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Of Mice and Men Help - PLEASE ! watch

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    Guys I'm desperate, doing the english lit exam next week but the last time I did an essay on of mice and men was a whole year ago. Can someone please help me out, I have revision books and many resources but can someone help me structure out a question. If any of you have any example essays can I look at them please, don't matter what grade I just want to see how to write it and improve it
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    George shoots lennie

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    i feel as if i'm in the exact same predicament as you are! we read of mice and men last year and at the mo we're all hot and bothered about darn poetry for my teach to shed light on the fact that the only thing memorable about of mice and men to most of us is lennie wanting ketchup.
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    Hey
    Don't worry guys. Use spark notes or a study guide. They're really helpful.
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    (Original post by catscott94)
    George shoots lennie

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    He wants an exam worthy essay - please at least punctuate!


    There are a lot of sites like this, but probably the best thing you could do would be to re-read the book (preferably an annotated copy, or find your old notes if you have them) then find an essay title from a past paper or ask a teacher for one and write an essay yourself. Then ask your english teacher if they can mark it for you and direct you as to where you can improve.

    Just reading examples is unlikely to be very helpful as titles vary, and why would theirs be any better than your own anyway?! A chat with your english teacher about everything would be best - they'll know the best ways for you to prepare.
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    Hey sorry as I can't help much as I'm in a rather similar dilemma but I can tell you to check out the Official thread for the AQA English literature, the answer may come up there!
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    I got marked at just about an A for this homework

    Q. How does Steinbeck present attitudes to women in the society in which the novella is set?
    A. Throughout the novella Steinbeck deliberately under-represents women, with the only female to physically make an appearance being Curley’s wife, and she is not even afforded the dignity of a name. This is perhaps to reflect the fact that women in 1930s America often weren’t afforded the thought and importance their equal numbers with men deserved. Only three types of women appear or are described in Steinbeck’s Of Mice and Men; “Aunt Clara”, portrayed as the domestic hero and noble housewife women at the time were generally expected to become – then, Curley’s wife being an example, there is also those who have failed to become the above, and hence are instead dismissed as a “tart” or “jailbait” by the ranch hands. The third includes “Susy”; the owner of a brothel, “crackin’ jokes all the time”.

    Steinbeck’s depiction of attitudes towards women in 1930s America is therefore quite disturbing; always either a housewife, a prostitute, or somewhere on the line between. Upon her introduction, Steinbeck is immediately dismissive of Curley’s wife, choosing to describe her as a “girl” rather than a ‘woman’, then describing only her appearance as “heavily made up”, and wearing a “cotton house dress”, as if these were the only important features about her. Tragically, Curley’s wife herself seems to realise her placement at the bottom of the hierarchy of the ranch, when she includes herself in noting “they left all the weak ones here”. Indeed, she relies on her husband for any place among them, perhaps a sad reflection that a woman’s social standing was often only as high as who her husband was.

    The loneliness of a migrant worker, the American Dream (or more relevant, their failure to achieve it) and the endless cycle of work are common themes in Of Mice and Men, yet all the same ideas apply to Curley’s wife as well as to the ranch workers. Just as it is George and Lennie’s dream to own their own farm and “live off the fatta’ the lan’”, it was her dream to “be in the movies”. George and Lennie are lucky to have each other’s company, and they realise it: “Guys like us ... are the loneliest guys in the world... They don’t belong no place”. Curley’s wife, however, suffers from an equivalent crippling loneliness; Curley’s failure to provide adequate company for her, treating her instead as a sexual object, causes her to desperate seek attention from the other ranch hands (“Think I don’t like to talk to somebody ever’ once in a while? Think I like to stick in that house alla time?”). Furthermore, just as George, Lennie and Candy’s dreams are broken by the end of the novella, Curley’s wife’s already had been broken when she married Curley. In attaching many of the same themes to Curley’s wife, he points out that women are exactly the same as men, with the same emotions and passions, and should be treated as such, and so is criticising 1930s American attitudes towards women.
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    (Original post by PoisonSky)
    I got marked at just about an A for this homework

    Q. How does Steinbeck present attitudes to women in the society in which the novella is set?
    A. Throughout the novella Steinbeck deliberately under-represents women, with the only female to physically make an appearance being Curley’s wife, and she is not even afforded the dignity of a name. This is perhaps to reflect the fact that women in 1930s America often weren’t afforded the thought and importance their equal numbers with men deserved. Only three types of women appear or are described in Steinbeck’s Of Mice and Men; “Aunt Clara”, portrayed as the domestic hero and noble housewife women at the time were generally expected to become – then, Curley’s wife being an example, there is also those who have failed to become the above, and hence are instead dismissed as a “tart” or “jailbait” by the ranch hands. The third includes “Susy”; the owner of a brothel, “crackin’ jokes all the time”.

