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    B554 - Animal Welfare (Amendment) Bill 2013, TSR Green Party


    An Act enhancing the protection of animals in the UK.

    BE IT ENACTED by The Queen's most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Commons in this present Parliament assembled, in accordance with the provisions of the Parliament Acts 1911 and 1949, and by the authority of the same, as follows:-

    Part I: Animals to which this Act applies

    1. Part 1. (1) of the Animal Welfare Act 2006 (AWA) is replaced with the following: "In this Act, except subsections (4) and (5), 'animal' means a living creature which is eukaryotic, multicellular, heterotrophic, generally digests food in an internal chamber, lacking in rigid cell walls and with embryos that pass through a blastula stages. For the purposes of this Act, both vertebrates and invertebrates are included within the definition of 'animal'."

    2. Parts 1. (2), (3) (a) and (3) (b) of the AWA are deleted.

    Part II: Prohibition of Racing etc.

    1. Subsequent to Part 8. "Fighting, etc.," insert the following part:

    1. A person commits an offence if he—
    (a) causes an animal race to take place, or attempts to do so;
    (b) knowingly receives money for admission to an animal race;
    (c) knowingly publicises a proposed animal race;
    (d) provides information about an animal race to another with the intention of enabling or encouraging attendance at the race;
    (e) makes or accepts a bet on the outcome of an animal race or on the likelihood of anything occurring or not occurring in the course of an animal race;
    (f) takes part in an animal race;
    (g) has in his possession anything designed or adapted for use in connection with an animal race with the intention of its being so used;
    (h) keeps or trains an animal for use for in connection with an animal race;
    (i) keeps any premises for use for an animal race.

    2. A person commits an offence if, without lawful authority or reasonable excuse, he is present at an animal race.

    3. A person commits an offence if, without lawful authority or reasonable excuse, he—
    (a) knowingly supplies a video recording of an animal race,
    (b) knowingly publishes a video recording of an animal race,
    (c) knowingly shows a video recording of an animal race to another, or
    (d) possesses a video recording of an animal race, knowing it to be such a recording, with the intention of supplying it.

    4. Subsection (3) does not apply if the video recording is of an animal race that took place—
    (a) outside Great Britain, or
    (b) before the commencement date.

    5. Subsection (3) does not apply—
    (a) in the case of paragraph (a), to the supply of a video recording for inclusion in a programme service;
    (b) in the case of paragraph (b) or (c), to the publication or showing of a video recording by means of its inclusion in a programme service;
    (c) in the case of paragraph (d), by virtue of intention to supply for inclusion in a programme service.

    6. Provision extending the application of an offence under subsection (3), so far as relating to the provision of information society services, may be made under section 2(2) of the European Communities Act 1972 (c. 68) powers to implement Community obligations by regulations) notwithstanding the limits imposed by paragraph 1(1)(d) of Schedule 2 to that Act on the penalties with which an offence may be punishable on summary conviction.

    7. In this section—
    “animal race” means an occasion on which a protected animal is placed with one or more animals, or with a human, for the purpose of racing;
    “information society services” has the meaning given in Article 2(a) of Directive 2000/31/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 8 June 2000 on certain legal aspects of information society services, in particular electronic commerce in the Internal Market (Directive on electronic commerce);
    “programme service” has the same meaning as in the Communications Act 2003 (c. 21);
    “video recording” means a recording, in any form, from which a moving image may by any means be reproduced and includes data stored on a computer disc or by other electronic means which is capable of conversion into a moving image.

    8. In this section—
    (a) references to supplying or publishing a video recording are to supplying or publishing a video recording in any manner, including, in relation to a video recording in the form of data stored electronically, by means of transmitting such data;
    (b) references to showing a video recording are to showing a moving image reproduced from a video recording by any means.
    Part III: Commencement, short title and extent

    1. This Act may be cited as the Animal Welfare (Amendment) Act 2013.
    2. This Act shall extend to the United Kingdom.
    3. This Act shall come in to force immediately following Royal Assent.


    NotesLink to the RL Animal Welfare Act 2006.

    Year after year, horses and other animals die racing at the orders of their owners. While the British Horseracing Authority claims that equine welfare is of paramount importance, in reality there is only so much that can be done. Some suggest that a reduction in the number of horses racing would be sufficient in the case of horses while the RSPCA argues for less over breeding in the case of greyhounds. We believe that the most humane option is to prohibit the use of animals in competitive racing.
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    I agree with the sentiment - however can I not race my guinea pigs by myself in my back garden? :puppyeyes:

    (I don't actually have guinea pigs btw. It was just an example. )

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    Whilst any animal deaths at these events are incredibly tragic and sad, Horse Racing does contribute quite a bit to the economy.

