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Do you think Farage's Scotland visit was ill-judged? Watch

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    So things have just got worst for Farage although both sides have been distasteful. The protestors outside that pub were aggressive and nasty towards Farage. Yet this morning he just makes it worse by labelling certain elements of a legitimate, majority party in Holyrood, the SNP, as fascists and putting the phone down on the interviewer, asking perfectly legitimate questions. I'm not a fan of Alex Salmond and don't subscribe to his politics but he got it right this morning when he said Farage seems to have lost the plot.

    My question was his visit ill-judged? Farage claims that he and UKIP can be an important political voice in Scotland, yet that's clearly not the case currently and isn't likely to change anytime soon. They came 6th in the European elections in Scotland and considering the naturally left wing nature of Scotland, a right wing populist party like UKIP is never going to be popular.

    I can see the point of visiting to improve his image and try combat the idea that UKIP is an England only party. But was it an ill-judged visit, should Farage just stay out of Scotland altogether?
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    It was most certainly ill-judged. It would be like letting giving a lecture on communism on the streets of Dallas in Texas.
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    The most ill-judged aspect was his location - go to Scotland to promote your Aberdeen Donside candidate in Edingburgh. Hate to break it to you Farage - Aberdeen's the other end of Scotland.
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    (Original post by The Mad Dog)
    The most ill-judged aspect was his location - go to Scotland to promote your Aberdeen Donside candidate in Edingburgh. Hate to break it to you Farage - Aberdeen's the other end of Scotland.
    I didn't know that. It makes the whole thing so much worse.
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    (Original post by The Mad Dog)
    The most ill-judged aspect was his location - go to Scotland to promote your Aberdeen Donside candidate in Edingburgh. Hate to break it to you Farage - Aberdeen's the other end of Scotland.
    He was starting his campaign at the Scottish Parliament, which just happened to be less than a mile from the Canons Gait.

    I don't think it was misjudged, still plenty of conservatives in Scotland despite poor right wing electoral performance. You don't get anywhere by just sitting on your back all day, UKIP have to take the initiative in all parts of the country.

    And I'm sorry, but the interviewer on Good Morning Scotland, what a **** stain. The questions were very aggressive and hatred fuelled. The BBC showing its true colours as ever.
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    I've always thought UKIP and the SNP had a lot in common. Nationalistic independence movements based on emotive arguments. Farage likes a drink too, so should have a lot in common with the locals.
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    Scottish nationalist movement showing its true colours & hatred of people south of the border
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    I don't like the SNP, but nor do I like UKIP. Nigel Farage is a complete and utter ****.

    (Original post by Cannotbelieveit)
    And I'm sorry, but the interviewer on Good Morning Scotland, what a **** stain. The questions were very aggressive and hatred fuelled. The BBC showing its true colours as ever.
    Not really...

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    UKIP gets its support by creating or highlighting common enemies. Immigrants, the EU, the political establishment. He helps turn people against them, speaks out against them and thus appears to be on the same wavelength as the public.

    So...he went to Scotland, tells everyone in England that the Scottish hate the English, and then speaks out against the Scottish nationalists. Look - he's on the side of the English! Let's vote for him!

    So no, I think his visit was perfectly judged. Farage is a pretty astute guy, he must know full well that UKIP has absolutely no chance in Scotland. There is no other region in the country so positive about the EU and so committed to social liberalism. As if he thought a eurosceptic, socially conservative party - viewed as a more extreme version of the Tories - could have a chance in Scotland. So this suggests his visit was not really an attempt to continue UKIP success across the border. It was an attempt to get on the news and play the 'English are victims' card.
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    (Original post by Pembleton)
    So things have just got worst for Farage although both sides have been distasteful. The protestors outside that pub were aggressive and nasty towards Farage. Yet this morning he just makes it worse by labelling certain elements of a legitimate, majority party in Holyrood, the SNP, as fascists and putting the phone down on the interviewer, asking perfectly legitimate questions. I'm not a fan of Alex Salmond and don't subscribe to his politics but he got it right this morning when he said Farage seems to have lost the plot.
    Farage didn't call the SNP fascists, he called some within the Nationalist movement fascistic. Which is, in fact, very true - the fringe nationalist organisations, like the ones that organised this protest, are very close to it.

    Having had racist and vile chants thrown at you just hours before, I don't think anyone would be particularly in the mood to humour a BBC Radio Scotland presenter who appeared to be pushing the same rubbish agenda as the protesters. Interestingly, the interview was recorded in the evening after all this, it wasn't live when it was broadcast the next morning.

