NOSE JOB (Rhinoplasty) on the NHS. Desperate :( Watch

xxm
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#61
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#61
(Original post by arnoob)
Yes it does, stop lying, you're doing it for beauty purposes.

Guys, I know this guy, the only reason why he wants a nose job is not because he needs one, but rather because his father keeps on teasing him about a huge nose.

Instead of a nose job, he requires a psychiatrist to show him that it's alright to have a big nose.
What a gimp hehehehe
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username818763
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#62
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#62
(Original post by xxm)
What a gimp hehehehe
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FrankyGuy
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#63
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#63
Your logic is flawed. Just because you decided to pay for it (or indeed the Bank of Mum and Dad in your case) doesn't mean that this treatment should not be available on the NHS for people who need it. To say that the OP's parents should pay is remarkable to say the least considering you do not know them. As for others who say the NHS is already short of resources then I say this; anyone who hasn't paid into the NHS for five years and was not born in this country should NOT get free-to-them treatment on the NHS. NHS treatment is not free at all, it is paid for by hard working tax payers of the UK.
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iJess
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#64
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#64
You'll be offered counselling but I think its selfish to have cosmetic surgery on the NHS if you weren't in an accident or something. My nose is awful just as you describe it gets me down because its the first thing I and others see, but I'm going to save myself to get rhinoplasty, I'd feel awful using NHS money when that money could be needed for someone else, I'd feel much better paying myself.
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SloaneRanger
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#65
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#65
Just get a loan and get it done why moan about it
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Stony Owner
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#66
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(Original post by mollie-)
I've tried just accepting myself. It's not working
Please list what you have actively done to accept yourself as you are.

If you were "trying" to accept yourself then I'm not surprised you failed. "Try" implies failure. When you "try" to open a door you're presupposing struggle, difficulty and probably failure, too. So for a start I would question your conceptualizations here.

"It's not working" - this is a belief that probably becomes a self-fulling prophecy, too. If you tell yourself "it's not working" how do you expect to change?!

You say "JUST" accepting yourself - "JUST"? Accepting yourself is everything here!

Change isn't a five minute job...if you made a commitment to actually change then I'm sure it would happen eventually, after doing all different kinds of things and applying all different perspectives to it.

The solution isn't a free nose job at all, well not if you would prefer not to have your self-worth tied to specific aspects of your physical appearance, anyway.

So what CAN you do? Notice your language and conceptualizations and see if you can make ones that better serve you...making an ACTIVE inner commitment to change and catching yourself out when you say things like "I'm trying". Switch stuff like that to "I'm WORKING ON this change, however long it takes I will get there eventually, I'm sure of it!". This would be a much more useful way of seeing things if you want change.

And I said it up there really: "if you made a commitment to actually change then I'm sure it would happen eventually, after doing all different kinds of things and applying all different perspectives to it."

All best.
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thisistheend
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(Original post by Stony Owner)
Please list what you have actively done to accept yourself as you are.

If you were "trying" to accept yourself then I'm not surprised you failed. "Try" implies failure. When you "try" to open a door you're presupposing struggle, difficulty and probably failure, too. So for a start I would question your conceptualizations here.

"It's not working" - this is a belief that probably becomes a self-fulling prophecy, too. If you tell yourself "it's not working" how do you expect to change?!

You say "JUST" accepting yourself - "JUST"? Accepting yourself is everything here!

Change isn't a five minute job...if you made a commitment to actually change then I'm sure it would happen eventually, after doing all different kinds of things and applying all different perspectives to it.

The solution isn't a free nose job at all, well not if you would prefer not to have your self-worth tied to specific aspects of your physical appearance, anyway.

So what CAN you do? Notice your language and conceptualizations and see if you can make ones that better serve you...making an ACTIVE inner commitment to change and catching yourself out when you say things like "I'm trying". Switch stuff like that to "I'm WORKING ON this change, however long it takes I will get there eventually, I'm sure of it!". This would be a much more useful way of seeing things if you want change.

And I said it up there really: "if you made a commitment to actually change then I'm sure it would happen eventually, after doing all different kinds of things and applying all different perspectives to it."

All best.
Look, you can have hours and hours of wishy washy "therapy" in an attempt to convince you that the nose isn't ugly.

Or you can shell out a couple k and actually fix the damn thing. problem solved.
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Stony Owner
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(Original post by thisistheend)
Look, you can have hours and hours of wishy washy "therapy" in an attempt to convince you that the nose isn't ugly.

Or you can shell out a couple k and actually fix the damn thing. problem solved.
1. Lasting change often does take time and effort but is worthwhile.
2. Nobody is suggesting "therapy" - I'm certainly not.
3. You're falling into the truth trap here and believing a nose can be "ugly" without an observer to decide it is so. It's not an objective 'fact' that something is 'ugly', 'beautiful' etc. Those are humanly applied descriptions - and in fact they are impositions of certain concepts onto physical features (such as noses, which we choose to delineate from faces).
4. "Convince" - what a terrible word. If you're "attempting" to "convince" yourself of stuff then no way you'll believe it. That kind of crummy conceptualization is completely unhelpful. Again here you're making it sound like there's some "truth" behind what the nose looks like. Not true at all. "Who's the magician that makes the grass green?" - it's us as human beings.
5. A physical solution is absolutely possible and I'm not overly against it, but the belief you "need" a nose job comes with a pretty horrible side-affect that your self worth ends up tied to your physical appearance. Do you want that? If you do that's fine. I don't, I'm not interested in that. If I suffered irreparable physical damage from a fire or something, I wouldn't want to feel suicidal or awful because my appearance would be judged by me as being inferior. I would still want to feel fine and empowered. In fact I would ALWAYS like to feel that way so I don't see how physical solutions are that helpful. What if you later on down the line end up with some irreparable problem?

