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    What's the difference between chromosomal and DNA mutation? Does DNA mutation involve a few bases only or something?
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    God I did A Level biology and it's only been a year and a half since I finished and I can't remember a thing! :/ I honesty couldn't answer that question!
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    Dna mutation is when the specific order of nucleotides is changed due to radiation and any other chemical mutagen. Chromosome mutation is when a specific gene on the chromosome, very simply and nonscientifically, changes its position. Chromosome aberration is when the no of chromosomes differ as in down, turner, klinefelter, jacobs, patau, edwards or netafemale syndrome.


    P.s. remember that chromosome mutation only in the gamete affects all cells of the future zygote.



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    (Original post by Dynamo123)
    Dna mutation is when the specific order of nucleotides is changed due to radiation and any other chemical mutagen. Chromosome mutation is when a specific gene on the chromosome, very simply and nonscientifically, changes its position. Chromosome aberration is when the no of chromosomes differ as in down, turner, klinefelter, jacobs, patau, edwards or netafemale syndrome.

    P.s. remember that chromosome mutation only in the gamete affects all cells of the future zygote.

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    Oh so DNA mutation is small scale mutation and chromosomal is large scale?

    I have one more question. It says in my book that 'the 2 main classes of DNA mutations are point muations and insertion/ deletion mutations'. Are there any other classes of mutations, as it also mention inversion or repeat of a triplet on the next page? Or does inversion and repeat of triplet go under the 2 main classes?
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    A repeat would count as an insertion, it's just a specific kind of insertion. And inversion is a weird one and much rarer because the sequence that's there hasn't changed, it's just been flipped around. But obviously if that happens in the middle of a gene still prevents the frame from being read.
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    (Original post by Cirsium)
    A repeat would count as an insertion, it's just a specific kind of insertion. And inversion is a weird one and much rarer because the sequence that's there hasn't changed, it's just been flipped around. But obviously if that happens in the middle of a gene still prevents the frame from being read.
    So inversion is rare so isn't really included in the main classes?
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    (Original post by celina10)
    So inversion is rare so isn't really included in the main classes?
    They're not not point mutations or insertions because they are rare: they're not point mutations or insertions because those words mean specific things that don't describe inversions. (E.g. papaya is not not a vegetable or an animal because it's rare: it's not a vegetable or an animal because it just isn't those things!)
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    (Original post by Cirsium)
    They're not not point mutations or insertions because they are rare: they're not point mutations or insertions because those words mean specific things that don't describe inversions. (E.g. papaya is not not a vegetable or an animal because it's rare: it's not a vegetable or an animal because it just isn't those things!)
    Oh I see, thank you

    Can I ask you something? How would a mutation not cause change to an organism if it's in a non coding region of the DNA? Don't non-coding regions of DNA have regulatory functions? Or do some regions of DNA have no function?
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    An inversion would be included in a minor class that constitute chromosomal mutations .

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    (Original post by celina10)
    Oh I see, thank you

    Can I ask you something? How would a mutation not cause change to an organism if it's in a non coding region of the DNA? Don't non-coding regions of DNA have regulatory functions? Or do some regions of DNA have no function?
    Portions of the dna with heterochromatin never expressed their genes and have no major function. A mutation there would go amiss.

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