    My question was his visit ill-judged? Farage claims that he and UKIP can be an important political voice in Scotland, yet that's clearly not the case currently and isn't likely to change anytime soon. They came 6th in the European elections in Scotland and considering the naturally left wing nature of Scotland, a right wing populist party like UKIP is never going to be popular.
    This stuff about Scotland being naturally left wing is a myth. UKIP doesn't do too well in Scotland because we already have a populist nationalist party cornering that sort of nutter market. Can it do well here? Yes, potentially - and that's why the SNP are terrified. Particularly after the referendum next year. I doubt they'll get one of our six MEPs in the Euro elections, but they'll definitely improve their vote share, I'd guess.
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    (Original post by The Mad Dog)
    The most ill-judged aspect was his location - go to Scotland to promote your Aberdeen Donside candidate in Edingburgh. Hate to break it to you Farage - Aberdeen's the other end of Scotland.
    I absolutely disagree. He held it in the late afternoon, in a pub, five minute's walk away from Scotland's political press base in Holyrood. As such, it had an enormous turnout, with all of Scotland's main political journalists present.

    During the week few of them could've travelled to Aberdeen due to their Edinburgh commitments, and at the weekend few would've bothered. In terms of coverage - even had there been no protest - it was a masterstroke.

    (Original post by Llamageddon)
    I've always thought UKIP and the SNP had a lot in common. Nationalistic independence movements based on emotive arguments.
    That's what scares them. Indeed, they've been pinching each other's lines for a while now: all this "civic nationalism" rubbish. At least UKIP are consistent in their nationalism. The SNP have yet to explain why being governed by Westminster is an affront, yet being governed by Brussels is fine. They've also yet to point out why they believe there should be a referendum on Scottish independence, but are outspoken in their opposition to a referendum on the EU. This is despite withdrawal from the EU polling ahead of withdrawal from Britain.

    Anyway, the comparison was well drawn earlier this month in an article by David Torrance-- http://www.thinkscotland.org/todays-...ead_full=12133
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    UKIP should persevere because they could get many votes in Scotland from those who do not want independence and are fed up with tories and labour
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    (Original post by L i b)
    Farage didn't call the SNP fascists, he called some within the Nationalist movement fascistic. Which is, in fact, very true - the fringe nationalist organisations, like the ones that organised this protest, are very close to it.

    Having had racist and vile chants thrown at you just hours before, I don't think anyone would be particularly in the mood to humour a BBC Radio Scotland presenter who appeared to be pushing the same rubbish agenda as the protesters. Interestingly, the interview was recorded in the evening after all this, it wasn't live when it was broadcast the next morning.

    This stuff about Scotland being naturally left wing is a myth. UKIP doesn't do too well in Scotland because we already have a populist nationalist party cornering that sort of nutter market. Can it do well here? Yes, potentially - and that's why the SNP are terrified. Particularly after the referendum next year. I doubt they'll get one of our six MEPs in the Euro elections, but they'll definitely improve their vote share, I'd guess.
    That's why I said he called certain elements of the SNP fascists, rather than the SNP itself. The interviewer asked perfectly legitimate questions. If you're going to stump for votes in Scotland then it's fair you should be asked questions about Scottish politics. I thought UKIP welcomed tough questions.

    I honestly don't think UKIP will do well in Scotland. It is more left wing, clearly you're not, (I'm assuming you're from Scotland by what you've described), but overall it is. Scotland is more open to immigration in the way England, Wales, NI aren't. UKIP just don't play well there, especially when people actually realise what their policies are.
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    (Original post by Pembleton)


    That's why I said he called certain elements of the SNP fascists, rather than the SNP itself. The interviewer asked perfectly legitimate questions. If you're going to stump for votes in Scotland then it's fair you should be asked questions about Scottish politics. I thought UKIP welcomed tough questions.

    I honestly don't think UKIP will do well in Scotland. It is more left wing, clearly you're not, (I'm assuming you're from Scotland by what you've described), but overall it is. Scotland is more open to immigration in the way England, Wales, NI aren't. UKIP just don't play well there, especially when people actually realise what their policies are.

    I'd say it used to be left wing, but that's dieing out a bit. In fact it gives the impression it's left wing because of the vocal nature of the hard left. He who shouts loudest isn't normally right. You just need to look at the SNP for that. They're very loud but still have a minority support fir their cause.

