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    Hi everyone,

    I would be very grateful if some people could look through this whole text essay for Unit 1 (of mice and men) WJEC. Please offer some constructive comments and a mark if possible. Thank you very much!

    How is the character of Slim important to the novel as a whole?

    Slim is significant to providing a contrast to the depression and discrimination of the other characters on the ranch. His consistency makes him a tool of comparison and gives him a unique judge-like authority.

    Slim is important to contextualise other characters on the ranch. Because Slim is describes with such zealous descriptions such as ‘God-like eyes’ he is quickly established as a character with an excellent moral conduct. In contrast, Curley is described as ‘alla time picking scraps with big guys’. With Slim, we can constantly compare characters with him, to intensify their weaknesses. For example, Slim has an ‘authority so great that his word was taken on any subject’, whilst Curley ‘wore high-heeled boots’ to superficially show power. This comparison highlights Curley’s inner insecurity as we see he has to dress for respect whilst this comes to Slim naturally. Slim is also a character assessor on the ranch – his judgement on Lennie is that ‘he’s not mean’. All the time leading up to this, we as readers have probably already arrived to this opinion, but by an authoritive figure like Slim repeating it we can be sure of the innocence of Lennie’s actions.

    Furthermore, Slim’s power on the ranch makes him a voice of justice throughout the novel. Because justice is so subjective, Slim’s views provide an objective way of evaluating George’s latter decisions in the novel. We are initially surprised when we learn that Slim ‘drowned four of [the puppies] right off’, as it would be seen as a form of murder. However, his initial God-like descriptions deter us from seeing the wrong in his actions – but we consider that if he had not done this, the other puppies would have all starved. Through Slim justifying the doctrine of double effect, we realise how practicalities can take precedence over ideals. The novel was written in a time when resources were scarce and compromises had to be made – such as fitting into the dismal life of a migrant worker, so Slim’s actions are enforced as acceptable. This means that we are likely to support George’s decision later on in the novel when he decides to kill Lennie. George has to balance the pain of being the one to shoot his closest friend with the regret of ‘[letting] em hurt Lennie’. George can look to Slim’s example and come around to supporting double effect and accepting that Lennie’s death was inevitable. In a way, Slim’s judgements foreshadow the end of the novel, as we always anticipate that Lennie will get into trouble and the only way to end the cycle of moving ranch to ranch would be to kill him. However, even after the murder, Slim is unchanged – he still supports George and understands him, reassuring him and saying ‘never you mind, a guy got to sometimes’. Slim is defying the characteristic 1930s breakdown of trusts and friendships – it was a time where understandings were jeopardised and distances were created, but Slim reveals a true understanding of the complexities of George’s decision.

    Slim gives hope to the readers of the novel in many ways. It is set is bleak times where discrimination was widespread – whilst Crooks is racially segregated against, Curley’s wide is a victim of sexism. However, he is the only character who looks past these things and treats everybody equally. Whereas for most people, if Crooks says something ‘why it’s just a ****** saying it’, Slim comes into his room, which shows he is a man ready to form relationships with people at the lowest levels of society. Whereas all the other men call Curley’s wife a ‘tramp’ for her flirtacious, desperate state, Slim can empathise with her desires and addresses her as ‘hey beautiful’. So whilst other characters aim to mistreat others to feel more powerful (e.g. Curley’s wife threatening to lynch Crooks}, Slim reassures us that there are more morally righteous people. In a way, whilst other characters such as Crooks see the American Dream failing, as society limits his potential due to racial code of the time, Slim has already achieved his dream. He is the successful ‘jerkline skinner’ who is looked up to, someone who has made a positive identity and impression on the ranch and who has achieved prosperity. He has therefore demonstrated that even migrant workers can achieve a somewhat fulfilled life if they look past the negatives. Slim is stuck in the same turbulent times, so Steinbeck uses his success to highlight an optimistic possibility for migrant workers who may read the novel.

    As we have seen, Slim is significant in always being that constant, unchanging yardstick that highlights other characters’ weaknesses, but also strives to enliven other people’s lives through little interactions that other characters lack. His basic manners being seen as ‘good’ accentuates a weakened society of mistrust and broken communication, but Slim gives hope to readers all the same.
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    (Original post by cannonball.)
    Hi everyone,

    I would be very grateful if some people could look through this whole text essay for Unit 1 (of mice and men) WJEC. Please offer some constructive comments and a mark if possible. Thank you very much!

