancerous cells (ergo a tumour)

    A mututation is a change in a base sequence so say there is a mutation on the tumour suppressor gene the gene would no longer be functional and therefore stop cell division leading to the development of cancer via uncontrollable cell growth
    Just as an add-on to this, typically tumour suppressor genes will require a mutation in both copies of the gene to cause a cancer, as one functional copy will prevent the cell cycle from going into overdrive. On the other hand, oncogenes cause cancer when they are mutated (often they're part of a signalling pathway that tells the cell to divide and when mutated constantly give that signal) and therefore a mutation is only required in one copy of it.

    There are exceptions to this, but that's a good general rule and is a nice example that helps you remember the difference between the two.
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    (Original post by lilGem)
    Tumour suppressor genes regulate cell growth by stopping mitosis, oncogenes are the genes that have the potential to develop into cancerous cells (ergo a tumour)

    A mututation is a change in a base sequence so say there is a mutation on the tumour suppressor gene the gene would no longer be functional and therefore stop cell division leading to the development of cancer via uncontrollable cell growth
    (Original post by Rob da Mop)
    Just as an add-on to this, typically tumour suppressor genes will require a mutation in both copies of the gene to cause a cancer, as one functional copy will prevent the cell cycle from going into overdrive. On the other hand, oncogenes cause cancer when they are mutated (often they're part of a signalling pathway that tells the cell to divide and when mutated constantly give that signal) and therefore a mutation is only required in one copy of it.

    There are exceptions to this, but that's a good general rule and is a nice example that helps you remember the difference between the two.
    Awesome, thanks!
 
 
 
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