    Steinbeck’s depiction of attitudes towards women in 1930s America is therefore quite disturbing; always either a housewife, a prostitute, or somewhere on the line between. Upon her introduction, Steinbeck is immediately dismissive of Curley’s wife, choosing to describe her as a “girl” rather than a ‘woman’, then describing only her appearance as “heavily made up”, and wearing a “cotton house dress”, as if these were the only important features about her. Tragically, Curley’s wife herself seems to realise her placement at the bottom of the hierarchy of the ranch, when she includes herself in noting “they left all the weak ones here”. Indeed, she relies on her husband for any place among them, perhaps a sad reflection that a woman’s social standing was often only as high as who her husband was.

    The loneliness of a migrant worker, the American Dream (or more relevant, their failure to achieve it) and the endless cycle of work are common themes in Of Mice and Men, yet all the same ideas apply to Curley’s wife as well as to the ranch workers. Just as it is George and Lennie’s dream to own their own farm and “live off the fatta’ the lan’”, it was her dream to “be in the movies”. George and Lennie are lucky to have each other’s company, and they realise it: “Guys like us ... are the loneliest guys in the world... They don’t belong no place”. Curley’s wife, however, suffers from an equivalent crippling loneliness; Curley’s failure to provide adequate company for her, treating her instead as a sexual object, causes her to desperate seek attention from the other ranch hands (“Think I don’t like to talk to somebody ever’ once in a while? Think I like to stick in that house alla time?”). Furthermore, just as George, Lennie and Candy’s dreams are broken by the end of the novella, Curley’s wife’s already had been broken when she married Curley. In attaching many of the same themes to Curley’s wife, he points out that women are exactly the same as men, with the same emotions and passions, and should be treated as such, and so is criticising 1930s American attitudes towards women.
    Thanks I will look at this
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    (Original post by Hearty_Beast)
    He wants an exam worthy essay - please at least punctuate!


    There are a lot of sites like this, but probably the best thing you could do would be to re-read the book (preferably an annotated copy, or find your old notes if you have them) then find an essay title from a past paper or ask a teacher for one and write an essay yourself. Then ask your english teacher if they can mark it for you and direct you as to where you can improve.

    Just reading examples is unlikely to be very helpful as titles vary, and why would theirs be any better than your own anyway?! A chat with your english teacher about everything would be best - they'll know the best ways for you to prepare.
    I have told my teacher but she said that the most effective way she could help me is by me writing an essay. That's what I'm trying to do now but I don't have a clue what I am writing. I got more than enough resources but just dont know how to structure the essay. The two questions I'm doing atm are:
    Part (a) In this passage, what methods does Steinbeck use to present Curley’s wife and the
    attitudes of others to her? Refer closely to the passage in your answer.
    and then Part (b)
    How does Steinbeck present attitudes to women in the society in which the novel is set?'
    Could you just give me a simple structure so e.g. Introduction - Write about x and so on. Because what im doing now is just picking out quotes without any structure
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    (Original post by catscott94)
    George shoots lennie

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    If I wasn't aware of what happens in the novella would I bother asking how to write a response to it. Kmt
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    What exactly do you need help with? It was a while ago since I did this, but I remember we focused a lot on power: Physical power, (Lennie, Steinbeck gives him a lot of animalistic characters such as bear claw or something?) power on the ranch: Slim, he is so important in the novel: Whatever he says go, for e.g. shooting of Candy's dog its only after Slim says he should do it that Candy agrees, when Curley & Lennie have that fight, Slim orders Curley not to say anything and he agrees. And when Slim is introduced I remember Steinbeck saying something like he had a majestic movement? Early chapters.
    Hope that helps
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    (Original post by Chicago)
    If I wasn't aware of what happens in the novella would I bother asking how to write a response to it. Kmt
    Good, just sharing the knowledge used to acquire my A* GCSE Lit grade!


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    (Original post by catscott94)
    Good, just sharing the knowledge used to acquire my A* GCSE Lit grade!


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Help me get an A* as well
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    (Original post by Chicago)
    Help me get an A* as well
    Ahaha wish I could but after two years and A Level Lit, the most I can remember is that and probably some bull**** about comparing the fragility of both Lennie and animals! Honestly you'll be fine as long as you support your claims with evidence from the text
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    (Original post by PoisonSky)
    I got marked at just about an A for this homework

    Q. How does Steinbeck present attitudes to women in the society in which the novella is set?
    A. Throughout the novella Steinbeck deliberately under-represents women, with the only female to physically make an appearance being Curley’s wife, and she is not even afforded the dignity of a name. This is perhaps to reflect the fact that women in 1930s America often weren’t afforded the thought and importance their equal numbers with men deserved. Only three types of women appear or are described in Steinbeck’s Of Mice and Men; “Aunt Clara”, portrayed as the domestic hero and noble housewife women at the time were generally expected to become – then, Curley’s wife being an example, there is also those who have failed to become the above, and hence are instead dismissed as a “tart” or “jailbait” by the ranch hands. The third includes “Susy”; the owner of a brothel, “crackin’ jokes all the time”.