    How is the character of Slim important to the novel as a whole?

    Slim is significant to providing a contrast to the depression and discrimination of the other characters on the ranch. His consistency makes him a tool of comparison and gives him a unique judge-like authority.

    Slim is important to contextualise other characters on the ranch. Because Slim is described with such zealous descriptions such as ‘God-like eyes’ he is quickly established as a character with an excellent moral conduct. In contrast, Curley is described as ‘alla time picking scraps with big guys’. With Slim, we can constantly compare characters with him, to intensify their weaknesses. For example, Slim has an ‘authority so great that his word was taken on any subject’, whilst Curley ‘wore high-heeled boots’ to superficially show power. This comparison highlights Curley’s inner insecurity as we see he has to dress for respect whilst this comes to Slim naturally. Slim is also a character assessor on the ranch – his judgement on Lennie is that ‘he’s not mean’. All the time leading up to this, we as readers have probably already arrived to this opinion, but by an authoritive figure like Slim repeating it we can be sure of the innocence of Lennie’s actions.

    Furthermore, Slim’s power on the ranch makes him a voice of justice throughout the novel. Because justice is so subjective, Slim’s views provide an objective way of evaluating George’s latter decisions in the novel. We are initially surprised when we learn that Slim ‘drowned four of [the puppies] right off’, as it would be seen as a form of murder. However, his initial God-like descriptions deter us from seeing the wrong in his actions – but we consider that if he had not done this, the other puppies would have all starved. Through Slim justifying the doctrine of double effect, we realise how practicalities can take precedence over ideals. The novel was written in a time when resources were scarce and compromises had to be made – such as fitting into the dismal life of a migrant worker, so Slim’s actions are enforced as acceptable. This means that we are likely to support George’s decision later on in the novel when he decides to kill Lennie. George has to balance the pain of being the one to shoot his closest friend with the regret of ‘[letting] em hurt Lennie’. George can look to Slim’s example and come around to supporting double effect and accepting that Lennie’s death was inevitable. In a way, Slim’s judgements foreshadow the end of the novel, as we always anticipate that Lennie will get into trouble and the only way to end the cycle of moving ranch to ranch would be to kill him. However, even after the murder, Slim is unchanged – he still supports George and understands him, reassuring him and saying ‘never you mind, a guy got to sometimes’. Slim is defying the characteristic 1930s breakdown of trusts and friendships – it was a time where understandings were jeopardised and distances were created, but Slim reveals a true understanding of the complexities of George’s decision.

    Slim gives hope to the readers of the novel in many ways. It is set in bleak times where discrimination was widespread – whilst Crooks is racially segregated against, Curley’s wide is a victim of sexism. However, he is the only character who looks past these things and treats everybody equally. Whereas for most people, if Crooks says something ‘why it’s just a ****** saying it’, Slim comes into his room, which shows he is a man ready to form relationships with people at the lowest levels of society. Whereas all the other men call Curley’s wife a ‘tramp’ for her flirtatious, desperate state, Slim can empathise with her desires and addresses her as ‘hey beautiful’. So whilst other characters aim to mistreat others to feel more powerful (e.g. Curley’s wife threatening to lynch Crooks}, Slim reassures us that there are more morally righteous people. In a way, whilst other characters such as Crooks see the American Dream failing, as society limits his potential due to racial code of the time, Slim has already achieved his dream. He is the successful ‘jerkline skinner’ who is looked up to, someone who has made a positive identity and impression on the ranch and who has achieved prosperity. He has therefore demonstrated that even migrant workers can achieve a somewhat fulfilled life if they look past the negatives. Slim is stuck in the same turbulent times, so Steinbeck uses his success to highlight an optimistic possibility for migrant workers who may read the novel.

    As we have seen, Slim is significant in always being that constant, unchanging yardstick that highlights other characters’ weaknesses, but also strives to enliven other people’s lives through little interactions that other characters lack. His basic manners being seen as ‘good’ accentuates a weakened society of mistrust and broken communication, but Slim gives hope to readers all the same.
    Whilst I can't give it a precise mark due to my unfamiliarity to the criteria of the text it will be judged with, I enjoyed reading it. I emboldened a few parts which I suspected of having typos. I found it quite eloquent and succinct.
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    Thank you!

