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Comparison Paragraph between Franco Zeffirelli and Baz Luhrmann Watch

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    Hi,

    I wanted to know what grade you lot think this piece of coursework deserves


    Comparison between the two film versions Romeo & Juliet by Luhrmann & Zefferelli.

    When analyzing the two distinct 'Romeo and Juliet' films and comparing them, I noticed that both Zefferelli and Luhrmann had a different interpretation of Shakespeare’s version of ‘Romeo and Juliet’.

    For example, Franco Zefferelli produced his film in 1968, and Baz Luhrmann produced his in 1997.
    Both films provided very different perspectives on Shakespeare's text because of the eras they were set in. The symbolism and imagery in both films were very different because of this factor.
    Zefferelli’s film remains faithful to Shakespeare’s original play, whereas Luhrmann made a more modern version of it.
    Zefferelli didn’t change the play much; it was aimed at people who wanted a film that was basically the same as the play, but with better scenery and cuts. Even though the play was meant for all audiences to enjoy it, generally Zefferelli aimed at adults like the play did.

    However, Luhrmann aimed at a younger age group, and he made it a lot more exciting and violent, he also set it in modern times so as to make it more believable for younger audiences, and so that younger audiences would appreciate it more, rather than ‘some old play’ as they might have put it.
    Luhrmann’s main goal was to make money, and he did that by making it more exciting with up to date music and sound effects for a younger audience, he modernised and adapted the play to suit the younger audiences.
    Luhrmann and Zefferelli had different interpretations of Romeo and Juliet because they had different goals. Zefferelli was trying to produce a classic Shakespearean production, much like you would have seen on stage. Luhrmann was trying to produce a marketable, popular version of Romeo and Juliet.

    Baz Luhrmann created his movie in 1997 with Leonardo Di Caprio and Claire Danes taking the lead roles, he used young and popular, successful actors, to ensure the film’s marketability.
    Franco Zefferelli, however, created his film in 1970, starring Leonardo Whitting and Olivia Hussey, focusing on how well the actors played the part of the character, as he wanted to keep the originality of the play.

    Clever film techniques were used in Luhrmann’s film, for example at a very emotional moment, when Tybalt dies, the camera tilts down to see the gun in Romeo’s hand, and stays there for an extended time, which is very symbolic as it makes you think about what the gun can do and you see the virgin Mary on the side of it, the whole film pauses for a second so that everyone can contemplate on what just happened.
    Both of the films are a tragedy type film because of the deaths of close family and friends; there is fighting and despair, and two of the main characters die during scene three and two more die in the final scene, concluding the play. Both of the films are romances, and the main theme of the film. However the romance is brought into scene three, because of the fight between Romeo, Mercutio and Tybalt in Luhrmann’s version made it feel more important and noticeable. These alterations of the script by Luhrmann made the film more like a modern drama and considerably different to the Zefferelli version.


    Because the films were created twenty-nine years apart and both writers wanted to appeal to different audiences, the films contrasted greatly.
    The most evident differences between the two movies were the settings and props. Neither film stayed completely faithful to the text in this respect. The Luhrmann version changed the location from Verona, Italy to Los Angeles, USA. The props were then updated from the 1600s to their modern-day equivalent, guns, and the coastal area was re-named "Verona Beach".
    Even though Zefferelli chose a more classical setting, he still changed some of the scenery. These were mainly minor changes in outdoor scenes that couldn't be exactly simulated on a stage.
    Some of the scenes weren't even in the written text, such as Romeo and Balthasar galloping from Mantua, and others, such as the large peasant-filled Verona Square, could have been depicted more authentically.
    Another significant difference in the directors' interpretations of Romeo and Juliet is what they omitted or edited. The murder of Paris was totally withdrawn from both movies. This single reduction did in fact totally alter the conclusion of the story.
    In Shakespeare's version, Romeo still could have been accepted into society before killing Paris (as Father Laurence pointed out), since he was exiled for killing Tybalt, Mercutio's murderer. In Both movies Romeo chased Tybalt and challenged him to a duel, but in the original, it was Tybalt who attacked Romeo. Romeo was defending himself when he killed Tybalt, so he was in a good position in the eyes of the 16th century law system. In the movies, Romeo's suicide was even more of an act of blind passion than it was in the original text.
    As well as leaving out Paris' death, the Luhrmann production spoilt the ending scene. By having Juliet wake up while Romeo was dying, this created a dramatic drop in the atmosphere, which generated a feeling of despair.
    To further dampen the ending of Luhrmann’s version, the Capulet and Montague lords didn't reconcile with each other in the light of their children's death. As a result of this the last little bit of hope was lost.
    Both the Zefferelli and the Luhrmann films, showed how bizarre ‘Romeo and Juliet’ really was. It was full of sex, violence, murder plots, family feuds, conspiracies, and a number of other illegal activities. These things were more obvious in the Luhrmann version because of its modern setting. We would never have expected two people who started a gun fight at a gas station to be let off with a mere warning from the police. Because of its isolation and early era, it was sometimes possible to lose sight of how strange the story really was when watching the Zefferelli production.
    Luhrmann's film work was about youth, and how its optimism, energy, and inexperience are so ultimately human and real. That was one reason why he took a modern approach to Romeo and Juliet.
    In contrast Franco Zefferelli's portrayal of Romeo and Juliet added a powerful realism because the play was set in Verona, and actually shot in Italy by an Italian director.