    Steinbeck’s depiction of attitudes towards women in 1930s America is therefore quite disturbing; always either a housewife, a prostitute, or somewhere on the line between. Upon her introduction, Steinbeck is immediately dismissive of Curley’s wife, choosing to describe her as a “girl” rather than a ‘woman’, then describing only her appearance as “heavily made up”, and wearing a “cotton house dress”, as if these were the only important features about her. Tragically, Curley’s wife herself seems to realise her placement at the bottom of the hierarchy of the ranch, when she includes herself in noting “they left all the weak ones here”. Indeed, she relies on her husband for any place among them, perhaps a sad reflection that a woman’s social standing was often only as high as who her husband was.

    The loneliness of a migrant worker, the American Dream (or more relevant, their failure to achieve it) and the endless cycle of work are common themes in Of Mice and Men, yet all the same ideas apply to Curley’s wife as well as to the ranch workers. Just as it is George and Lennie’s dream to own their own farm and “live off the fatta’ the lan’”, it was her dream to “be in the movies”. George and Lennie are lucky to have each other’s company, and they realise it: “Guys like us ... are the loneliest guys in the world... They don’t belong no place”. Curley’s wife, however, suffers from an equivalent crippling loneliness; Curley’s failure to provide adequate company for her, treating her instead as a sexual object, causes her to desperate seek attention from the other ranch hands (“Think I don’t like to talk to somebody ever’ once in a while? Think I like to stick in that house alla time?”). Furthermore, just as George, Lennie and Candy’s dreams are broken by the end of the novella, Curley’s wife’s already had been broken when she married Curley. In attaching many of the same themes to Curley’s wife, he points out that women are exactly the same as men, with the same emotions and passions, and should be treated as such, and so is criticising 1930s American attitudes towards women.
    This is really good I especially liked the way you used the similar feelings in men and women to show how Steinbeck disapproves of the ranch hands' derogatory attitudes towards women.

    Another way Steinbeck shows his attitude to Curley's wife is when Lennie and her were talking in Chapter 5. They seem to be very similar, both very innocent and naive with their love for soft things and dreams. And when she dies, he describes her as "very pretty and simple" with "all the meanness and the plannings and the discontent and the ache for attention...gone from her face". Almost as if she is better off dead than she was alive, because now she isn't part of a cruel world where all she got was unhappiness and loneliness.

    Her death in this way is again, almost the same as Lennie's. THe reader may think it was better off that way, for Lennie to die happily, thinking his dream was finally coming true.
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    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=2352660

