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    Quick question really, in edexcel a level maths is using the multiplication dot okay?


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    (Original post by BarryIsMyName)
    Quick question really, in edexcel a level maths is using the multiplication dot okay?

    hmmmmmmm

    Not sure if I would advise it

    It is standard notation but my concern would be twofold

    1. writing it consistently clearly
    2. the observation skills of a tired examiner looking at a computer scheme


    Why do you prefer it?
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    I expect so. If I were an examiner I'd actually prefer it, as it's easy to get a cross confused with an x with some peoples handwriting. Just make sure you always use the right sign when it comes to vectors.
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    Basically what the guy above said, my handwriting is a bit shabby and some cases when a lot of things are getting multiplied I think it looks a bit clearer. Ill ask my teachers see what they think on Monday.


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    (Original post by BarryIsMyName)
    Quick question really, in edexcel a level maths is using the multiplication dot okay?
    Yes. They encourage it in favour of \times (as does everybody!)
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    (Original post by Jkn)
    Yes. They encourage it in favour of \times (as does everybody!)
    Where does this information come from

    Not the spec or marking schemes
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    (Original post by TenOfThem)
    x
    The "times" symbol is typically only used when you've got actual numbers e.g. 2 \times 3 (though this is still unnecessary and can often lead to confusion, e.g. \frac{2 \times x}{2x})

    The "dot" is typically used for clarity. In algebra you have ab and similarly (2)(3) is the most common form once you get past GCSE. Think of the dot as a simple extension of this notation. e.g. to clarify, if you reaaaaally wanted to, you could put (2).(3) and they would know what you mean within the context of the question. The only danger is confusing it with the "dot product", though taking the dot product of two 1x1 matrices is equivalent to multiplication so there will be no real problem
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    (Original post by Jkn)
    ...
    I know what the notation is used for

    I want to know where the information you gave regarding Edexcel promoting the use of it comes from
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    (Original post by TenOfThem)
    I know what the notation is used for

    I want to know where the information you gave regarding Edexcel promoting the use of it comes from
    Well... doesn't the explanation of when it is used make it obvious?

    My sources are: my teacher who has been teaching it for god knows how long, my exam scores (if I had marks deducted for using a dot I would have realised by now) and I think I've seen it in mark schemes (though I may be wrong)

    Besides, it's standard notation. They have accept it
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    (Original post by Jkn)
    Well... doesn't the explanation of when it is used make it obvious?

    My sources are: my teacher who has been teaching it for god knows how long, my exam scores (if I had marks deducted for using a dot I would have realised by now) and I think I've seen it in mark schemes (though I may be wrong)

    Besides, it's standard notation. They have accept it


    You misunderstand what I am asking .... of course they cannot mark it wrong if it is clearly used

    You specifically stated that they encouraged it

    I was asking you where in the spec or mark schemes you have taken this information from ... but, as you say, this is simply what you have been told ... perhaps your teacher is an Edexcel marker
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    I doubt there are any official guidelines for this kind of thing. The examiners are human and I'm sure will be familiar with either notation. I expect \times will come out better when they photocopy your paper though.
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    (Original post by Jkn)
    similarly (2)(3) is the most common form once you get past GCSE.
    What? This is just asking to be confused with the notation for principal ideals.
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    (Original post by TenOfThem)
    perhaps your teacher is an Edexcel marker
    She used to be
    (Original post by electriic_ink)
    What? This is just asking to be confused with the notation for principal ideals.
    Well, this is the most useful notation whenever you actually need to write numbers down (any arithmetic should be emitted from a written solution at this level (i.e. calculator or margin)). The exception being irrational numbers that cannot be split, which do not need multiplication symbols as they are all either represented by algebraic symbols or should be isolated in brackets or radix symbols anyway in order to avoid confusion (e.g. (2)^{\frac{1}{3}}).

    The only cases where you will have to write down actual numbers in the presentation of a solution would be in things like the binomial theorem. In this case it is obvious to write things inside brackets because, when and if you want to represent it as an infinite series (finding the nth term), it will show things in a more logical form.

