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    Hi i want to be a investment banker . I was wondering where should i apply and what should i study to maximize my chances of becoming a ib. Next year i am doing pe , economics , biology , business studies for A levels my gcse results so far are below .
    maths A
    biology A*
    chemistry A
    physics A
    ict B
    History A
    drama A
    RE C
    English B

    Thanks
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    Why aren't you taking maths?
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    (Original post by Satanel)
    Why aren't you taking maths?
    I didn't really think about im going to try to change 1 subject to maths if i can .
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    Hi,

    Everyone knows you have to study economics mathematics and further mathematics to then be able to study economics at the LSE to secure a job at the Goldman Sachs to switch Citadel 3 years down the road before doing an Harvard MBA and then securing a job at KKR which is the only real path to untold riches.

    Alternatively, you can study at Imperial and then fix trader's computers from 9 to 5 your whole life
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    (Original post by Frenchous)
    Hi,

    Everyone knows you have to study economics mathematics and further mathematics to then be able to study economics at the LSE to secure a job at the Goldman Sachs to switch Citadel 3 years down the road before doing an Harvard MBA and then securing a job at KKR which is the only real path to untold riches.

    Alternatively, you can study at Imperial and then fix trader's computers from 9 to 5 your whole life
    Do i have to study economics though . As i have heard about people who studied sciences , medicine and got into investment banking.
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    (Original post by 511stroker)
    Do i have to study economics though . As i have heard about people who studied sciences , medicine and got into investment banking.
    Banks don't have a preference about what you study at university (or at A-Level but Maths would help you access top universities). It depends on the position though and the university. The less well-respected your university (i.e. not Oxbridge etc) then the more they start to care about the relevance/transferable skills/abilities of your degree. In fairness, Economics isn't an awful lot relevant to banking. It's just a common route and good to have at least some understanding of.

    At your stage, I'd pick: Economics, Maths, a Science and something like Philosophy or History.

    I wouldn't pick Business and Economics together. (Fine at AS but some top universities don't like them together at A2 unless you are taking four subjects, but the banks themselves don't actually mind; the banks have a bias to recruiting from top universities though so it's best to focus your chances on getting accepted there).

    Also, I'd apply for pre-internship programmes at banks, join some extra-curriculars, try and get some leadership experience in some format, voluntary work and maybe some work experience. Also, work real hard at destroying your A-Levels, attend any conferences/networking events and you'll be in a good position.

    If you like P.E. probably better to do sports as an extra-curricular and focus on more traditional academic subjects unless you feel you could do P.E. as an extra on the side AS Level so you would do five; depends on how much you can cope with and your schools time blocks though.

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    (Original post by 511stroker)
    Do i have to study economics though . As i have heard about people who studied sciences , medicine and got into investment banking.
    Yes only economics at the LSE will do
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    (Original post by Frenchous)
    Yes only economics at the LSE will do
    You forgot to tell him that he needs to have done a 6 months volunteer work in a third world country to enhance his CV, otherwise how else will he get the interview at Goldman Sachs
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    (Original post by CoolStoryBroo)
    You forgot to tell him that he needs to have done a 6 months volunteer work in a third world country to enhance his CV, otherwise how else will he get the interview at Goldman Sachs
    Yeah good chat
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    (Original post by will2348)
    Banks don't have a preference about what you study at university (or at A-Level but Maths would help you access top universities). It depends on the position though and the university. The less well-respected your university (i.e. not Oxbridge etc) then the more they start to care about the relevance/transferable skills/abilities of your degree. In fairness, Economics isn't an awful lot relevant to banking. It's just a common route and good to have at least some understanding of.

    At your stage, I'd pick: Economics, Maths, a Science and something like Philosophy or History.

    I wouldn't pick Business and Economics together. (Fine at AS but some top universities don't like them together at A2 unless you are taking four subjects, but the banks themselves don't actually mind; the banks have a bias to recruiting from top universities though so it's best to focus your chances on getting accepted there).

    Also, I'd apply for pre-internship programmes at banks, join some extra-curriculars, try and get some leadership experience in some format, voluntary work and maybe some work experience. Also, work real hard at destroying your A-Levels, attend any conferences/networking events and you'll be in a good position.

    If you like P.E. probably better to do sports as an extra-curricular and focus on more traditional academic subjects unless you feel you could do P.E. as an extra on the side AS Level so you would do five; depends on how much you can cope with and your schools time blocks though.

