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    Hi All, Im Looking For A Little Help.
    Im 22 Years Old And Lookng At UnderGraduate Study At OU.
    I Cant Decide What Path Has Better Long Term Goals And Is Better For Me.
    Im Stuck Between Law / Engineering (Of Some Kind) And Design And Innovation (Design Engineering).
    But Im Looking To Do A Degree And Am A Little Confussed Between Whats What / Whats Worth Having And What Doesnt In Real World Make A Lot Of Difference.
    It Has To Be Somthing Where Jobs / Positions Are Avaiable Even If Starting From The Ground Up And More Learnining Is Required And Will Be Given When There.
    I Hope That Makes Sense.
    Any Help Would Be Greatly Apreciated.

    Nathan
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    Law is one of those degrees that people think that there are lots of jobs in, but there just aren't. While Law is definitely a "proper" degree, if you genuinely can't decide between them, then I would suggest going for engineering for job availability. As for what branch of engineering you go into, I'm not sure, but I think the OU only offers a "general" engineering degree.

    While an OU graduate to an employer is a very different thing to an ordinary graduate, they are in no way inferior. Most employers with any sense (and I'm sure you can tell that I share this view) believe good OU graduates to be not only well-educated, but driven and hard-working too.

    Also, may I ask, why are you capitalising every single word in your sentences?
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    Thanks for the fast reply,
    Firstly sorry for the capitalisation a force of habbit (not a good habbit either)

    I found your answer to be very helpful and to the point with regards to what way to go however id like a little more info if i may.
    When I mension what branch of engineering to progress maybe i am a little mis guided. It states on the OU site:
    Engineering design pathway
    Energy and sustainability pathway
    Environmental technologies pathway
    and this is what I was refering to at the time.
    Is the choice important or does it nt matter too muchh in the long term or general concept.

    There is also business studies as another area I have looked what are your thoughts on this and again its branches ie.
    Standard pathway
    Economics pathway
    Accounting pathway

    The accounting pathway percularly struck me as it mensions You and your money: personal finance in context as a module and as business and finance nderstanding i would presme go hand in hand??
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    Anybody??
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    accounting is a load of pap....if you want to do it, then go the AAT route...If engineering is what you want to do, you have to want to do it, not "just because it might pay well". If i were to do engineering degree again now, id probably go for the environmental side of things, because that is the future, jobs wise, as the environment isnt gonna get better all of a sudden, and of course all the renewable tech of course...
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    A few thoughts in no particular order:

    Bear in mind that a high proportion of graduate jobs don't ask for a degree in any particular discipline - so, any degree at all would open quite a lot of doors to you. I take it from your question that you don't have a specific career goal in mind? Law, Engineering, Design & Innovation, and Business Studies are quite different from one another, and it might be a good idea to think about what type of work you'd be good at/enjoy, to help you narrow it down. What are your strengths? What do you like doing?

    As a subject, Law is likely to involve absorbing lots of facts, and then using them to support an argument. Engineering is very technical and involves a lot of maths. Design & Innovation is quite hands-on and practical (I'm doing the Design modules as part of my degree, so I can tell you a bit about them if you're interested in knowing more). Does one of those sound more like your cup of tea than another?

    Also - and please don't take this the wrong way, I'm not trying to be nasty, it's just I think it might be relevant to your question - I'm a bit worried from the way your posts are written (spelling, grammar, etc.) that at the moment, you might struggle in trying to enter those professions. How did you do at school? What subjects did you like, and which were not your thing? Were you ever diagnosed with e.g. dyslexia or any similar problem that made it harder to study? If your experience of school wasn't positive, it may be worth looking into whether there are any local courses available to help you bring your key skills up to speed - that would be worth doing both to support your future studies, and to open up your career options. (Of course, you may just have been posting in a hurry, in which case, ignore this bit!)

    I'm not trying to put you off! I don't, at all, mean to suggest you shouldn't pursue a degree, and I think your questions about future prospects are really sensible, valid ones. My suggestion, though, would be to look at it the other way round - what are your strengths, what sort of job would you be happy in? Because to be honest, it doesn't matter how well-paid and well-respected a career is; if you hate it or it's a bad fit for you, you'll never be happy doing it.

    Once you've narrowed it down a bit, I'd suggest looking at doing one of the OU Access modules. They offer a really broad introduction to whichever subject you're interested in, so it's a good way to ease yourself back into study, and at the same time try the subject out to see if it's for you.

    Good luck!
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    Persipan, Thank you for your reply. Can I firstly say that yes my second post was written in somewhat or a rush so was written very badly, However yes I was also diagnosed with dyslexia at around 13 years old. As for my previous education unfortunately I only ever sat 3 GCSEs and got a C in 2 of them Maths and English. I did not read your questions / answers nasty in fact quite the opposite if knowing a little more of my background would help you to help me.
    Having left school 6 years ago (I’m now 22) it have bugged me more and more that I have very little / no education, not that I would class myself as stupid by any means. Hence my reason to now want to study.
    I am not looking for anything that will necessarily get me a high profile job nor one that is highly paid. I am just after something that gives me something that people can see and recognize that would show that despite my slow start I am eager, willing and capable of learning that also gives me several options of progression.
    Based on the descriptions in your post Design & Innovation sounds like something I’d be interested in as I do enjoy being very hands on (computer hardware technician by trade). However I am also very interested in business and why things happen i.e. following A, B & C achieves D. (slight side note have you ever heard of a book called the E-Myth? This perfectly describes what I mean here).
    I hope this helps a little more in getting an answer however I am swaying a lot towards Business studies although I’m not sure on what pathway.
    Again thanks everyone’s help on this.
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    Well, if you like the sound of both Design & Innovation, and Business Studies, you could think about doing the Design & Innovation Business Pathway which is basically a 50/50 split between the two.