    I fail to see how writing things in brackets is confusing? The use of brackets is synonymous with clarity.
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    (Original post by Jkn)
    She used to be

    Well, this is the most useful notation whenever you actually need to write numbers down (any arithmetic should be emitted from a written solution at this level (i.e. calculator or margin)). The exception being irrational numbers that cannot be split, which do not need multiplication symbols as they are all either represented by algebraic symbols or should be isolated in brackets or radix symbols anyway in order to avoid confusion (e.g. (2)^{\frac{1}{3}}).

    The only cases where you will have to write down actual numbers in the presentation of a solution would be in things like the binomial theorem. In this case it is obvious to write things inside brackets because, when and if you want to represent it as an infinite series (finding the nth term), it will show things in a more logical form.

    I fail to see how writing things in brackets is confusing? The use of brackets is synonymous with clarity.
    In various areas (that you're unlikely to encounter at school level) brackets are used around single elements to indicate things other than that element; one example is the use of the notation (a) to refer to the equivalence class containing a, or as mentioned above the principal ideal generated by a.

    If I saw regular scalars written in brackets (like your (2)(3) and (2)^\frac{1}{3} examples) I'd assume there was some special reason for them to be in brackets; for what you mean I'd expect to see 2 \cdot 3, 2.3 or 2 \times 3, depending on which was clearest in context (and 2^\frac{1}{3}, for which your brackets don't avoid any confusion at all).
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    (Original post by dbmag9)
    In various areas (that you're unlikely to encounter at school level) brackets are used around single elements to indicate things other than that element; one example is the use of the notation (a) to refer to the equivalence class containing a, or as mentioned above the principal ideal generated by a.

    If I saw regular scalars written in brackets (like your (2)(3) and (2)^\frac{1}{3} examples) I'd assume there was some special reason for them to be in brackets; for what you mean I'd expect to see 2 \cdot 3, 2.3 or 2 \times 3, depending on which was clearest in context (and 2^\frac{1}{3}, for which your brackets don't avoid any confusion at all).
    \frac{1}{3} \times 2^{\frac{1}{3}} or \frac{1}{3}(2)^{\frac{1}{3}} or \frac{1}{3}2^{\frac{1}{3}}

    If you were choosing a final form with which to leave your answer, I believe it is clear that the "times" symbol is rather inappropriate

    I think it's reasonable to assume that you are not referring to abstract areas of set theory when using simple notation. At points of overlap, you would, of course, need to exercise caution, but you surely must agree that brackets are very useful!

    As I said above, there are very few situations that would warrant the use of such notation anyway. Do you really think someone is going to "immediately assume" you are talking about principle ideals when writing out each term of an infinite sum?
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    (Original post by Jkn)
    \frac{1}{3} \times 2^{\frac{1}{3}} or \frac{1}{3}(2)^{\frac{1}{3}} or \frac{1}{3}2^{\frac{1}{3}}

    If you were choosing a final form with which to leave your answer, I believe it is clear that the "times" symbol is rather inappropriate

    I think it's reasonable to assume that you are not referring to abstract areas of set theory when using simple notation. At points of overlap, you would, of course, need to exercise caution, but you surely must agree that brackets are very useful!

    As I said above, there are very few situations that would warrant the use of such notation anyway. Do you really think someone is going to "immediately assume" you are talking about principle ideals when writing out each term of an infinite sum?
    \frac{2^\frac{1}{3}}{3} no good then? :p: Out of the options you've written I probably would go with the times sign.

    But I don't have that much of a problem with using brackets like that, it just would look quite odd to me in some cases. And examiners will almost certainly have done a maths degree, so you want answers to be in the form most obviously correct to them, whatever the situation.
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    I think that dot's should be fine. I, however, usually use an asterisk.
    I.e 6x*\dfrac{4cosx}{e^i^\pi} = 6x \times  \dfrac{4cosx}{e^i^\pi}
 
 
 
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