    Can someone please give an indication as to what grade this is and how to improve?
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    (Original post by cannonball.)
    Hi everyone,

    I would be very grateful if some people could look through this whole text essay for Unit 1 (of mice and men) WJEC. Please offer some constructive comments and a mark if possible. Thank you very much!

    How is the character of Slim important to the novel as a whole?

    Slim is significant to providing a contrast to the depression and discrimination of the other characters on the ranch. His consistency makes him a tool of comparison and gives him a unique judge-like authority.

    Slim is important to contextualise other characters on the ranch. Because Slim is describes with such zealous descriptions such as ‘God-like eyes’ he is quickly established as a character with an excellent moral conduct. In contrast, Curley is described as ‘alla time picking scraps with big guys’. With Slim, we can constantly compare characters with him, to intensify their weaknesses. For example, Slim has an ‘authority so great that his word was taken on any subject’, whilst Curley ‘wore high-heeled boots’ to superficially show power. This comparison highlights Curley’s inner insecurity as we see he has to dress for respect whilst this comes to Slim naturally. Slim is also a character assessor on the ranch – his judgement on Lennie is that ‘he’s not mean’. All the time leading up to this, we as readers have probably already arrived to this opinion, but by an authoritive figure like Slim repeating it we can be sure of the innocence of Lennie’s actions.

    Furthermore, Slim’s power on the ranch makes him a voice of justice throughout the novel. Because justice is so subjective, Slim’s views provide an objective way of evaluating George’s latter decisions in the novel. We are initially surprised when we learn that Slim ‘drowned four of [the puppies] right off’, as it would be seen as a form of murder. However, his initial God-like descriptions deter us from seeing the wrong in his actions – but we consider that if he had not done this, the other puppies would have all starved. Through Slim justifying the doctrine of double effect, we realise how practicalities can take precedence over ideals. The novel was written in a time when resources were scarce and compromises had to be made – such as fitting into the dismal life of a migrant worker, so Slim’s actions are enforced as acceptable. This means that we are likely to support George’s decision later on in the novel when he decides to kill Lennie. George has to balance the pain of being the one to shoot his closest friend with the regret of ‘[letting] em hurt Lennie’. George can look to Slim’s example and come around to supporting double effect and accepting that Lennie’s death was inevitable. In a way, Slim’s judgements foreshadow the end of the novel, as we always anticipate that Lennie will get into trouble and the only way to end the cycle of moving ranch to ranch would be to kill him. However, even after the murder, Slim is unchanged – he still supports George and understands him, reassuring him and saying ‘never you mind, a guy got to sometimes’. Slim is defying the characteristic 1930s breakdown of trusts and friendships – it was a time where understandings were jeopardised and distances were created, but Slim reveals a true understanding of the complexities of George’s decision.

    Slim gives hope to the readers of the novel in many ways. It is set is bleak times where discrimination was widespread – whilst Crooks is racially segregated against, Curley’s wide is a victim of sexism. However, he is the only character who looks past these things and treats everybody equally. Whereas for most people, if Crooks says something ‘why it’s just a ****** saying it’, Slim comes into his room, which shows he is a man ready to form relationships with people at the lowest levels of society. Whereas all the other men call Curley’s wife a ‘tramp’ for her flirtacious, desperate state, Slim can empathise with her desires and addresses her as ‘hey beautiful’. So whilst other characters aim to mistreat others to feel more powerful (e.g. Curley’s wife threatening to lynch Crooks}, Slim reassures us that there are more morally righteous people. In a way, whilst other characters such as Crooks see the American Dream failing, as society limits his potential due to racial code of the time, Slim has already achieved his dream. He is the successful ‘jerkline skinner’ who is looked up to, someone who has made a positive identity and impression on the ranch and who has achieved prosperity. He has therefore demonstrated that even migrant workers can achieve a somewhat fulfilled life if they look past the negatives. Slim is stuck in the same turbulent times, so Steinbeck uses his success to highlight an optimistic possibility for migrant workers who may read the novel.