    - 18,600 jobs would be lost with such an act
    - British Racing provides £325 million in tax
    - £3.4 billion indirect and direct contribution to the economy

    And lets not forget that Horse Racing is a key part of the social fabric of some communities in the country, not to mention bookies would suffer a lot.

    As for Greyhound racing, don't know enough about it to be frank.

    Nay from me.
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    Interesting bill. I'll have to think on it.

    What I'm wondering most, though, is: what [do you think] would be the repercussions for the vast numbers of animals currently alive that have been bred for this kind of competitive racing? I can't see a reason for such owners to keep hold of them and so they'd probably end up being slaughtered, which I don't think would be at all a desirable outcome.
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    It's a tough one. I do see your point agree with your prescription but CBI makes a compelling economic point.
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    For the reasons raised by CBI and Endless blue, it's a no from me as it stands.
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    Aye, though for the second reading I'd suggest increasing government donations to the RSPCA and other charities to provide shelter for animals that would otherwise have been involved in racing, just so as to ensure they don't end up in either our lasagnes or as glue. Likewise, ideally, it'd be nice to see greater punishments handed out to those guilty of animal cruelty. A man stamped a goose to death in my local park recently, and only got off with a warning - the RSPCA claims that such incidents attest to a recent rise in brutality against animals.

    If you wanted to go a step further and make this bill very comprehensive, you'd ban the execution of animals entirely - it's funny to me how some people are morally outraged by horrific horseracing, but don't seem that bothered by the butchery of similarly intelligent animals like cows - deaths that often occur under terrible conditions, largely thanks to the use of Halal and Kosher execution methods.
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    This place is turning into a leftie wet dream.

    No, for reasons stated above
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    Aye. Animals are entitled to the same rights as humans. No amount of economics can justify cruelty to animals in the form of sporting entertainment.
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    To be quite honest with you all our collective response to economic arguments was "**** that". Some things are more important. It is also economically brilliant to reintroduce slavery but we'd not consider doing that.
    (Original post by Mazzini)
    I agree with the sentiment - however can I not race my guinea pigs by myself in my back garden? :puppyeyes:

    (I don't actually have guinea pigs btw. It was just an example. )

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    In the same way that you can't force your pet ferrets to fight each other over treats, nope. So, yes, but only because no-one cares about that.
    (Original post by Endless Blue)
    Interesting bill. I'll have to think on it.

    What I'm wondering most, though, is: what [do you think] would be the repercussions for the vast numbers of animals currently alive that have been bred for this kind of competitive racing? I can't see a reason for such owners to keep hold of them and so they'd probably end up being slaughtered, which I don't think would be at all a desirable outcome.
    Well, partially the response is that you are always going to have some trouble in implementing change for the greater good. But largely we'll do what JPKC suggests below to mitigate this kind of problem.
    (Original post by JPKC)
    Aye, though for the second reading I'd suggest increasing government donations to the RSPCA and other charities to provide shelter for animals that would otherwise have been involved in racing, just so as to ensure they don't end up in either our lasagnes or as glue. Likewise, ideally, it'd be nice to see greater punishments handed out to those guilty of animal cruelty. A man stamped a goose to death in my local park recently, and only got off with a warning - the RSPCA claims that such incidents attest to a recent rise in brutality against animals.
    Yeah you're right, we'll probably put this in and also delay the commencement of the act.
    If you wanted to go a step further and make this bill very comprehensive, you'd ban the execution of animals entirely - it's funny to me how some people are morally outraged by horrific horseracing, but don't seem that bothered by the butchery of similarly intelligent animals like cows - deaths that often occur under terrible conditions, largely thanks to the use of Halal and Kosher execution methods.
    How would one do this?
    (Original post by MacDaddi)
    This place is turning into a leftie wet dream.

    No, for reasons stated above
    Well yes but that, frankly, is the Government's fault.
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    Aye
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    I'm very, very pro-animal rights - I was raised vegetarian and I've fought for the rights of non-human animals all my life, through fundraising and donations.

