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Is it rude to correct people's grammar? Watch

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    I was just wondering if it's considered rude to correct grammatical mistakes.

    A woman I work with, for example, always says "between you and I."

    She also makes mistakes in emails, such as "If yourself could give myself a call."

    I never correct her, but it becomes embarrassing when these emails are sent from a shared account. Using "myself" instead of "me" is made more annoying because the person must think they are being very professional in the way they speak, but it sounds ridiculous!
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    Aargh! That would drive me insane! I always want to correct other people's grammar, for example take a cloth and scrub out all those unnecessary apostrophes on shop signs. However I think unless you know someone really well and are able to joke around with them about this sort of thing, it isn't really a socially acceptable thing to do. Depending on her personality she may brush it off as a joke, or even take it into account, but you could end up really offending her. It is a very fine line! Do you get on with her well in other respects?
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    I think in a professional setting you could maybe have a word for serious mistakes, but not if it's something people aren't really going to notice (using a comma where a semicolon should have been). I would just start with one thing at a time (I notice you've put yourself instead of you, just thought you should know), she might thank you for it.
    I also once left a book about grammar mistakes in my bosses place once, because I felt like people were taking her less seriously. I think she thought her PGCE student daughter left it, but she read it and improved a bit.
    If the grammar is so poor that people aren't going to understand, you absolutely correct that.
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    (Original post by HmMusic)
    Aargh! That would drive me insane! I always want to correct other people's grammar, for example take a cloth and scrub out all those unnecessary apostrophes on shop signs. However I think unless you know someone really well and are able to joke around with them about this sort of thing, it isn't really a socially acceptable thing to do. Depending on her personality she may brush it off as a joke, or even take it into account, but you could end up really offending her. It is a very fine line! Do you get on with her well in other respects?
    I do, but I have let it go on so long that I think it would be too awkward to bring up. It would be quite obvious that it has irritated me for a while.

    I might correct certain things, for example, "Her and I went out" because that's easy to explain and easily fixed. Any mistakes she has made in emails, however, are probably best left alone. I'm not looking to embarrass anyone, but you seem to understand my frustration!
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    (Original post by minimarshmallow)
    I also once left a book about grammar mistakes in my bosses place once, because I felt like people were taking her less seriously. I think she thought her PGCE student daughter left it, but she read it and improved a bit.
    If the grammar is so poor that people aren't going to understand, you absolutely correct that.
    That's superb. A questionable tactic, but it served its purpose without being nasty.
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    I would have a quiet word with her line manager, explain you don't want to embarrass your colleague but say you fear that the standard of the communications leaving the office are detrimental to the reputation of the company and reflect badly on the department as a whole. Perhaps a system could be set up where all (her) emails are reviewed before being sent?

    I absolutely DETEST the inappropriate use of the word 'yourself' in this context, it really grinds on my nerves!
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    (Original post by Will's mum)
    I would have a quiet word with her line manager, explain you don't want to embarrass your colleague but say you fear that the standard of the communications leaving the office are detrimental to the reputation of the company and reflect badly on the department as a whole. Perhaps a system could be set up where all (her) emails are reviewed before being sent?

    I absolutely DETEST the inappropriate use of the word 'yourself' in this context, it really grinds on my nerves!
    I can't stand it, but its use is becoming more and more widespread.

    It's terrible when bosses use it and I start to wonder if they think I'm stupid because I don't.
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    It's rude in my opinion to correct them, but it's fine if they make loads of mistakes to inform them of that fact. Correcting them makes it seem as though you think you're more intelligent. It also gets really, really annoying on things like Facebook and Youtube where people correct grammar as a form of arguing, especially when they're incorrect themselves. This just winds me up so much...
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    Yes I absolutely would correct them, but in a quiet and private space. I wouldn't do it in front of others.

