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Race variation in Jail sentences: Can you think of absurb sentencing comparisons? Watch

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    I read this article about " Race variation in Jail sentences"
    Reflecting on this article, it sparked a question :
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/law/2011/n...entences-study


    From your newspaper reading experience or even your legal experience of whatever nature, can you think of absurd comparisons of sentences handed out in the UK?

    eg. Somebody physically assaulted somebody v's somebody stealing something petty and the sentencing amounted to the same despite the stark qualititative difference.
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    It's just the guardian trying to call someone racist, they'll move on to someone else tomorrow

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    (Original post by Josh94)
    It's just the guardian trying to call someone racist, they'll move on to someone else tomorrow

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    They've statistically analyzed 1 million court cases and found minorities are significantly more likely to receive harsher sentences for similar offences. It at least deserves some sort of further inquiry into the study and then perhaps the justice system.
    Respect to them for having the bravery to point out these issues and back them up with facts I say.
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    (Original post by Heidegger10)
    The Guardian always uses data that equates to points in favour of minorities, women, homosexuals etc.

    Can we be sure that their data analysis is correct and their starting point was correct. For example it sounds like their data set did not contain details of past offences. We know courts give harsher sentences to people with past offences so who is to say that this is consistent with the higher crime rates of certain minorities meaning they have more criminal history meaning higher sentences?

    It's funny how any analysis of data that comes out "against the narrative" is ALWAYS attacked for being biased, lack of scientific rigour, inconclusive etc. but analysts of data which goes for the narrative is not questioned.
    The base of the information is a report by the Ministry of Justice: here, so we can judge for ourselves.
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    The country's going mad.
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    Let’s reverse this.
    (Original post by Heidegger10)
    It's funny how any analysis of data that comes out "against the [Guardian] narrative" is ALWAYS attacked for being biased, lack of scientific rigour, inconclusive etc. but analysts of data which goes for the narrative is not questioned.
    (Original post by Heidegger10)
    The Guardian always uses data that equates to points in favour of minorities, women, homosexuals etc.
    Can we be sure that their data analysis is correct and their starting point was correct. For example it sounds like their data set did not contain details of past offences. We know courts give harsher sentences to people with past offences so who is to say that this is consistent with the higher crime rates of certain minorities meaning they have more criminal history meaning higher sentences?
    So when it’s your narrative being challenged, it’s OK to attack a study for being biased, inconclusive, and lacking scientific rigour? Maybe you should do the counter-analysis instead of speculating why a fairly well-sourced study simply must be wrong.
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    I know an absurb sentence when I see one.
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    (Original post by cambio wechsel)
    I know an absurb sentence when I see one.
    Apparently I repped you too recently to do so again, but that was excellent. Well played sir, well played.
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    The real craziness in sentencing is white collar versus blue collar crime. If you steal 10 million quid by holding up a bank you will be given 15 years and serve at least ten. If you put an advert in the paper for Unit Trusts and steal 10 million quid from a hundred thousand pensioners and widows you will get three years and serve 9 months!
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    As a Londoner it is obvious to me why there are variations in crime rate between races. Croydon is one reason. Tottenham is another. The country has been ghettoised with some races preferentially settling in areas that are disadvantaged.

    The Ministry of Justice has investigated Crime and Race ( see www.justice.gov.uk/downloads/statistics/mojstats/stats-race-cjs-2010.pdf )

    At first sight the fact that Black people are many times more likely to be stopped and searched than other races looks worrying but this is hardly surprising when so many black people live in areas that have very high crime rates. Some of these areas had high crime rates when they were poor white districts.
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    Funny how they pick up on this because it suits their agenda yet there is no mention men getting longer sentences than women.
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    They're forgetting that even if you split straight white men into two groups one would be more likely to be arrested for certain crimes than the other. Dumbass Guardian. Next you'll be telling me that all women are equal to each other. Or all black people are.
 
 
 
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