    look at this someone it would really help
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    Wow, you've just written the answer to my homework
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    Of mice and men is a novel written in 1937 and set in the 1930’s America in California written by John Steinbeck. This novel tells the story of two travelling companions, George and Lennie, who wander the country, dreaming of a better life for themselves. Then, just as there dream is within their grasp, it is inevitably yanked away. Lennie has the mentality of a child and doesn’t know his own strength causing frequent problems for his companion George. An incident with a young girl leads to a tragic end for this essay i will be evaluating how John Steinbeck presents the characters of Curley’s wife.
    Curley’s wife is a complex and complicated character in John Steinbeck’s novel, “Of mice and men” she is introduced at the beginning of the novel and ultimately causes the end of the novel, her innocence and flirtatiousness leading to her inevitable death at the hand of Lennie, confused and scared by her forwardness and eventual uproar.
    She is first introduced by Candy, the swamper, who describes her from his perspective to George and Lennie. The fact that curley’s wife is introduced through rumours means that the reader already has an opinion of curley’s wife before she even enters the scene. Candy mentions that she “got the eye” explaining that she is flirtations and immoral in that we are hit with the fact that she flirts with other men, immediately after is it stated that she is married to Curley. Already, the reader is introduced to the idea that Curley’s wife is a “tart” which is proven by her first appearance.
    She is first seen in the door way of the bunkhouse, asking about their location of her husband, which is soon revealed as being a weak excuse to interact with the ranch workers. She is wearing a “red cotton house dress” and a pair of mules decorated with “bouquets of red ostrich feathers.” Emphasising her sexual presence with the colour red, which is expressed repeatedly when Curles’s wife’s clothes and often described, this is often referred to as the colour of love and passion. Additionally the bouquets of ostrich feathers, also described as red, on the insteps of her shoes would have been extremely expensive in the times that Of mice and men was set; and that curley’s wife not only wears them on her feet but in the middle of the “dust bowl” expressed her desperate need for attentions she is willing to possibly ruin her best shoes in order to entice the ranch workers, despite the fact that she has a husband.
    Not only is Curley’s wife described as a “floozy” but she is also described as being threatening. Upon entering Crooks’s room, it is apparent that Crooks and Candy are afraid of her when they both scowled down away from her eyes. This deliberate prevention of eye contact could suggest that they don’t feel the need to dignify her with eye contact. The use of the word “scowling” means that either way, the presence of Curley’s wife displeases both Candy and crooks. Eventually Curley’s wife explodes at Crooks in a series of threatening comments after he sticks up for himself, “i could get you strung up so easy.” Crooks then retracts all emotions and becomes very weak and submission because of Curley’s wife’s threats on the other hand, in this encounter you begin to realise that cause of her unfriendliness, as it mentions that Curley’s wife would like to “bust him.“ referring to Curley. The fact Curley’s wife has admitted that despite being his wife, she would like to hurt him, creates the idea that Curley gives her a reason to. If Curley’s wife does in fact suffer domestic abuse then this may partly excuse her unfriendliness as she is mirroring the only atmosphere she is around whilst in the presence of her husband.
    Curley’s wife’s last appearance has a drastic affect on how she is presented in the novel. Whilst all the other ranch workers are playing horse shoe, Lennie is sat in the barn and is soon approached by Curley’s wife. Her dream of being in the limelight is unrealistic as all she ever does is casts shadows and attract negative attention. When she entered the barn, “sunshine in the door way was cut off.” Not only portraying her as a negative influence but also foreshadowing her dark end in the bard. Although as she slowly opens up to Lennie, despite his lack of interest, the reader gains more and more knowledge, her innocence and desire to escape and the drive to fulfil her dream that still remains, despite the circumstances. The true pureness of the character is expressed only upon her death, where her face is described as being, “sweet and young” and the “ache for attention was all gone for her face.” The use of the word “ache” implies that Curley’s wife’s need for attention was so strong that it hurt her personality. In argument with the new atmosphere caused by Curley’s wife’s death, and the realisation that she was never a floozy, the”sun streaks where high on the walls” and the burn was light again. This may be evidence of misjudgement in that the levels of light and atmosphere reflect Curley’s wife’s changing mood and appearance.
    Ultimately, despite all of the revelations about curley’s wife’s personality in the final scene, her death is caused by her never ending need for attention in that once Lennie reveals that he likes to pet soft things she offers up her hair, despite him telling her many things he pet end up dead, which is foreshadowing curley’s wife’s fate.
    It is apparent that curley’s wife’s anger stems from continuous betrayal by men and an unmet need for attention which is the factor that helps fuel her dream of becoming an actress. This is expressed throughout the novel in that Curley’s wife often mentions that she “coulda been in the movies.” But a letter starting her career, promised by a Hollywood produces she met at the Riverside Dance palace, never arrived. Foolishly, Curley’s wife believed her protective aunt stole the letter. This led to Curley’s wife leaving home as she believed her aunt was holding her back and her dream of becoming an actress was so strong she would not let anything get in the way. In leaving home she met Curley, whose anger stuck to her. The lingering anger caused by the betrayals and the lack of attention forced her to build layers over her true personality. The ultimately presented Curley’s wife as an angry wonan, whose seductive clothing and flirtatious gestures draw in the attention she so desperately desires but never used to receive; but further analysis shows she is so much deeper.
    Additionally, Curley’s wife is seen only as a possession of Curley, rather like a trophy wife. The face that Steinbeck writes the character as never once mentioning her real name prevents the likeliness of her having a personal relationship with anyone on the ranch, including her husband. This suppuration with the boss and his son, distances her from the powers of the ranch. But in turn, her association with the authority in that she lives in the boss’s house and is married to the boss’s son prevents her from building a relationship with the ranch workers as she is seen as a woman of power, despite the fact that she is actually very low in the hierarchy of the ranch, in the terms of her freedom and rights. This extreme loneliness changed Curley’s wife, loading her to knock down those of lower status on the ranch in order to make herself feel important and authorative. This is shown when she enters Crooks’s room and says “they left all the weak ones here” suggests the she conciders herself higher in status than Crooks, Candy and Lennie even thought she is displayed as so unimportant that Steinbeck does not even dignify her with a name.
    To summarize, i believe Curley’s wife, although being a complicated and often a sinister character, never intended to be or thought of herself as a floozy or a spiteful person, and although at times she was presented as one, faint hints always arose explaining why she was acting that way and that her true personality was not shining through.


    there you go A grade i think.
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    here ill send you a draft message me
 
 
 
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