    Spelling and grammar mistakes that grate on me include:

    - Saying 'Pacific' instead of 'Specific'
    - Typing 'Defiantly' instead of 'Definitely'

    There are others but those are the two that come to mind.
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    It depends why you're doing it. I often see things written on the side of vans that are incorrect and sometimes I will mention them if I see the owner of the van. I feel that things like that (as it is an advertisement for their business) really do matter, so they would probably appreciate being able to change them. If people make a mistake chatting on TSR or Facebook then I won't mention it.

    That being said, sometimes people will make mistakes with words (like saying "brought" instead of "bought") that I do sometimes point out, but there's a difference in letting people know they're using completely the wrong word than just being picky over something that doesn't really impact on the meaning of what they're saying. I would never say anything to strangers or people who I'm not close friends with. The only exception I can think of for this was when I saw a Facebook status saying "bloody hell, some people's spelling's and grammer are shocking." I couldn't help but point those out.

    I'm sure there are thousands of mistakes in what I've just written. Not necessarily big mistakes, but just perhaps slightly inaccurate syntax or something like that- but you can understand what I'm saying, so in my opinion it doesn't matter too much.
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    (Original post by pane123)
    I was just wondering if it's considered rude to correct grammatical mistakes.

    A woman I work with, for example, always says "between you and I."

    She also makes mistakes in emails, such as "If yourself could give myself a call."

    I never correct her, but it becomes embarrassing when these emails are sent from a shared account. Using "myself" instead of "me" is made more annoying because the person must think they are being very professional in the way they speak, but it sounds ridiculous!
    You need to start putting your quotation marks before your full stops.
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    (Original post by HistoryHistory)
    You need to start putting your quotation marks before your full stops.
    The full stops appeared in the original quotes in the examples I gave.
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    If people do it in front of others or to embarrass them, it shows a lack of class.
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    HistoryHistory is a classic example, he resorts to the grammar wildcard when he has no comeback.
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    (Original post by James A)
    HistoryHistory is a classic example, he resorts to the grammar wildcard when he has no comeback.
    It might make you happy to know that he was incorrect, too.
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    (Original post by pane123)
    That's superb. A questionable tactic, but it served its purpose without being nasty.
    I also kept telling her to just deal with the making of the cakes and I'd email clients, that worked quite well.
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    (Original post by xoxAngel_Kxox)
    It depends why you're doing it. I often see things written on the side of vans that are incorrect and sometimes I will mention them if I see the owner of the van. I feel that things like that (as it is an advertisement for their business) really do matter, so they would probably appreciate being able to change them. If people make a mistake chatting on TSR or Facebook then I won't mention it.

    That being said, sometimes people will make mistakes with words (like saying "brought" instead of "bought") that I do sometimes point out, but there's a difference in letting people know they're using completely the wrong word than just being picky over something that doesn't really impact on the meaning of what they're saying. I would never say anything to strangers or people who I'm not close friends with. The only exception I can think of for this was when I saw a Facebook status saying "bloody hell, some people's spelling's and grammer are shocking." I couldn't help but point those out.

    I'm sure there are thousands of mistakes in what I've just written. Not necessarily big mistakes, but just perhaps slightly inaccurate syntax or something like that- but you can understand what I'm saying, so in my opinion it doesn't matter too much.
    If I did say anything there would be no malice behind my reasons. As you said, I think I'd like to know if I were making mistakes.

    One post I saw on Facebook was "learn to spell people", which I had to comment on.

    Not sure why my original post has received the negative ratings, but this will be the last time I ever start a thread!
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    (Original post by James A)
    HistoryHistory is a classic example, he resorts to the grammar wildcard when he has no comeback.
    Are we participating in a cross-thread grammar tiff? This is exciting!!!
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    (Original post by pane123)
    The full stops appeared in the original quotes in the examples I gave.
    Then you should have put another full stop after the quotation mark.

    Hah! Your grammar is atrocious.
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    (Original post by HistoryHistory)
    Then you should have put another full stop after the quotation mark.

    Hah! Your grammar is atrocious.
    No, you are wrong. The thread wasn't started for an argument.
 
 
 
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