    Both films were very different, one (Zefferelli’s) was an authentic replica of what the story was originally, and one (Luhrmann’s) was an up to date film about modern times.
    Both were classics in their own generation.

    A lot of their differences were due to the time that the films were made, each would be almost ludicrous for the other to make, Luhrmann wouldn’t make any money and Zefferelli would be thought of as crazy.
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    (Original post by Jamie1996)
    Hi,

    I wanted to know what grade you lot think this piece of coursework deserves


    Comparison between the two film versions Romeo & Juliet by Luhrmann & Zefferelli.

    When analyzing the two distinct 'Romeo and Juliet' films and comparing them, I noticed that both Zefferelli and Luhrmann had a different interpretation of Shakespeare’s version of ‘Romeo and Juliet’.
    - One really quick tip, that my English teacher is always telling us is to avoid using the first person in English Essays, for example you could write: Through analysis and comparison of the two distinct 'Romeo and Juliet' films, it is evident that both Zefferelli and Luhrmann have differed intepretations of Shakespeare's original play, 'Romeo and Juliet'

    For example, Franco Zefferelli produced his film in 1968, and Baz Luhrmann produced his in 1997.
    Both films provided very different perspectives on Shakespeare's text because of the eras they were set in. The symbolism and imagery in both films were very different because of this factor.
    Try to develop your point further - It's good to leave an impression on the examiner - just don't leave them hanging... For example, Franco Zefferelli produced his film in 1968, whereas Baz Luhrmann produced his in 1997. Both films therefore provided very different perspectives on Shakespeare's text due to the different eras they are set in. This factor also contributes to the major differences in symbolism and imagery in the two film versions such as...
    Zefferelli’s film remains faithful to Shakespeare’s original play, whereas Luhrmann made a more modern version of it.
    Zefferelli didn’t change the play much; it was aimed at people who wanted a film that was basically the same as the play, but with better scenery and cuts. Even though the play was meant for all audiences to enjoy it, generally Zefferelli aimed at adults like the play did.
    However, Luhrmann aimed at a younger age group, and he made it a lot more exciting and violent, he also set it in modern times so as to make it more believable for younger audiences, and so that younger audiences would appreciate it more, rather than ‘some old play’ as they might have put it.
    Luhrmann’s main goal was to make money, and he did that by making it more exciting with up to date music and sound effects for a younger audience, he modernised and adapted the play to suit the younger audiences.
    Luhrmann and Zefferelli had different interpretations of Romeo and Juliet because they had different goals. Zefferelli was trying to produce a classic Shakespearean production, much like you would have seen on stage. Luhrmann was trying to produce a marketable, popular version of Romeo and Juliet.

    Baz Luhrmann created his movie in 1997 with Leonardo Di Caprio and Claire Danes taking the lead roles, he used young and popular, successful actors, to ensure the film’s marketability.
    Franco Zefferelli, however, created his film in 1970, starring Leonardo Whitting and Olivia Hussey, focusing on how well the actors played the part of the character, as he wanted to keep the originality of the play.