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    Apart from this reply, pretty much every one of the above is trolling you - probably because you use the word investment banker without specifying a division etc or showing any real knowledge, but fair enough, you're 16 years old. Anyway, you need to focus on getting into a top 10 level university. Do you have any ideas as to the course that you want to study at university? As if we knew this, then it would be a lot easier to suggest some A levels to take and the best ways to get into said universities for said course, which at this point in time is the biggest concern for you.
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    (Original post by Indus)
    Apart from this reply, pretty much every one of the above is trolling you - probably because you use the word investment banker without specifying a division etc or showing any real knowledge, but fair enough, you're 16 years old. Anyway, you need to focus on getting into a top 10 level university. Do you have any ideas as to the course that you want to study at university? As if we knew this, then it would be a lot easier to suggest some A levels to take and the best ways to get into said universities for said course, which at this point in time is the biggest concern for you.

    Hi well ideally i want to work in mergers and acquisitions or private equity im not sure yet . I dont know what i want to study at university . I just want to do something that will maximize my chance .
    thanks
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    (Original post by 511stroker)
    Hi well ideally i want to work in mergers and acquisitions or private equity im not sure yet . I dont know what i want to study at university . I just want to do something that will maximize my chance .
    thanks
    Okay. So M&A is front office; there is a pretty big university bias when hiring into these positions. They target students from Oxford, Cambridge, LSE, Imperial, UCL and Warwick. Some other universities that may be worth looking at as back-up choices, are Durham, Nottingham and Bristol (if you're decent, you can get in from those three; if you're the better side of average, you can get in from the previous six).

    As for what to study, check out the courses that those universities offer. Unless you study something like surf studies or film studies, any stronhg course is fine for entering banking. English, maths, economics, history, biology, chemistry, business management etc etc are all fine. You should look at the requirements for some of the courses you are interested in at these universities, and then choose your A levels roughly around what they want; ie: you may want to do a course that requires maths; so you should choose maths etc. As far as A levels go, any strong ones are fine; I would recommend maths and 3 others personally, although you don't need maths, it's bound to make your life easier at some point in the future (university applications or sometime else).

    It is also useful to add actually, that 99% of your effort needs to be on doing as well as possible in those A levels. You will need around the AAB/ABB level to be competitive when applying to the banks, and you may need higher than this to get into one of the top 6 universities. Aside from working as hard as possible for the next 2 years on those A levels, you should probably spend time learning about banking, apply for some of the insight days offered to A levels students (there is a thread on here somewhere on them), and do one or two extra-curriculars (that you enjoy) both for your personal statement and to fill up the blank space on your CV for spring week applications in the first year of university. You need to be completely focused on doing as well as possible (and ideally achieving As) in those A levels though.
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    (Original post by Indus)
    Okay. So M&A is front office; there is a pretty big university bias when hiring into these positions. They target students from Oxford, Cambridge, LSE, Imperial, UCL and Warwick. Some other universities that may be worth looking at as back-up choices, are Durham, Nottingham and Bristol (if you're decent, you can get in from those three; if you're the better side of average, you can get in from the previous six).

    As for what to study, check out the courses that those universities offer. Unless you study something like surf studies or film studies, any stronhg course is fine for entering banking. English, maths, economics, history, biology, chemistry, business management etc etc are all fine. You should look at the requirements for some of the courses you are interested in at these universities, and then choose your A levels roughly around what they want; ie: you may want to do a course that requires maths; so you should choose maths etc. As far as A levels go, any strong ones are fine; I would recommend maths and 3 others personally, although you don't need maths, it's bound to make your life easier at some point in the future (university applications or sometime else).

    It is also useful to add actually, that 99% of your effort needs to be on doing as well as possible in those A levels. You will need around the AAB/ABB level to be competitive when applying to the banks, and you may need higher than this to get into one of the top 6 universities. Aside from working as hard as possible for the next 2 years on those A levels, you should probably spend time learning about banking, apply for some of the insight days offered to A levels students (there is a thread on here somewhere on them), and do one or two extra-curriculars (that you enjoy) both for your personal statement and to fill up the blank space on your CV for spring week applications in the first year of university. You need to be completely focused on doing as well as possible (and ideally achieving As) in those A levels though.
    Ok thanks
 
 
 
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