Is the best way out of depression to attempt physical solutions (drugs, drink, self-harm, maybe anti-depressants and other drugs) or is it to actually rejig the ways you're making meaning in your mind and using your body that's resulting in depression in the first place? If you're me it would definitely be the latter. Why? Because those physical solutions are unreliable, don't usually work, too temporary etc. This might be a slightly different situation from those perspectives but still doesn't seem that useful to be tied down in that way to me.

Remember - MY biases. But they are serving me right now. Are your biases towards physical solutions serving you? Maybe they are, in which case of course I'm not going to suggest you consider changing them. But if some of my points here resonate...well, there you go.

Ultimately it's quite obviously down to the OP here. But they want it free on the NHS, not to shell out some money. That's what pisses me off.
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hslt
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#69
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(Original post by thisistheend)
Look, you can have hours and hours of wishy washy "therapy" in an attempt to convince you that the nose isn't ugly.

Or you can shell out a couple k and actually fix the damn thing. problem solved.
It's called BDD.

Nose isn't ugly, nobody else notices it, and as soon as that is fixed the person will just fixate on something else. Face it - there is no way that their nose is worse than 1000s or even millions of other people's noses, ears, or whatever, and very few of them have this effect on their life.

Nor would the therapy be several hours of telling you your nose isn't ugly.

The problem isn't therefore the nose, nor will fixing the nose help anything else, it will just lead to a different symptom of the same, untreated condition.
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Laura1990x
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#70
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I think ur post is absolutely ridiculous! And you have not helped this girl in any way at all, probably just made her feel worse! After an accident when I was young I have a disfigured nose and I am also considering trying this option as it is affecting my life so much! If u don't have anything nce to say don't say anything at all!!
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stephaniemariec
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#71
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It's a tough one this as both points of view are valid. If this girl is having serious mental health problems because of her nose, I think she should be able to have it done on the nhs if she cannot afford it. As stated in a previous comment, fat/obese people have surgery on the nhs and alot of them STILL eat like utter ****! Alcoholics that receive treatment for liver failure, smokers getting treatment for cancer etc. Now you may say
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STARFLEET
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#72
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(Original post by stephaniemariec)
It's a tough one this as both points of view are valid. If this girl is having serious mental health problems because of her nose, I think she should be able to have it done on the nhs if she cannot afford it. As stated in a previous comment, fat/obese people have surgery on the nhs and alot of them STILL eat like utter ****! Alcoholics that receive treatment for liver failure, smokers getting treatment for cancer etc. Now you may say
Disagree.

'Fat/obese' people have surgery on the NHS because it's potentially life threatening, same for alcoholics.

Not liking the shape of your nose is not going to 'kill' you.

In this case, therapy may be more appropriate.
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h3isenberg
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#73
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(Original post by Laura1990x)
I think ur post is absolutely ridiculous! And you have not helped this girl in any way at all, probably just made her feel worse! After an accident when I was young I have a disfigured nose and I am also considering trying this option as it is affecting my life so much! If u don't have anything nce to say don't say anything at all!!
That's different, as you stated, you had an accident which changed the shape of your nose (I'm assuming it was/is broken). Then you have a medical reason for wanting a rhinoplasty.
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gd.1
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#74
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I totally understand how you feel. I can relate so much. I really hope you get the chance to have it done on the NHS, if not CBT may help you with your problems. Im in a very similar situation myself (I have posted a thread about it) and would be really grateful if you could keep me updated with how it goes for you. Thanks x
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chloeg333
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#75
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I don't know if you are still wanting one but i have had two on the nhs - it is very easy i went in said i can't breathe properly through one side (which is true) and had one which was awful a septoplasty and much worse than my original nose and then my second a few years later is better but still not perfect and i am still embarrassed of it and wanting a third. the nhs free operations for breathing problems don't really care about the cosmetic side of it so i would recommend saying how depressed you are or trying to save. My surgon has done amazing work for his private clients but for me a good job on the second but it has still collapsed a bit etc.
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mezabby💋👩
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#76
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Yeah u can I've had it twice on nhs second time was cuz i got In a fight one week after it got done. I'm totally happy with myself and again :-) my prob was got bitten with my aunts dog but still get some probz afterwards of course but worth it as beautiful needs pain right?😜👩🙌
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Skylapops
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#77
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You truly are a sad sac aren't you....We all pay towards the national health service and should be able to use all of its available services.
I'm going to try to get mine done on the nhs as it was damaged when I got attacked and now I'm missing a big bit of bone in the centre of my nose....hope your disgusted....p's I really don't give a hoot what u think sad sac
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Gemlee89
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#78
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I can relate to this. My sternum is blocking one of my nostrils and I struggle to breath at night which is affecting my sleep. Do you think I should consult my gp as it is really starting to annoy me now. I know I have broken it once or twice due to my own clumsiness, I don't particularly dislike my nose it's just badly affecting my breathing
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TheCynicalOne
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This isn't advice on how to get your surgery funded by the NHS, but private hospitals may offer finance on the treatments. For instance, BMI can loan up to £20,000 with no interest for 12 months. And no, I am not speaking from personal experience!
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Cll_ws
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(Original post by Gemlee89)
I can relate to this. My sternum is blocking one of my nostrils and I struggle to breath at night which is affecting my sleep. Do you think I should consult my gp as it is really starting to annoy me now. I know I have broken it once or twice due to my own clumsiness, I don't particularly dislike my nose it's just badly affecting my breathing
That's exactly the problem I had, well... still have (Presuming you meant septum )

I recieved corrective surgery on the NHS, but not long afterwards my septum returned to its pre-op position. I really need to go back and get it sorted out, it's been about 2 years.
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