    As we have seen, Slim is significant in always being that constant, unchanging yardstick that highlights other characters’ weaknesses, but also strives to enliven other people’s lives through little interactions that other characters lack. His basic manners being seen as ‘good’ accentuates a weakened society of mistrust and broken communication, but Slim gives hope to readers all the same.
    Your essay is AMAZING...u hav used high standard vocabulary and your answer is very concise and you don't go off topic often, so it is very good. I don't know your mark scheem a my exam board is OCR but I definitely think this essay should be somewhere around mid-A. What is the main thing to consider in ur essay in WJEC? In OCR, 15% of the answer needs to be about context and then 10% abotu structure, form, language...if urs is also mainly about context...u might want to comment about Steinbeck trying to use Slim even though such person wouldn't have really existed in 1930's along with your conclusion which explains about Sim being "unchanging yardstick that highlights other characters’ weaknesses"
    Good Luck with ur exam...I m sure u'll b fine and get a v.good grade
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    It's absolutely brilliant! I'm not sure about the markscheme as I'm doing AQA but it definitely meets the band 6 criteria for me! Good luck.
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    I assume you are doing the exam on Monday? So am I. Not looking forward to it.

    Anyway, I think that out of 20 I would give this at least 18, 19 ish. Excellent use of vocabulary, good, deep analysis, good discussion of themes, perhaps you could include a little more about Steinbeck's intentions e.g. "Steinbeck uses Slim almost as an idol; by presenting Slim in an overwhelmingly positive light he encourages his readers, both of the 1930s and of modern times, to stringently follow one's own moral code and to uphold social standards. I believe that Steinbeck is very successful in persuading the reader to join in his personal opinion. This presentation is contrasted with the rather negative portrayal of Carlson who is conversely shown to have nothing in the way of ethics." Our teacher suggested that we critique the novel a little, so maybe you could do some more of that perhaps.


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    HA thanks dude, needed some last minute themes, covered them for me very nicely. AQA is the board i have, but as previously mentioned, you fit band 5 maybe band 6, high A - mid A*. good job yo!!!
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    (Original post by cannonball.)
    Thank you!

    Can someone please give an indication as to what grade this is and how to improve?
    Brilliant essay! You could improve by more language analysis? Like motifs , metaphors, imagery e.t.c
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    Well done with this, it's very well written. I'd give it a high A. If you want the A*, you need to give alternative views. E.g. when you say that Slim supports George after he shot Lennie, you could say that he supports George because maybe Slim has had to do something like this, which you could justify using the idea that Slim only listens, and doesn't talk about himself; Slim represents redemption or penance in the novel. Also, analyse descriptions more- Slim and the boss both have stetsons, so what does that suggest.
    Still, it's an amazing essay
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    Grade A
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    amazing vocab!!! An improvement would be individual word analysis, finding language techniques gets you extra marks as it shows you can evaluate textual detail.
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    Thx A lot I'm doing mine in 2014
    AM using urs as inspiration although the questions are random in da conflict cluster so :/
    But Don't want to be too stressed
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    In general, your Of Mice and Men essay is pretty good. You've included weighty arguments and I like your reasoning. You may want only to proofread it more carefully. For instance, in this sentence "It is set is bleak times" you obviously meant "in bleak times".
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    Timely advice.
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    So am I
    how are you revising for it?
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    Who do you think is coming for literature this year
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    Does anyone think this needs more context for the WJEC board? 68% of the marks are given for context. If anyone could add some context that would be great
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    im pretty sure thats wrong. You must get more marks for actually writing about the book that just context?
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    This essay is definitely good, but can be improved. Any English essay requires close analysis of language, and that's the only part you've missed. It would be interesting to look at the significance of the language portraying Slim as a godlike figure on the ranch; you say that his "godlike eyes" give him a sense of moral conduct, but how? You fail to substantiate that argument. It might be worth closely analysing each quotation you use so that you can provide an evaluative basis for them.

    "Godlike eyes": Steinbeck draws on theology to deify Slim; the significance of the "eyes" could be that Slim is positioned as an onlooker to the suffering, or it could be argued that it represents the bleak and godless lives of migrant workers in 1930s America which forces them to search for a God in other men.
    "Alla time picking scraps with big guys": Curley is juxtaposed to Slim through the notion of "big guys", as Curley is described as a little man in terms of both morality and stature. As he is "alla time picking scraps", his pugnacious attitude towards others is contrasted to Slim's role as godlike moderator on the ranch.
    "Authority so great that his word was taken on any subject": This demonstrates the reverence the other workers had for Slim, but could be a continuation of the semantic field of theology, as it would be believed that the "great[est] authority" came from God, which would further reinforce the idea that Steinbeck intended to portray a godless and bleak society.

    If you need any more help, just let me know. I got full marks on my English Lit GCSE and 119/120 at English Lit AS.
 
 
 
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