    I can't tell you much about Business Studies as it's not my area. In terms of the Design & Innovation modules, so far I've just done the Level 1 one (U101, otherwise known as 'Lola') - I'm due to do Level 2 next year. I found U101 loads of fun, and as a way of getting back into study after maybe not having great prior experiences from school, I can imagine it working well; it's very much about wiping the slate clean of the kind of baggage we all build up over time that says our ideas are no good, and rediscovering child-like creativity and willingness to play and explore - and then, having rediscovered that side of yourself, harnessing it to solve design problems. The assignments involve various different designs (a t-shirt, a game, a group problem which could be more or less anything, and the final one you define for yourself what problem you want to work on) but it starts you out gently - the first week basically involves activities like 'make a decision using a paper aeroplane' and 'make a banana out of masking tape' and there's a lot of emphasis on how exploring all kinds of ideas, even ones that initially seem 'silly', can lead to effective solutions.

    I'm not trying to sway you in any particular direction, so if you're thinking you'd rather do Business Studies then go for it - but I hope that gives you a bit of an idea what studying the Design modules might be like. Feel free to ask if you want to know more!
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    Again, Thank you for your help. What pathway did you select within Design & Innovation just out of interest?
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    The first two years studying any engineering route through OU will be near the same. It will be the 3rd year that you can then decide to follow a certain route through choice of modules.

    Be prepared to study lots of maths within the first two years.

    Once you are qualified there is an abundance of engineering positions that need filled with lots of graduate opportunities
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    I'm not sure if I should start a new thread or continue with this one so I'm going to post here until someone corrects me. I have been doing a bit more thinking and would like to explain my situation further in the hope that more helps or direction may be available. I left school at the age of 16 with very few GCSEs (Math’s & English at C grade and Science at D grade). Since leaving school I have worked as a computer engineer with a local firm (no qualification earned or gained on this subject). I have now worked in this role for almost 7 years and am starting to find the prospect of "never becoming or doing something" very daunting. As I've said above, I'm dyslexic and therefore not so good with my words or grammar however my numeracy skills are reasonable good considering my level of education. I enjoy "getting stuck in" and enjoy logical challenges I also enjoy the understanding of (this may be the wrong word) consequences i.e. doing X and Y will make and cause Z or Having now got Z given X what was Y (I hope that makes sense). I also like the ability to be able to see and understand things for what they are or what they do to understand how and when you would want or need to use them. Reading a little more into what Persipan has mentioned in previous posts I have been considering Design, not like graphic / web design as I’m not too imaginative. I like being given something to work with or towards, maybe like planning or architecture? But now I’m not sure where to start. I’m also not sure if my lack of qualifications and education (the whole reason I’m looking for change) will allow me to start or if it has be off on the wrong foot to begin with.
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    I say stick with what you know if your academic background is a bit basic. You say you're a computer hardware engineer. You like logic and a bit of algebra from the sound of it. So computing or may be some type of engineering (electrical and electronic or product ) might suit you. With product/ industrial, someone else might design the item but you make sure it gets built. The OU can certainly help with that.

    Forget architecture. You'd have to do that somewhere else full or part time and there's way too many graduates for too few jobs in that sector.

    Also forget planning. That's my profession. Few graduate jobs for the foreseeable future especially as the profession depends on the ever decreasing local government sector. Interestingly though you can sign up for undergraduate and graduate entry to the RTPI accredited planning MA through the OU and its partner planning schools.

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    Thank you Nitebot, I had though about engineering and even becoming an electrician the problem is I don't know where to start. I'm also unsure what particular avenue to study. I don't have to study at OU it was just an option I was initially looking at. Its also good to hear constructive opinion from someone within the sector when you say forget planning.

    If possible can you please clarify your first paragraph a little in perticular the "So computing or may be some type of engineering (electrical and electronic or product ) might suit you. With product/ industrial, someone else might design the item but you make sure it gets built. The OU can certainly help with that." Im a little lost by the product / industrial statement. Do you meen product and industrial engineering?

    Thanks
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    Sorry I rushed my comments a bit. I was trying to guess what type of engineering you might like. I thought that something like product or industrial engineering might suit you as you stated that you wanted to work to a clear goal.

    I'd guess that nearly all those who do the OU BEng are mechanic/electrician types looking to become professional engineers. But some of us have discussed the degree and think it's strongly biased towards civil /mechanical engineering rather than electrical.

    There might be more suitable part time engineering degrees elsewhere but they might have entry requirements. To do them you'd need to do an access to higher education course (A level equivalent for mature students) in a relevant subject such as engineering at a local college and then go to a campus uni full or part time. All that applies for computing related degrees as well although the OU's computing degrees look well constructed and very flexible. Anyway good luck!

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    Can anybody suggest where to start.
    Lets say my choice is to do some form of engneering where do I begin. How do I know if I should study at OU or somwhere else.
    Id also like to understand further what form of engineering may be best for me, both in terms of somthing that suits me and somthing that is actually required by others or that is in shortage.
    Is there somewhere I can go or somone I can see that may be able to offer help
 
 
 
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