    Clever film techniques were used in Luhrmann’s film, for example at a very emotional moment, when Tybalt dies, the camera tilts down to see the gun in Romeo’s hand, and stays there for an extended time, which is very symbolic as it makes you think about what the gun can do and you see the virgin Mary on the side of it, the whole film pauses for a second so that everyone can contemplate on what just happened.
    Both of the films are a tragedy type film because of the deaths of close family and friends; there is fighting and despair, and two of the main characters die during scene three and two more die in the final scene, concluding the play. Both of the films are romances, and the main theme of the film. However the romance is brought into scene three, because of the fight between Romeo, Mercutio and Tybalt in Luhrmann’s version made it feel more important and noticeable. These alterations of the script by Luhrmann made the film more like a modern drama and considerably different to the Zefferelli version.


    Because the films were created twenty-nine years apart and both writers wanted to appeal to different audiences, the films contrasted greatly.
    The most evident differences between the two movies were the settings and props. Neither film stayed completely faithful to the text in this respect. The Luhrmann version changed the location from Verona, Italy to Los Angeles, USA. The props were then updated from the 1600s to their modern-day equivalent, guns, and the coastal area was re-named "Verona Beach".
    Even though Zefferelli chose a more classical setting, he still changed some of the scenery. These were mainly minor changes in outdoor scenes that couldn't be exactly simulated on a stage.
    Some of the scenes weren't even in the written text, such as Romeo and Balthasar galloping from Mantua, and others, such as the large peasant-filled Verona Square, could have been depicted more authentically.
    Another significant difference in the directors' interpretations of Romeo and Juliet is what they omitted or edited. The murder of Paris was totally withdrawn from both movies. This single reduction did in fact totally alter the conclusion of the story.
    In Shakespeare's version, Romeo still could have been accepted into society before killing Paris (as Father Laurence pointed out), since he was exiled for killing Tybalt, Mercutio's murderer. In Both movies Romeo chased Tybalt and challenged him to a duel, but in the original, it was Tybalt who attacked Romeo. Romeo was defending himself when he killed Tybalt, so he was in a good position in the eyes of the 16th century law system. In the movies, Romeo's suicide was even more of an act of blind passion than it was in the original text.
    As well as leaving out Paris' death, the Luhrmann production spoilt the ending scene. By having Juliet wake up while Romeo was dying, this created a dramatic drop in the atmosphere, which generated a feeling of despair.
    To further dampen the ending of Luhrmann’s version, the Capulet and Montague lords didn't reconcile with each other in the light of their children's death. As a result of this the last little bit of hope was lost.
    Both the Zefferelli and the Luhrmann films, showed how bizarre ‘Romeo and Juliet’ really was. It was full of sex, violence, murder plots, family feuds, conspiracies, and a number of other illegal activities. These things were more obvious in the Luhrmann version because of its modern setting. We would never have expected two people who started a gun fight at a gas station to be let off with a mere warning from the police. Because of its isolation and early era, it was sometimes possible to lose sight of how strange the story really was when watching the Zefferelli production.
    Luhrmann's film work was about youth, and how its optimism, energy, and inexperience are so ultimately human and real. That was one reason why he took a modern approach to Romeo and Juliet.
    In contrast Franco Zefferelli's portrayal of Romeo and Juliet added a powerful realism because the play was set in Verona, and actually shot in Italy by an Italian director.

    Both films were very different, one (Zefferelli’s) was an authentic replica of what the story was originally, and one (Luhrmann’s) was an up to date film about modern times.
    Both were classics in their own generation.

    A lot of their differences were due to the time that the films were made, each would be almost ludicrous for the other to make, Luhrmann wouldn’t make any money and Zefferelli would be thought of as crazy.
    I think this is about Grade B work - however there is definitely room for improvement.
    Focus on further developing your points - go for quality over quantity (sorry for the cliche) however make sure your response reaches the minimum word amount
    Also, if this is what you plan to write as your actual response, I recommend taking it down ASAP to avoid the exam board thinking it is plagiarism.
 
 
 
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