    However, I cannot support a bill that bans horse racing. Yes, it's tragic that occasionally horses die, but apart from its contribution to the economy, the vast majority of racing horses are treated incredibly well, and live very happy lives in what would seem to a horse to be luxury. A strong nay from me.
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    (Original post by Cheese_Monster)
    Aye. Animals are entitled to the same rights as humans. No amount of economics can justify cruelty to animals in the form of sporting entertainment.
    If animals have the same rights as us, why aren't you personally currently writing a bill that prohibits eating meat?
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    (Original post by tufc)
    If animals have the same rights as us, why aren't you personally currently writing a bill that prohibits eating meat?
    I'd be careful for what you wish
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    (Original post by tufc)
    I'm very, very pro-animal rights - I was raised vegetarian and I've fought for the rights of non-human animals all my life, through fundraising and donations.

    However, I cannot support a bill that bans horse racing. Yes, it's tragic that occasionally horses die, but apart from its contribution to the economy, the vast majority of racing horses are treated incredibly well, and live very happy lives in what would seem to a horse to be luxury. A strong nay from me.
    I've got to admit my total inability to see the logic in this. It's ok to force horses to race each other down dangerous courses specifically designed to be hard for them to do so because some of them live quite nice lives?
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    (Original post by Cannotbelieveit)
    Whilst any animal deaths at these events are incredibly tragic and sad, Horse Racing does contribute quite a bit to the economy.

    - 18,600 jobs would be lost with such an act
    - British Racing provides £325 million in tax
    - £3.4 billion indirect and direct contribution to the economy

    And lets not forget that Horse Racing is a key part of the social fabric of some communities in the country, not to mention bookies would suffer a lot.

    As for Greyhound racing, don't know enough about it to be frank.

    Nay from me.
    Whilst I'm sympathetic to people who would have to find new employment, we absolutely should not have an economy based on the abuse of animals in the first place.

    Hopefully the House can agree that job security and taxes are not enough to justify animal abuse. If not, then might I offer a tip from one to another: I've heard dog fighting is very lucrative - that is, if your heart can survive having its compassion displaced by pound notes.
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    (Original post by tufc)
    If animals have the same rights as us, why aren't you personally currently writing a bill that prohibits eating meat?
    I would be ecstatic to see such a bill, but you won't see it written by me so long as I've a mind not to let progress be impeded by idealism.
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    (Original post by Endless Blue)
    Interesting bill. I'll have to think on it.

    What I'm wondering most, though, is: what [do you think] would be the repercussions for the vast numbers of animals currently alive that have been bred for this kind of competitive racing? I can't see a reason for such owners to keep hold of them and so they'd probably end up being slaughtered, which I don't think would be at all a desirable outcome.
    I'd like to see them sold to places where they wouldn't be slaughtered, but it would be unrealistic to expect this to be the case for all (or maybe even many) of them. There's no way to sugar-coat this kind of thing; the sad fact is that these horses' fates were sealed the moment society decided to be complicit in this practice. We're resolved to see us complicit no more.
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    (Original post by MacDaddi)
    This place is turning into a leftie wet dream.

    No, for reasons stated above
    Hah! When you libertarians talk about the rights to freedom, presumably you have included freedom of humans to deny the freedoms of every other species? When a horse runs faster to escape his rider's whip, is that not a statement clear as any that it wishes not to continue to be hit? To promote liberty all day long, and yet not to support the animals who cry out for it, is promoting human supremacism, not liberty.
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    (Original post by miser)
    I'd like to see them sold to places where they wouldn't be slaughtered, but it would be unrealistic to expect this to be the case for all (or maybe even many) of them. There's no way to sugar-coat this kind of thing; the sad fact is that these horses' fates were sealed the moment society decided to be complicit in this practice. We're resolved to see us complicit no more.
    It is indeed a very difficult situation and I am inclined to support this bill. Though it will be incredibly sad to see scores of innocent animals wiped out it seems almost inevitable through this process, but is the lesser of two evils. I sympathise with JPKC's suggestions of stepping up funding to care for these animals through the transition phase, so to speak, but in reality I'm not sure it's feasible given the costs in the current climate and the animals would probably be resigned to another ill situation.

    Another query I have is: this bill doesn't apply to things like show jumping, which aren't explicitly racing, does it? Or does that constitute a race? It would seem odd not to ban them both if the premise is that animals should not be forced to partake in potentially dangerous activities.

    And, also, what would you think to seriously cracking down and enforcing stricter regulations on the process as an alternative? That is, if racing was made categorically much safer (limiting number of horses, for example, in a race or reducing fence heights and so on) so that the risk of harm was substantially reduced, would you support it? Or is it more about the idea of animals having no real choice in this that's more important to you? (Just wondering on what the strongest motives are.)
 
 
 
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