    I think its good that we've got another political party in Scotland that's anti EU as it gives voters a choice. It'll be interesting though as until recently the SNP were pushing fir Scotland's removal from the EU.
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    (Original post by L i b)
    I absolutely disagree. He held it in the late afternoon, in a pub, five minute's walk away from Scotland's political press base in Holyrood. As such, it had an enormous turnout, with all of Scotland's main political journalists present.

    During the week few of them could've travelled to Aberdeen due to their Edinburgh commitments, and at the weekend few would've bothered. In terms of coverage - even had there been no protest - it was a masterstroke.
    Except UKIP is renowned for running massive ground campaigns in the constituency they are running for and courting the voters rather than the press, The fact he didn't in this case indicates he doesn't see a by-election to the Scottish Parliament as worthy of the same effort as a by-election to Westminster - whilst probably true it's not an attitude that's going to help UKIP break through north of the border giving that the majority of Scots support further devolution but not independence.
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    (Original post by The Mad Dog)
    Except UKIP is renowned for running massive ground campaigns in the constituency they are running for and courting the voters rather than the press, The fact he didn't in this case indicates he doesn't see a by-election to the Scottish Parliament as worthy of the same effort as a by-election to Westminster - whilst probably true it's not an attitude that's going to help UKIP break through north of the border giving that the majority of Scots support further devolution but not independence.
    You're not going to be able to run a campaign without media awareness. As Lib has pointed out the Scottish political Media is based in Edinburgh.

    You seem to forget, we have a population less than London, so there's hardly a huge disconnect starting a campaign in Edinburgh and then moving it to Aberdeen.
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    (Original post by MatureStudent36)
    I'd say it used to be left wing, but that's dieing out a bit. In fact it gives the impression it's left wing because of the vocal nature of the hard left. He who shouts loudest isn't normally right. You just need to look at the SNP for that. They're very loud but still have a minority support fir their cause.

    I think its good that we've got another political party in Scotland that's anti EU as it gives voters a choice. It'll be interesting though as until recently the SNP were pushing fir Scotland's removal from the EU.
    It's true that the more left wing are more vocal in Scotland, but they are still more left wing than the rest of the UK and that doesn't look set to change anytime soon.
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    (Original post by Pembleton)
    It's true that the more left wing are more vocal in Scotland, but they are still more left wing than the rest of the UK and that doesn't look set to change anytime soon.
    Doesn't it? In the last few years we've seen UKIP make huge gains south of the border.

    Scotland used to be a strong Tory base, but there's a lot of Scots who won't vote for the only right wing party, the conservatives, just because of the fact that they're the conservative party. So you have a large number of Scots who tend to the right, but don't have anybody to represent their views as they won't vote for the only right party. That's where I think UKIP have the potential to make gains.

    And let's be completely honest, even in the Tory strongholds of the South East, nobody's calling for a complete ban on welfare and healthcare spending. The just want those services delivered in a more efficient, cost effective measure and in such a way that it actually pays to work, and not what we have at the moment of a position where you can actually earn more by not working.
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    (Original post by MatureStudent36)
    Doesn't it? In the last few years we've seen UKIP make huge gains south of the border.

    Scotland used to be a strong Tory base, but there's a lot of Scots who won't vote for the only right wing party, the conservatives, just because of the fact that they're the conservative party. So you have a large number of Scots who tend to the right, but don't have anybody to represent their views as they won't vote for the only right party. That's where I think UKIP have the potential to make gains.

    And let's be completely honest, even in the Tory strongholds of the South East, nobody's calling for a complete ban on welfare and healthcare spending. The just want those services delivered in a more efficient, cost effective measure and in such a way that it actually pays to work, and not what we have at the moment of a position where you can actually earn more by not working.
    I wouldn't go as far as to say Scotland used to be a Tory base, the Tories were much more popular there though. UKIP may make some gains in the European elections but I doubt anywhere else.

    I'm pretty sure the vast majority of Scots know that the Tories don't actually want to ban welfare and destroy the NHS, but they're still not enamoured of the Conservative party.
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    (Original post by Pembleton)
    I wouldn't go as far as to say Scotland used to be a Tory base, the Tories were much more popular there though. UKIP may make some gains in the European elections but I doubt anywhere else.

    I'm pretty sure the vast majority of Scots know that the Tories don't actually want to ban welfare and destroy the NHS, but they're still not enamoured of the Conservative party.
    Which is where I think UKIP may be able to make ground, and annoy the SNP by being seen as another protest vote that will only weaken the SNPs support.
 
 
 
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