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All-star cast movies: doomed to fail? watch

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    They're so polarising, in that they're either really good, or they're totally crap. Most are crap, I think. Maybe directors really think that if you have lots of egos in one studio, critics will like you AND you'll make money in the box-office. Kill 2 birds with one stone. Having your cake and eating it. It's like directors saw Ocean's 11 and thought "I've just GOT to get all the 80s action stars in one movie... and Arnold". And when did you last see a good all-star romantic comedy? Even if it's not, say, Love Actually, it must've been long ago.

    There's no way out though. The main problem is rarely the production. Usually the storylines are either really bloated, or they're unconnected vignettes cobbled together in a nice little bow. Not to mention the terrible acting. I bet the actors think "hey, you can't be arsed to write a good script, I can't be arsed to act on top form today, plus you're paying me millions to shut up about it". I mean, consider just the last 5 years. We had New Year's Eve; Valentine's Day; The Expendables; Movie 43; The Big Wedding; You Will Meet a Tall, Dark, Stranger; What to Expect When You're Expecting, Les Miserables (2012); Grown Ups and others I can't remember. None of those were brilliant, and none were great in global box-office terms either. What does everyone else think? Are we in an age where all-star movies hit the mark less and less?
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    Since when did 18-24 year olds care about first-class acting, scriptwriting and production? It's Hollywood, mate, money talks :cool:. All-star flicks have a young target audience. If famous guys are in it, they'll watch it. Apart from The Big Wedding, every single one of the movies you listed broke even at box-office; Les Mis made $437m at the last count! Once you grant that most directors, writers and film studios nowadays wanna make a quick buck and don't care about top-quality film production (or just don't know how to make one - hey, we can't all be artists ), you'll appreciate that the all-star formula gets bums on seats, simple. So, all-star movies are really doomed to succeed, aren't they?
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    The Departed didn't fail.
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    (Original post by TheMagicRat)
    The Departed didn't fail.
    It didn't only not fail, it generated a whole new level of commercial and artistic credibility for Scorsese, DiCaprio, even Wahlberg, and all the cast and crew involved. I'm gonna sound hokey, but isn't that the whole purpose of an all-star film, the spirit of an ensemble cast?

    Anyway, you're right, The Departed didn't fail, and many all-star films don't fail either, just like most films don't fail. My point is that many all-star films don't "succeed," to use chockypud's words. Nowadays the trend is that most films (all-star, independent, middle-of-the-road drama, thrillers, horrors, whatever) don't "succeed". Why use all that money to buy hundreds of man-hours of A-star talent if the best you and your producers, writers and editors can come up with is a second-rate, unchallenging and anodyne 90 minute hodge-podge, where the only saving grace IS the profit it makes?
    (Original post by chockypud)
    Since when did 18-24 year olds care about first-class acting, scriptwriting and production? It's Hollywood, mate, money talks :cool:...
    I get your point, that studio execs have a part to play. Perhaps the balance is now in favour of the failing all-star film (i.e. it's "winning" the box-office battle) because on paper, those projects are more commercially viable. It kinda reflects the trend of the whole film industry: 'Michael Bay over Woody Allen' sorta thing. This'll sound disingenuous, but could this all be happening because the guys who watch this crap actually like it? Am I just having a snooty dig at collective cinematic preferences? What I do know is that the development of Movie 43 demonstrates, to borrow Alan Rickman's HP1 Severus Snape line, "clearly, fame isn't everything" (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/northamerica/usa/9844090/Movie-43-How-Kate-Winslet-and-Hugh-Jackman-lured-all-star-cast-to-the-worst-film-ever.html)
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    (Original post by special1ne)
    I get your point, that studio execs have a part to play. Perhaps the balance is now in favour of the failing all-star film (i.e. it's "winning" the box-office battle) because on paper, those projects are more commercially viable. It kinda reflects the trend of the whole film industry: 'Michael Bay over Woody Allen' sorta thing. This'll sound disingenuous, but could this all be happening because the guys who watch this crap actually like it? Am I just having a snooty dig at collective cinematic preferences? What I do know is that the development of Movie 43 demonstrates, to borrow Alan Rickman's HP1 Severus Snape line, "clearly, fame isn't everything" (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/northamerica/usa/9844090/Movie-43-How-Kate-Winslet-and-Hugh-Jackman-lured-all-star-cast-to-the-worst-film-ever.html)
    In a way, the easy response is to ask what's wrong if directors and film execs want to recreate the magic of Love Actually and Ocean's Eleven? It can't just be art for art's sake all the time, right? Even assuming that all directors, writers, editors and producers are artists 24/7 is laying it on too thick. Like most people, when they see a chance to potentially make lots of money with each film, they grab it. And because the vogue now is "you've gotta spend a lot to make a lot", hiring ten A-list actors is just a means to an end. So it really is a gamble, there's just as much chance of making a dud movie with loads of A-listers in it as there is making "the film of our generation" with A-listers. All that's happened now is that all-star casts have mostly resulted in the former. But the odds aren't stacked against the latter happening any more now than before. Therefore, in the minds of film execs (especially), the idea of using the ensemble cast 'formula' to make big bucks hasn't been impeached.
 
 
 
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